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Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry sampson-william-thomas
Sampson, William Thomas 1840- Naval officer; born in Palmyra, N. Y., Feb. 9, 1840; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1860; promoted master in 1861; lieutenant in 1862; lieutenant-commander in 1866; commander in 1874; William Thomas Sampson. captain in 1889; and was superintendent of the Naval Academy in 1886-90. In the Civil War he was serving as executive officer of the iron-clad Patapsco when that vessel was destroyed by a mine in Charleston Harbor. He was blown into the water, but was soon rescued. In the latter part of February, 1898, he was made president of the board of inquiry on the destruction of the United States battle-ship Maine in Havana Harbor (see Cuba). After war was declared against Spain he was appointed acting rear-admiral by the President, and placed in command of the North Atlantic Squadron over the heads of ten officers his seniors in rank. He was ordered to blockade Havana, April 21, 1898. With a portion of his fleet he bombarded the fo
ued. In the latter part of February, 1898, he was made president of the board of inquiry on the destruction of the United States battle-ship Maine in Havana Harbor (see Cuba). After war was declared against Spain he was appointed acting rear-admiral by the President, and placed in command of the North Atlantic Squadron over the heads of ten officers his seniors in rank. He was ordered to blockade Havana, April 21, 1898. With a portion of his fleet he bombarded the fortifications at San Juan, Porto Rico, May 12. He then placed the strongest part of his squadron off the southern shore of Cuba. On May 19, after eluding the American ships, Admiral Cervera, entered the harbor of Santiago with his fleet. On May 31, Sampson bombarded the fortifications at the entrance of Santiago harbor, and on June 9 seized Guantanamo Bay and made it a base of supplies. On the morning of July 3, when Admiral Cervera attempted to escape from Santiago Harbor, Rear-Admiral Sampson, with the flag-ship
Palmyra, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry sampson-william-thomas
Sampson, William Thomas 1840- Naval officer; born in Palmyra, N. Y., Feb. 9, 1840; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1860; promoted master in 1861; lieutenant in 1862; lieutenant-commander in 1866; commander in 1874; William Thomas Sampson. captain in 1889; and was superintendent of the Naval Academy in 1886-90. In the Civil War he was serving as executive officer of the iron-clad Patapsco when that vessel was destroyed by a mine in Charleston Harbor. He was blown into the water, but was soon rescued. In the latter part of February, 1898, he was made president of the board of inquiry on the destruction of the United States battle-ship Maine in Havana Harbor (see Cuba). After war was declared against Spain he was appointed acting rear-admiral by the President, and placed in command of the North Atlantic Squadron over the heads of ten officers his seniors in rank. He was ordered to blockade Havana, April 21, 1898. With a portion of his fleet he bombarded the for
the heads of ten officers his seniors in rank. He was ordered to blockade Havana, April 21, 1898. With a portion of his fleet he bombarded the fortifications at San Juan, Porto Rico, May 12. He then placed the strongest part of his squadron off the southern shore of Cuba. On May 19, after eluding the American ships, Admiral Cervera, entered the harbor of Santiago with his fleet. On May 31, Sampson bombarded the fortifications at the entrance of Santiago harbor, and on June 9 seized Guantanamo Bay and made it a base of supplies. On the morning of July 3, when Admiral Cervera attempted to escape from Santiago Harbor, Rear-Admiral Sampson, with the flag-ship New York, was about 7 miles from the entrance to Santiago Harbor, returning from Siboney, whither he had gone for a conference with General Shafter. In the absence of Rear-Admiral Sampson the command of the American fleet devolved on Rear-Admiral Schley. The battle which resulted in the destruction of Admiral Cervera's fle
United States (United States) (search for this): entry sampson-william-thomas
Sampson, William Thomas 1840- Naval officer; born in Palmyra, N. Y., Feb. 9, 1840; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1860; promoted master in 1861; lieutenant in 1862; lieutenant-commander in 1866; commander in 1874; William Thomas Sampson. captain in 1889; and was superintendent of the Naval Academy in 1886-90. In the Civil War he was serving as executive officer of the iron-clad Patapsco when that vessel was destroyed by a mine in Charleston Harbor. He was blown into the water, but was soon rescued. In the latter part of February, 1898, he was made president of the board of inquiry on the destruction of the United States battle-ship Maine in Havana Harbor (see Cuba). After war was declared against Spain he was appointed acting rear-admiral by the President, and placed in command of the North Atlantic Squadron over the heads of ten officers his seniors in rank. He was ordered to blockade Havana, April 21, 1898. With a portion of his fleet he bombarded the f
The distance of the vessels from the harbor entrance was from 2 1/2 to 4 miles, the latter being the limit of the day blockading distance. The length of the arc formed by the ships was about 8 miles. the Massachusetts had left at 4 A. M. for Guantanamo for coal. Her station was between the Iowa and the Texas. The auxiliaries Gloucester and Vixen lay close to the land and nearer the harbor entrance than the large vessels, the Gloucester to the eastward and the Vixen to the westward. The tornish ship should appear. The commanding officers merit the greatest praise for the perfect manner in which they entered into this plan and put it into execution. the Massachusetts, which, according to routine, was sent that morning to coal at Guantanamo, like the others had spent weary nights upon this work, and deserved a better fate than to be absent that morning. I enclose for the information of the department copies of orders and memoranda issued from time to time relating to the manner
ers his seniors in rank. He was ordered to blockade Havana, April 21, 1898. With a portion of his fleet he bombarded the fortifications at San Juan, Porto Rico, May 12. He then placed the strongest part of his squadron off the southern shore of Cuba. On May 19, after eluding the American ships, Admiral Cervera, entered the harbor of Santiago with his fleet. On May 31, Sampson bombarded the fortifications at the entrance of Santiago harbor, and on June 9 seized Guantanamo Bay and made it a bt to appoint both Sampson and Schley to that grade, but this measure also failed to pass in Congress. After the close of the hostilities Rear-Admiral Sampson was appointed one of the three American commissioners to arrange for the evacuation of Cuba; and after that act had been accomplished he resumed active command of the North Atlantic Station till Oct. 14, 1899, when he was appointed commandant of tile navy-yard at Boston. See Schley, Winfield Scott. Report on Santiago battle.—The foll
l was destroyed by a mine in Charleston Harbor. He was blown into the water, but was soon rescued. In the latter part of February, 1898, he was made president of the board of inquiry on the destruction of the United States battle-ship Maine in Havana Harbor (see Cuba). After war was declared against Spain he was appointed acting rear-admiral by the President, and placed in command of the North Atlantic Squadron over the heads of ten officers his seniors in rank. He was ordered to blockade Havana, April 21, 1898. With a portion of his fleet he bombarded the fortifications at San Juan, Porto Rico, May 12. He then placed the strongest part of his squadron off the southern shore of Cuba. On May 19, after eluding the American ships, Admiral Cervera, entered the harbor of Santiago with his fleet. On May 31, Sampson bombarded the fortifications at the entrance of Santiago harbor, and on June 9 seized Guantanamo Bay and made it a base of supplies. On the morning of July 3, when Admir
William Thomas Sampson (search for this): entry sampson-william-thomas
Sampson, William Thomas 1840- Naval officer; born in Palmyra, N. Y., Feb. 9, 1840; graduated aarbor of Santiago with his fleet. On May 31, Sampson bombarded the fortifications at the entrance tempted to escape from Santiago Harbor, Rear-Admiral Sampson, with the flag-ship New York, was abouith General Shafter. In the absence of Rear-Admiral Sampson the command of the American fleet devolfleet was fought on plans formulated by Rear-Admiral Sampson, who was unable to reach the scene of tntroversy arose between the friends of Rear-Admirals Sampson and Schley. This extended into the Cond to authorize the President to appoint both Sampson and Schley to that grade, but this measure al. After the close of the hostilities Rear-Admiral Sampson was appointed one of the three Americango battle.—The following is the text of Rear-Admiral Sampson's report as commander-in-chief of the U remainder. The report of the board will be speedily forwarded. Very respectfully, W. T. Sampson.[1 more...]
mpson, with the flag-ship New York, was about 7 miles from the entrance to Santiago Harbor, returning from Siboney, whither he had gone for a conference with General Shafter. In the absence of Rear-Admiral Sampson the command of the American fleet devolved on Rear-Admiral Schley. The battle which resulted in the destruction of Aes from the harbor entrance. She had started from Siboney, where I intended to land, accompanied by several of my staff, and go to the front and consult with General Shafter. A discussion of the situation and a more definite understanding between us of the operations proposed had been rendered necessary by the unexpectedly strong resistance of the Spanish garrison of Santiago. I had sent my chief of staff on shore the day before to arrange an interview with General Shafter, who had been suffering from heat prostration. I made arrangements to go to his headquarters, and my flag-ship was in the position mentioned above when the Spanish squadron appeared in
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