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both engagements with Fort Fisher. He was promoted captain March 21, 1897, and placed in command of the battle-ship Maine, which was ordered to proceed to Havana in the latter part of January, 1898, for the purpose of paying a ceremonial visit, as is customary among the navies of the world. On the night of Feb. 15, 1898, the Maine was suddenly destroyed at her assigned anchorage in Havana Harbor, by an explosion which drove her hull plates inward and upward (see Cuba). Soon after this catastrophe Captain Sigsbee was placed in command of the auxiliary cruiser St. Paul, and in the latter part of June destroyed the Spanish torpedo-boat Terror off San Juan, Porto Rico. In August of the same year he was assigned to the Texas, and was appointed chief of the bureau of naval intelligence when that vessel was put out of commission in October, 1899. He is the author of Deep sea. Sounding and dredging; United States coast survey, 1880; Personal narrative of the battle-ship Maine, 1899, etc.
both engagements with Fort Fisher. He was promoted captain March 21, 1897, and placed in command of the battle-ship Maine, which was ordered to proceed to Havana in the latter part of January, 1898, for the purpose of paying a ceremonial visit, as is customary among the navies of the world. On the night of Feb. 15, 1898, the Maine was suddenly destroyed at her assigned anchorage in Havana Harbor, by an explosion which drove her hull plates inward and upward (see Cuba). Soon after this catastrophe Captain Sigsbee was placed in command of the auxiliary cruiser St. Paul, and in the latter part of June destroyed the Spanish torpedo-boat Terror off San Juan, Porto Rico. In August of the same year he was assigned to the Texas, and was appointed chief of the bureau of naval intelligence when that vessel was put out of commission in October, 1899. He is the author of Deep sea. Sounding and dredging; United States coast survey, 1880; Personal narrative of the battle-ship Maine, 1899, etc.
February 15th, 1898 AD (search for this): entry sigsbee-charles-dwight
, and served in the West Gulf Squadron in 1863-64, Charles Dwight Sigsbee. taking part in the battle of Mobile Bay; served in the North Atlantic Squadron in 1865, being present at both engagements with Fort Fisher. He was promoted captain March 21, 1897, and placed in command of the battle-ship Maine, which was ordered to proceed to Havana in the latter part of January, 1898, for the purpose of paying a ceremonial visit, as is customary among the navies of the world. On the night of Feb. 15, 1898, the Maine was suddenly destroyed at her assigned anchorage in Havana Harbor, by an explosion which drove her hull plates inward and upward (see Cuba). Soon after this catastrophe Captain Sigsbee was placed in command of the auxiliary cruiser St. Paul, and in the latter part of June destroyed the Spanish torpedo-boat Terror off San Juan, Porto Rico. In August of the same year he was assigned to the Texas, and was appointed chief of the bureau of naval intelligence when that vessel was p
both engagements with Fort Fisher. He was promoted captain March 21, 1897, and placed in command of the battle-ship Maine, which was ordered to proceed to Havana in the latter part of January, 1898, for the purpose of paying a ceremonial visit, as is customary among the navies of the world. On the night of Feb. 15, 1898, the Maine was suddenly destroyed at her assigned anchorage in Havana Harbor, by an explosion which drove her hull plates inward and upward (see Cuba). Soon after this catastrophe Captain Sigsbee was placed in command of the auxiliary cruiser St. Paul, and in the latter part of June destroyed the Spanish torpedo-boat Terror off San Juan, Porto Rico. In August of the same year he was assigned to the Texas, and was appointed chief of the bureau of naval intelligence when that vessel was put out of commission in October, 1899. He is the author of Deep sea. Sounding and dredging; United States coast survey, 1880; Personal narrative of the battle-ship Maine, 1899, etc.
oth engagements with Fort Fisher. He was promoted captain March 21, 1897, and placed in command of the battle-ship Maine, which was ordered to proceed to Havana in the latter part of January, 1898, for the purpose of paying a ceremonial visit, as is customary among the navies of the world. On the night of Feb. 15, 1898, the Maine was suddenly destroyed at her assigned anchorage in Havana Harbor, by an explosion which drove her hull plates inward and upward (see Cuba). Soon after this catastrophe Captain Sigsbee was placed in command of the auxiliary cruiser St. Paul, and in the latter part of June destroyed the Spanish torpedo-boat Terror off San Juan, Porto Rico. In August of the same year he was assigned to the Texas, and was appointed chief of the bureau of naval intelligence when that vessel was put out of commission in October, 1899. He is the author of Deep sea. Sounding and dredging; United States coast survey, 1880; Personal narrative of the battle-ship Maine, 1899, etc.
Sigsbee, Charles Dwight 1845- Naval officer; born in Albany, N. Y., Jan. 16, 1845; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1863; was promoted ensign in October of that year, and served in the West Gulf Squadron in 1863-64, Charles Dwight Sigsbee. taking part in the battle of Mobile Bay; served in the North Atlantic Squadron in 1865, being present at both engagements with Fort Fisher. He was promoted captain March 21, 1897, and placed in command of the battle-ship Maine, which was1863-64, Charles Dwight Sigsbee. taking part in the battle of Mobile Bay; served in the North Atlantic Squadron in 1865, being present at both engagements with Fort Fisher. He was promoted captain March 21, 1897, and placed in command of the battle-ship Maine, which was ordered to proceed to Havana in the latter part of January, 1898, for the purpose of paying a ceremonial visit, as is customary among the navies of the world. On the night of Feb. 15, 1898, the Maine was suddenly destroyed at her assigned anchorage in Havana Harbor, by an explosion which drove her hull plates inward and upward (see Cuba). Soon after this catastrophe Captain Sigsbee was placed in command of the auxiliary cruiser St. Paul, and in the latter part of June destroyed the Spanish to
Sigsbee, Charles Dwight 1845- Naval officer; born in Albany, N. Y., Jan. 16, 1845; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1863; was promoted ensign in October of that year, and served in the West Gulf Squadron in 1863-64, Charles Dwight Sigsbee. taking part in the battle of Mobile Bay; served in the North Atlantic Squadron in 1865, being present at both engagements with Fort Fisher. He was promoted captain March 21, 1897, and placed in command of the battle-ship Maine, which was ordered to proceed to Havana in the latter part of January, 1898, for the purpose of paying a ceremonial visit, as is customary among the navies of the world. On the night of Feb. 15, 1898, the Maine was suddenly destroyed at her assigned anchorage in Havana Harbor, by an explosion which drove her hull plates inward and upward (see Cuba). Soon after this catastrophe Captain Sigsbee was placed in command of the auxiliary cruiser St. Paul, and in the latter part of June destroyed the Spanish to
Sigsbee, Charles Dwight 1845- Naval officer; born in Albany, N. Y., Jan. 16, 1845; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1863; was promoted ensign in October of that year, and served in the West Gulf Squadron in 1863-64, Charles Dwight Sigsbee. taking part in the battle of Mobile Bay; served in the North Atlantic Squadron in 1865, being present at both engagements with Fort Fisher. He was promoted captain March 21, 1897, and placed in command of the battle-ship Maine, which was ordered to proceed to Havana in the latter part of January, 1898, for the purpose of paying a ceremonial visit, as is customary among the navies of the world. On the night of Feb. 15, 1898, the Maine was suddenly destroyed at her assigned anchorage in Havana Harbor, by an explosion which drove her hull plates inward and upward (see Cuba). Soon after this catastrophe Captain Sigsbee was placed in command of the auxiliary cruiser St. Paul, and in the latter part of June destroyed the Spanish to
Sigsbee, Charles Dwight 1845- Naval officer; born in Albany, N. Y., Jan. 16, 1845; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1863; was promoted ensign in October of that year, and served in the West Gulf Squadron in 1863-64, Charles Dwight Sigsbee. taking part in the battle of Mobile Bay; served in the North Atlantic Squadron in 1865, being present at both engagements with Fort Fisher. He was promoted captain March 21, 1897, and placed in command of the battle-ship Maine, which was ordered to proceed to Havana in the latter part of January, 1898, for the purpose of paying a ceremonial visit, as is customary among the navies of the world. On the night of Feb. 15, 1898, the Maine was suddenly destroyed at her assigned anchorage in Havana Harbor, by an explosion which drove her hull plates inward and upward (see Cuba). Soon after this catastrophe Captain Sigsbee was placed in command of the auxiliary cruiser St. Paul, and in the latter part of June destroyed the Spanish t
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