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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 65 total hits in 23 results.

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Military officer; born in England, about 1760; became lieutenant-general in the British army in 1811. Early in July, 1814, Commodore Hardy sailed secretly from Halifax, with a considerable land and naval force, and captured Eastport, Me., without much opposition. This easy conquest encouraged the British to attempt the seizure n between Passamaquoddy Bay and the Penobscot River. A strong squadron, under Admiral Griffith, bearing about 4,000 troops, led by Sherbrooke, then governor of Nova Scotia, captured Castine, on Penobscot Bay, and also Belfast, and went up the Penobscot River to Hampden, a few miles below Bangor, to capture or destroy the American at over $20,000. Then they returned to Hampden and there repeated their destructive work. Then the troops and fleet descended the Penobscot, and, after capturing Machias, returned to Halifax. General Gosselin was left to hold the country, which he did with dignity and humanity. Sir John died in Claverton, England, Feb. 14, 1830.
Penobscot (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry sherbrooke-sir-john-coape
led secretly from Halifax, with a considerable land and naval force, and captured Eastport, Me., without much opposition. This easy conquest encouraged the British to attempt the seizure of the whole region between Passamaquoddy Bay and the Penobscot River. A strong squadron, under Admiral Griffith, bearing about 4,000 troops, led by Sherbrooke, then governor of Nova Scotia, captured Castine, on Penobscot Bay, and also Belfast, and went up the Penobscot River to Hampden, a few miles below BanPenobscot River to Hampden, a few miles below Bangor, to capture or destroy the American corvette John Adams, which, caught in that stream, had gone up so far to escape from the British. The militia, called to defend Hampden and the Adams, fled when the British approached, and the object of the latter was accomplished. Captain Morris, commander of the Adams, burned her to prevent her falling into the hands of the British. The latter pressed on to Bangor, where they tarried about Sir John Coape Sherbrooke. thirty hours, destroyed severa
Sherbrooke, Sir John Coape 1760-1830 Military officer; born in England, about 1760; became lieutenant-general in the British army in 1811. Early in July, 1814, Commodore Hardy sailed secretly from Halifax, with a considerable land and naval force, and captured Eastport, Me., without much opposition. This easy conquest encouraged the British to attempt the seizure of the whole region between Passamaquoddy Bay and the Penobscot River. A strong squadron, under Admiral Griffith, bearing about 4,000 troops, led by Sherbrooke, then governor of Nova Scotia, captured Castine, on Penobscot Bay, and also Belfast, and went up the Penobscot River to Hampden, a few miles below Bangor, to capture or destroy the American corvette John Adams, which, caught in that stream, had gone up so far to escape from the British. The militia, called to defend Hampden and the Adams, fled when the British approached, and the object of the latter was accomplished. Captain Morris, commander of the Adams,
Bangor (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry sherbrooke-sir-john-coape
ot River. A strong squadron, under Admiral Griffith, bearing about 4,000 troops, led by Sherbrooke, then governor of Nova Scotia, captured Castine, on Penobscot Bay, and also Belfast, and went up the Penobscot River to Hampden, a few miles below Bangor, to capture or destroy the American corvette John Adams, which, caught in that stream, had gone up so far to escape from the British. The militia, called to defend Hampden and the Adams, fled when the British approached, and the object of the latter was accomplished. Captain Morris, commander of the Adams, burned her to prevent her falling into the hands of the British. The latter pressed on to Bangor, where they tarried about Sir John Coape Sherbrooke. thirty hours, destroyed several vessels at the mouth of the Kenduskeag, and plundered property valued at over $20,000. Then they returned to Hampden and there repeated their destructive work. Then the troops and fleet descended the Penobscot, and, after capturing Machias, returne
Belfast, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry sherbrooke-sir-john-coape
in the British army in 1811. Early in July, 1814, Commodore Hardy sailed secretly from Halifax, with a considerable land and naval force, and captured Eastport, Me., without much opposition. This easy conquest encouraged the British to attempt the seizure of the whole region between Passamaquoddy Bay and the Penobscot River. A strong squadron, under Admiral Griffith, bearing about 4,000 troops, led by Sherbrooke, then governor of Nova Scotia, captured Castine, on Penobscot Bay, and also Belfast, and went up the Penobscot River to Hampden, a few miles below Bangor, to capture or destroy the American corvette John Adams, which, caught in that stream, had gone up so far to escape from the British. The militia, called to defend Hampden and the Adams, fled when the British approached, and the object of the latter was accomplished. Captain Morris, commander of the Adams, burned her to prevent her falling into the hands of the British. The latter pressed on to Bangor, where they tar
Castine (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry sherbrooke-sir-john-coape
bout 1760; became lieutenant-general in the British army in 1811. Early in July, 1814, Commodore Hardy sailed secretly from Halifax, with a considerable land and naval force, and captured Eastport, Me., without much opposition. This easy conquest encouraged the British to attempt the seizure of the whole region between Passamaquoddy Bay and the Penobscot River. A strong squadron, under Admiral Griffith, bearing about 4,000 troops, led by Sherbrooke, then governor of Nova Scotia, captured Castine, on Penobscot Bay, and also Belfast, and went up the Penobscot River to Hampden, a few miles below Bangor, to capture or destroy the American corvette John Adams, which, caught in that stream, had gone up so far to escape from the British. The militia, called to defend Hampden and the Adams, fled when the British approached, and the object of the latter was accomplished. Captain Morris, commander of the Adams, burned her to prevent her falling into the hands of the British. The latter
Machias (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry sherbrooke-sir-john-coape
obscot Bay, and also Belfast, and went up the Penobscot River to Hampden, a few miles below Bangor, to capture or destroy the American corvette John Adams, which, caught in that stream, had gone up so far to escape from the British. The militia, called to defend Hampden and the Adams, fled when the British approached, and the object of the latter was accomplished. Captain Morris, commander of the Adams, burned her to prevent her falling into the hands of the British. The latter pressed on to Bangor, where they tarried about Sir John Coape Sherbrooke. thirty hours, destroyed several vessels at the mouth of the Kenduskeag, and plundered property valued at over $20,000. Then they returned to Hampden and there repeated their destructive work. Then the troops and fleet descended the Penobscot, and, after capturing Machias, returned to Halifax. General Gosselin was left to hold the country, which he did with dignity and humanity. Sir John died in Claverton, England, Feb. 14, 1830.
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry sherbrooke-sir-john-coape
Sherbrooke, Sir John Coape 1760-1830 Military officer; born in England, about 1760; became lieutenant-general in the British army in 1811. Early in July, 1814, Commodore Hardy sailed secretly from Halifax, with a considerable land and naval force, and captured Eastport, Me., without much opposition. This easy conquest encouraged the British to attempt the seizure of the whole region between Passamaquoddy Bay and the Penobscot River. A strong squadron, under Admiral Griffith, bearing aboo Bangor, where they tarried about Sir John Coape Sherbrooke. thirty hours, destroyed several vessels at the mouth of the Kenduskeag, and plundered property valued at over $20,000. Then they returned to Hampden and there repeated their destructive work. Then the troops and fleet descended the Penobscot, and, after capturing Machias, returned to Halifax. General Gosselin was left to hold the country, which he did with dignity and humanity. Sir John died in Claverton, England, Feb. 14, 1830.
Eastport (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry sherbrooke-sir-john-coape
Sherbrooke, Sir John Coape 1760-1830 Military officer; born in England, about 1760; became lieutenant-general in the British army in 1811. Early in July, 1814, Commodore Hardy sailed secretly from Halifax, with a considerable land and naval force, and captured Eastport, Me., without much opposition. This easy conquest encouraged the British to attempt the seizure of the whole region between Passamaquoddy Bay and the Penobscot River. A strong squadron, under Admiral Griffith, bearing about 4,000 troops, led by Sherbrooke, then governor of Nova Scotia, captured Castine, on Penobscot Bay, and also Belfast, and went up the Penobscot River to Hampden, a few miles below Bangor, to capture or destroy the American corvette John Adams, which, caught in that stream, had gone up so far to escape from the British. The militia, called to defend Hampden and the Adams, fled when the British approached, and the object of the latter was accomplished. Captain Morris, commander of the Adams,
Hampden, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry sherbrooke-sir-john-coape
so Belfast, and went up the Penobscot River to Hampden, a few miles below Bangor, to capture or destroy the American corvette John Adams, which, caught in that stream, had gone up so far to escape from the British. The militia, called to defend Hampden and the Adams, fled when the British approached, and the object of the latter was accomplished. Captain Morris, commander of the Adams, burned her to prevent her falling into the hands of the British. The latter pressed on to Bangor, where to Bangor, where they tarried about Sir John Coape Sherbrooke. thirty hours, destroyed several vessels at the mouth of the Kenduskeag, and plundered property valued at over $20,000. Then they returned to Hampden and there repeated their destructive work. Then the troops and fleet descended the Penobscot, and, after capturing Machias, returned to Halifax. General Gosselin was left to hold the country, which he did with dignity and humanity. Sir John died in Claverton, England, Feb. 14, 1830.
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