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Frankland (Western Australia, Australia) (search for this): entry state-of-tennessee
l Valley and began a settlement in the southwest corner of State seal of Tennessee. Virginia. These early settlers were known as the Watauga Association from 1769 to 1777. The territory was represented in the North Carolina legislature as the District of Washington. In 1785 the State of Frankland (q. v.) was organized, but was reunited with North Carolina in 1788, and the next year that State ceded the territory to the national government. John Sevier (q. v.), first governor of Frankland, stands out as one of the most prominent and picturesque figures in the early and formative history of Tennessee. He was called the greatest of Indian fighters, having fought against the savage Creeks, Choctaws, and Cherokees— the bravest, most warlike, and most blood-thirsty of all the native tribes east of the Mississippi. The settlers were constantly menaced by them, and nothing had saved the stouthearted pioneers from total extermination except their rude log forts and the sleepless
th1796 to 1797 William Cocke4th to 9th1796 to 1805 Joseph Anderson5th1797 to 1798 Andrew Jackson5th1797 to 1798 Daniel Smith5th1798 Joseph Anderson6th to 14th1799 to 1815 Daniel Smith9th to 11th1805 to 1809 Jenkin Whiteside11th to 12th1809 to 1811 George W. Campbell12th to 13th1811 to 1814 Jesse Wharton13th to 14th1814 to 1815 John Williams14th to 18th1815 to 1823 George W. Campbell14th to 15th1815 to 1818 United States Senators—--continued. Name.No. of Congress.Term. John Henry Eaton15th to 21st1818 to 1829 Andrew Jackson18th to 19th1823 to 1825 Hugh Lawson White19th to 26th1825 to 1840 Felix Grundy21st to 25th1829 to 1838 Ephraim H. Foster25th to 26th1838 to 1839 Alexander Anderson26th to 27th1840 to 1841 Felix Grundy26th1839 to 1840 Alfred O. P. Nicholson26th to 28th1841 to 1843 Ephraim H. Foster28th to 29th1843 to 1845 Spencer Jarnagin28th to 30th1843 to 1847 Hopkins L. Turney29th to 32d1845 to 1851 John Bell30th to 36th1847 to 1859 James C. Jones32d
, 1796 Archibald RoaneAssumes officeSept., 1801 John SevierAssumes officeSept., 1803 William BlountAssumes officeSept., 1809 Joseph McMinnAssumes officeSept., 1815 William CarrollAssumes officeSept., 1821 Samuel HoustonAssumes officeSept., 1827 William CarrollAssumes officeSept., 1829 Newton CannonAssumes officeOct., 1835 James K. PolkAssumes officeOct., 1839 James C. JonesAssumes officeOct., 1841 Aaron V. BrownAssumes officeOct., 1845 Neil S. BrownAssumes officeOct., 1847 William TrousdaleAssumes officeOct., 1849 William B. CampbellAssumes officeOct., 1851 Andrew JohnsonAssumes officeOct., 1853 Isham G. HarrisAssumes officeOct., 1857 Andrew JohnsonAssumes officeprov. March 12, 1861 W. G. BrownlowAssumes officeApril, 1865 DeWitt C. SenterAssumes officeOct., 1869 John C. BrownAssumes officeOct., 1871 James D. Porter, JrAssumes officeJan., 1875 Albert S. MarksAssumes officeJan., 1879 Alvin HawkinsAssumes officeJan., 1881 William B. BateAssumes officeJan., 1883
William B. Campbell (search for this): entry state-of-tennessee
1801 John SevierAssumes officeSept., 1803 William BlountAssumes officeSept., 1809 Joseph McMinnAssumes officeSept., 1815 William CarrollAssumes officeSept., 1821 Samuel HoustonAssumes officeSept., 1827 William CarrollAssumes officeSept., 1829 Newton CannonAssumes officeOct., 1835 James K. PolkAssumes officeOct., 1839 James C. JonesAssumes officeOct., 1841 Aaron V. BrownAssumes officeOct., 1845 Neil S. BrownAssumes officeOct., 1847 William TrousdaleAssumes officeOct., 1849 William B. CampbellAssumes officeOct., 1851 Andrew JohnsonAssumes officeOct., 1853 Isham G. HarrisAssumes officeOct., 1857 Andrew JohnsonAssumes officeprov. March 12, 1861 W. G. BrownlowAssumes officeApril, 1865 DeWitt C. SenterAssumes officeOct., 1869 John C. BrownAssumes officeOct., 1871 James D. Porter, JrAssumes officeJan., 1875 Albert S. MarksAssumes officeJan., 1879 Alvin HawkinsAssumes officeJan., 1881 William B. BateAssumes officeJan., 1883 Robert L. TaylorAssumes officeJan., 1887 Jo
1840 Felix Grundy21st to 25th1829 to 1838 Ephraim H. Foster25th to 26th1838 to 1839 Alexander Anderson26th to 27th1840 to 1841 Felix Grundy26th1839 to 1840 Alfred O. P. Nicholson26th to 28th1841 to 1843 Ephraim H. Foster28th to 29th1843 to 1845 Spencer Jarnagin28th to 30th1843 to 1847 Hopkins L. Turney29th to 32d1845 to 1851 John Bell30th to 36th1847 to 1859 James C. Jones32d to 35th1851 to 1857 Andrew Johnson35th to 38th1857 to 1862 Alfred O. P. Nicholson36th1859 to 1861 37th and 38th Congresses vacant. David T. Patterson39th to 41st1866 to 1869 Joseph S. Fowler39th to 42d1866 to 1871 William G. Brownlow41st to 44th1869 to 1875 Henry Cooper42d to 45th1871 to 1877 Andrew Johnson44th1875 David McKendree Keyto1875 to 1877 James E. Bailey44th to 47th1877 to 1881 Isham G. Harris45th to 54th1877 to 1897 Howell E. Jackson47th to 49th1881 to 1886 Washington C. Whitthorne49th to 50th1886 to 1888 William B. Bate50th to ——1888 to —— Thomas B. Turley54th to —
Nathan Bedford Forrest (search for this): entry state-of-tennessee
armies continued from January until June, 1863. Meanwhile detached parties were very active in various parts of Tennessee. At the beginning of February (1863), General Wheeler, Bragg's chief of artillery, with 4,500 mounted men, with Brigadier-Generals Forrest and Wharton, attempted to recapture Fort Donelson. The chief object of the Confederates there was to interrupt the navigation of the Cumberland River, and thus interfere with the transportation of supplies for Rosecrans's army. The Co Wheeler's men. Later, Gen. Earl Van Dorn, with a large mounted force, was hovering near Franklin, below Nashville. Sheridan, at Murfreesboro, and Colonel Colburn, at Franklin, marched simultaneously to confront him. Van Dorn was accompanied by Forrest. Colburn, with 2,700 men, moved against Van Dorn at Spring Hill, but failed to form a junction with Sheridan. After a sharp encounter he was forced to surrender (March 5) about 1,300 of his infantry. The remainder, with the cavalry, escaped.
st of the OhioAug. 7, 1790 State governors. John SevierAssumes officeMarch 30, 1796 Archibald RoaneAssumes officeSept., 1801 John SevierAssumes officeSept., 1803 William BlountAssumes officeSept., 1809 Joseph McMinnAssumes officeSept., 1815 William CarrollAssumes officeSept., 1821 Samuel HoustonAssumes officeSept., 1827 William CarrollAssumes officeSept., 1829 Newton CannonAssumes officeOct., 1835 James K. PolkAssumes officeOct., 1839 James C. JonesAssumes officeOct., 1841 Aaron V. BrownAssumes officeOct., 1845 Neil S. BrownAssumes officeOct., 1847 William TrousdaleAssumes officeOct., 1849 William B. CampbellAssumes officeOct., 1851 Andrew JohnsonAssumes officeOct., 1853 Isham G. HarrisAssumes officeOct., 1857 Andrew JohnsonAssumes officeprov. March 12, 1861 W. G. BrownlowAssumes officeApril, 1865 DeWitt C. SenterAssumes officeOct., 1869 John C. BrownAssumes officeOct., 1871 James D. Porter, JrAssumes officeJan., 1875 Albert S. MarksAssumes officeJan., 1879
823 George W. Campbell14th to 15th1815 to 1818 United States Senators—--continued. Name.No. of Congress.Term. John Henry Eaton15th to 21st1818 to 1829 Andrew Jackson18th to 19th1823 to 1825 Hugh Lawson White19th to 26th1825 to 1840 Felix Grundy21st to 25th1829 to 1838 Ephraim H. Foster25th to 26th1838 to 1839 Alexander Anderson26th to 27th1840 to 1841 Felix Grundy26th1839 to 1840 Alfred O. P. Nicholson26th to 28th1841 to 1843 Ephraim H. Foster28th to 29th1843 to 1845 Spencer JaFelix Grundy26th1839 to 1840 Alfred O. P. Nicholson26th to 28th1841 to 1843 Ephraim H. Foster28th to 29th1843 to 1845 Spencer Jarnagin28th to 30th1843 to 1847 Hopkins L. Turney29th to 32d1845 to 1851 John Bell30th to 36th1847 to 1859 James C. Jones32d to 35th1851 to 1857 Andrew Johnson35th to 38th1857 to 1862 Alfred O. P. Nicholson36th1859 to 1861 37th and 38th Congresses vacant. David T. Patterson39th to 41st1866 to 1869 Joseph S. Fowler39th to 42d1866 to 1871 William G. Brownlow41st to 44th1869 to 1875 Henry Cooper42d to 45th1871 to 1877 Andrew Johnson44th1875 David McKendree Keyto1875 to 1877 James E. Bai
s ingenious and dramatic rescue by a party headed by one of his lieutenants, James Cosby. The trial was in progress at Morganton, and many thousands had come togethin a clump of underbrush, left them there in charge of the young Seviers. Then Cosby and Evans, disguised as countrymen, entered the town. When they arrived at they before the open door and in plain view of the interior of the building. Then Cosby entered the courtroom, and, elbowing his way up the crowded aisle, halted direchis beloved leader stood encompassed by the court officials. Catching his eye, Cosby, by a significant gesture, directed Sevier's attention to his horse, that Wa the quick eye of Sevier took in the situation. Seeing that he was understood, Cosby pressed closer to the bench, and in quick, energetic tones said to the judge: Aner of the speaker, drew all eyes upon him in amazement. For a few moments—as Cosby had intended—all was confusion. Taking instant advantage of this, Sevier spran
and disembarked, when they met an order from Wilkinson to halt there and await further orders, as he had no instructions concerning their employment; nor had he quarters for their accommodation. There Jackson and his men waited until March 1, when he wrote to the Secretary of War, saying he saw little chance for the employment of his small army in the South, and suggested that they might be used in the North. Day after day he waited anxiously for an answer. At length one came from John Armstrong, the new Secretary of War, who wrote simply that the causes of calling out the Tennessee volunteers to march to New Orleans had ceased to exist, and that on the receipt of that letter they would be dismissed from public service. He was directed to turn over to General Wilkinson all public property that may have been put into his hands. The letter concluded with the tender of cold and formal thanks of the President to Jackson and his troops. The hero's anger was fiercely kindled becaus
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