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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 18 total hits in 8 results.

United States (United States) (search for this): entry shakers
Shakers An English sect, now chiefly found in the United States, arose in the time of Charles I., and derived its name from voluntary convulsions. It soon disappeared, but was revived by James Wardley in 1747, and more successfully by Ann Lee (or Standless), expelled Quakers, about 1757. The sect emigrated to America, May, 1America, May, 1772, and settled near Albany, N. Y., 1774. They have several communities in the United States; they hold all goods in common, live uprightly, and are noted for frugality, industry, integrity, and thrift. They denounce marriage as sinful, regard celibacy as holy, oppose war, disown baptism and the Lord's Supper, and use a sort of y, N. Y., 1774. They have several communities in the United States; they hold all goods in common, live uprightly, and are noted for frugality, industry, integrity, and thrift. They denounce marriage as sinful, regard celibacy as holy, oppose war, disown baptism and the Lord's Supper, and use a sort of dancing as part of worship.
Albany (New York, United States) (search for this): entry shakers
Shakers An English sect, now chiefly found in the United States, arose in the time of Charles I., and derived its name from voluntary convulsions. It soon disappeared, but was revived by James Wardley in 1747, and more successfully by Ann Lee (or Standless), expelled Quakers, about 1757. The sect emigrated to America, May, 1772, and settled near Albany, N. Y., 1774. They have several communities in the United States; they hold all goods in common, live uprightly, and are noted for frugality, industry, integrity, and thrift. They denounce marriage as sinful, regard celibacy as holy, oppose war, disown baptism and the Lord's Supper, and use a sort of dancing as part of worship.
James Wardley (search for this): entry shakers
Shakers An English sect, now chiefly found in the United States, arose in the time of Charles I., and derived its name from voluntary convulsions. It soon disappeared, but was revived by James Wardley in 1747, and more successfully by Ann Lee (or Standless), expelled Quakers, about 1757. The sect emigrated to America, May, 1772, and settled near Albany, N. Y., 1774. They have several communities in the United States; they hold all goods in common, live uprightly, and are noted for frugality, industry, integrity, and thrift. They denounce marriage as sinful, regard celibacy as holy, oppose war, disown baptism and the Lord's Supper, and use a sort of dancing as part of worship.
Shakers An English sect, now chiefly found in the United States, arose in the time of Charles I., and derived its name from voluntary convulsions. It soon disappeared, but was revived by James Wardley in 1747, and more successfully by Ann Lee (or Standless), expelled Quakers, about 1757. The sect emigrated to America, May, 1772, and settled near Albany, N. Y., 1774. They have several communities in the United States; they hold all goods in common, live uprightly, and are noted for frugality, industry, integrity, and thrift. They denounce marriage as sinful, regard celibacy as holy, oppose war, disown baptism and the Lord's Supper, and use a sort of dancing as part of worship.
Shakers An English sect, now chiefly found in the United States, arose in the time of Charles I., and derived its name from voluntary convulsions. It soon disappeared, but was revived by James Wardley in 1747, and more successfully by Ann Lee (or Standless), expelled Quakers, about 1757. The sect emigrated to America, May, 1772, and settled near Albany, N. Y., 1774. They have several communities in the United States; they hold all goods in common, live uprightly, and are noted for frugality, industry, integrity, and thrift. They denounce marriage as sinful, regard celibacy as holy, oppose war, disown baptism and the Lord's Supper, and use a sort of dancing as part of worship.
Shakers An English sect, now chiefly found in the United States, arose in the time of Charles I., and derived its name from voluntary convulsions. It soon disappeared, but was revived by James Wardley in 1747, and more successfully by Ann Lee (or Standless), expelled Quakers, about 1757. The sect emigrated to America, May, 1772, and settled near Albany, N. Y., 1774. They have several communities in the United States; they hold all goods in common, live uprightly, and are noted for frugality, industry, integrity, and thrift. They denounce marriage as sinful, regard celibacy as holy, oppose war, disown baptism and the Lord's Supper, and use a sort of dancing as part of worship.
May, 1772 AD (search for this): entry shakers
Shakers An English sect, now chiefly found in the United States, arose in the time of Charles I., and derived its name from voluntary convulsions. It soon disappeared, but was revived by James Wardley in 1747, and more successfully by Ann Lee (or Standless), expelled Quakers, about 1757. The sect emigrated to America, May, 1772, and settled near Albany, N. Y., 1774. They have several communities in the United States; they hold all goods in common, live uprightly, and are noted for frugality, industry, integrity, and thrift. They denounce marriage as sinful, regard celibacy as holy, oppose war, disown baptism and the Lord's Supper, and use a sort of dancing as part of worship.
Shakers An English sect, now chiefly found in the United States, arose in the time of Charles I., and derived its name from voluntary convulsions. It soon disappeared, but was revived by James Wardley in 1747, and more successfully by Ann Lee (or Standless), expelled Quakers, about 1757. The sect emigrated to America, May, 1772, and settled near Albany, N. Y., 1774. They have several communities in the United States; they hold all goods in common, live uprightly, and are noted for frugality, industry, integrity, and thrift. They denounce marriage as sinful, regard celibacy as holy, oppose war, disown baptism and the Lord's Supper, and use a sort of dancing as part of worship.