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Valparaiso (Indiana, United States) (search for this): entry schley-winfield-scott
graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1860; was with the West Gulf blockading squadron in 1861; took part in the engagements which led to the surrender of Port Hudson, La., in 1863; was promoted lieutenant-commander in 1866, and commander in 1874. He was placed in command of the Arctic relief expedition in 1884, and rescued Lieutenant Greely and six survivors at Cape Sabine. He was promoted captain in 1888, and in 1891, when a number of American sailors were stoned by a mob in Valparaiso, Chile, he went to that port in command of the Baltimore and settled the trouble. In August, 1891, the Baltimore, still under his command, was detailed to convey the remains of John Ericsson (q. v.) to Sweden, in recognition of which service he received a gold medal from the King of Sweden. He was promoted commodore in February, 1898, and when the American-Spanish War began was given command of the newly organized Flying Squadron for service off the coasts of the United States and Cuba
Guantanamo Bay (Cuba) (search for this): entry schley-winfield-scott
ervera to escape, Rear-Admiral Schley was in immediate command of the American fleet, as Rear-Admiral Sampson, the commander-in-chief of the naval force, was absent on a run to Siboney. He was promoted rear-admiral in August, 1898; and was appointed commander-in-chief of the South Atlantic Station. He was retired on reaching the age limit, Oct. 9, 1901. Report on the Santiago battle.—The following is the text of Rear-Admiral Schley's report on the destruction of Cervera's fleet: Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, July 6, 1898. The Commander-in-Chief, United States Naval Force, North Atlantic Squadron: Sir,—First. I have the honor to make the following report of that part of the squadron under your command which came under my observation during the engagement with the Spanish fleet on July 3, 1898. Second. At 9.35 A. M. Admiral Cervera, with the Infanta Maria Teresa, the Vizcaya, the Oquendo, the Cristobal Colon, and two torpedo-boat destroyers came out of the harbor of Santiago de Cu
paraiso, Chile, he went to that port in command of the Baltimore and settled the trouble. In August, 1891, the Baltimore, still under his command, was detailed to convey the remains of John Ericsson (q. v.) to Sweden, in recognition of which service he received a gold medal from the King of Sweden. He was promoted commodore in February, 1898, and when the American-Spanish War began was given command of the newly organized Flying Squadron for service off the coasts of the United States and Cuba. This squadron and the North Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Sampson were at first independent of each other, but co-operated in searching for the Spanish squadron under Winfield Scott Schley. Admiral Cervera. On June 29 both fleets were united under the command of Sampson. During the battle which followed the attempt of Admiral Cervera to escape, Rear-Admiral Schley was in immediate command of the American fleet, as Rear-Admiral Sampson, the commander-in-chief of the naval force,
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): entry schley-winfield-scott
Schley, Winfield Scott 1839- Naval officer; born in Frederick county, Md., Oct. 9, 1839; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1860; was with the West Gulf blockading squadron in 1861; took part in the engagements which led to the surrender of Port Hudson, La., in 1863; was promoted lieutenant-commander in 1866, and commander in 1874. He was placed in command of the Arctic relief expedition in 1884, and rescued Lieutenant Greely and six survivors at Cape Sabine. He was promoted captain in 1888, and in 1891, when a number of American sailors were stoned by a mob in Valparaiso, Chile, he went to that port in command of the Baltimore and settled the trouble. In August, 1891, the Baltimore, still under his command, was detailed to convey the remains of John Ericsson (q. v.) to Sweden, in recognition of which service he received a gold medal from the King of Sweden. He was promoted commodore in February, 1898, and when the American-Spanish War began was given command of t
Frederick (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry schley-winfield-scott
Schley, Winfield Scott 1839- Naval officer; born in Frederick county, Md., Oct. 9, 1839; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1860; was with the West Gulf blockading squadron in 1861; took part in the engagements which led to the surrender of Port Hudson, La., in 1863; was promoted lieutenant-commander in 1866, and commander in 1874. He was placed in command of the Arctic relief expedition in 1884, and rescued Lieutenant Greely and six survivors at Cape Sabine. He was promoted captain in 1888, and in 1891, when a number of American sailors were stoned by a mob in Valparaiso, Chile, he went to that port in command of the Baltimore and settled the trouble. In August, 1891, the Baltimore, still under his command, was detailed to convey the remains of John Ericsson (q. v.) to Sweden, in recognition of which service he received a gold medal from the King of Sweden. He was promoted commodore in February, 1898, and when the American-Spanish War began was given command of
sailors were stoned by a mob in Valparaiso, Chile, he went to that port in command of the Baltimore and settled the trouble. In August, 1891, the Baltimore, still under his command, was detailed to convey the remains of John Ericsson (q. v.) to Sweden, in recognition of which service he received a gold medal from the King of Sweden. He was promoted commodore in February, 1898, and when the American-Spanish War began was given command of the newly organized Flying Squadron for service off the Sweden. He was promoted commodore in February, 1898, and when the American-Spanish War began was given command of the newly organized Flying Squadron for service off the coasts of the United States and Cuba. This squadron and the North Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Sampson were at first independent of each other, but co-operated in searching for the Spanish squadron under Winfield Scott Schley. Admiral Cervera. On June 29 both fleets were united under the command of Sampson. During the battle which followed the attempt of Admiral Cervera to escape, Rear-Admiral Schley was in immediate command of the American fleet, as Rear-Admiral Sampson, the co
United States (United States) (search for this): entry schley-winfield-scott
Schley, Winfield Scott 1839- Naval officer; born in Frederick county, Md., Oct. 9, 1839; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1860; was with the West Gulf blockading squadron in 1861; took part in the engagements which led to the surrender of Port Hudson, La., in 1863; was promoted lieutenant-commander in 1866, and commander in 1874. He was placed in command of the Arctic relief expedition in 1884, and rescued Lieutenant Greely and six survivors at Cape Sabine. He was promoted captain in 1888, and in 1891, when a number of American sailors were stoned by a mob in Valparaiso, Chile, he went to that port in command of the Baltimore and settled the trouble. In August, 1891, the Baltimore, still under his command, was detailed to convey the remains of John Ericsson (q. v.) to Sweden, in recognition of which service he received a gold medal from the King of Sweden. He was promoted commodore in February, 1898, and when the American-Spanish War began was given command of
at the United States Naval Academy in 1860; was with the West Gulf blockading squadron in 1861; took part in the engagements which led to the surrender of Port Hudson, La., in 1863; was promoted lieutenant-commander in 1866, and commander in 1874. He was placed in command of the Arctic relief expedition in 1884, and rescued Lieutenant Greely and six survivors at Cape Sabine. He was promoted captain in 1888, and in 1891, when a number of American sailors were stoned by a mob in Valparaiso, Chile, he went to that port in command of the Baltimore and settled the trouble. In August, 1891, the Baltimore, still under his command, was detailed to convey the remains of John Ericsson (q. v.) to Sweden, in recognition of which service he received a gold medal from the King of Sweden. He was promoted commodore in February, 1898, and when the American-Spanish War began was given command of the newly organized Flying Squadron for service off the coasts of the United States and Cuba. This s
Cape Sabine (Alaska, United States) (search for this): entry schley-winfield-scott
Schley, Winfield Scott 1839- Naval officer; born in Frederick county, Md., Oct. 9, 1839; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1860; was with the West Gulf blockading squadron in 1861; took part in the engagements which led to the surrender of Port Hudson, La., in 1863; was promoted lieutenant-commander in 1866, and commander in 1874. He was placed in command of the Arctic relief expedition in 1884, and rescued Lieutenant Greely and six survivors at Cape Sabine. He was promoted captain in 1888, and in 1891, when a number of American sailors were stoned by a mob in Valparaiso, Chile, he went to that port in command of the Baltimore and settled the trouble. In August, 1891, the Baltimore, still under his command, was detailed to convey the remains of John Ericsson (q. v.) to Sweden, in recognition of which service he received a gold medal from the King of Sweden. He was promoted commodore in February, 1898, and when the American-Spanish War began was given command of
Squadron, should have proceeded with utmost despatch off Cienfuegos and should have maintained a close blockade of that port. He should have endeavored on May 23, at Cienfuegos, to obtain information regarding the Spanish squadron by communicat.15 A. M. of that date. He should have proceeded from Cienfuegos to Santiago de Cuba with all despatch, and should have d opinion of the undersigned the passage from Key West to Cienfuegos was made by the Flying Squadron with all possible despatore Schley having In view the importance of arriving off Cienfuegos with as much coal as possible in the ships' bunkers. The blockade of Cienfuegos was effective. Commodore Schley, in permitting the steamer Adula to enter the port of CienfuegCienfuegos, expected to obtain information concerning the Spanish squadron from her when she came out. The passage from CienfuegCienfuegos to a point about 22 miles south of Santiago was made with as much despatch as was possible while keeping the squadron a
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