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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

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States-General of Holland, One of the five chief powers of the government of the Netherlands, established after the declaration of their national independence. These powers were the States-General, the Council of State, the Chamber of Accounts, the Stadtholder, and the College of the Admiralty. The States-General usually sat at The Hague. It was not in any true sense a representative body, but rather a deputation. It had no claim to sovereignty. It obeyed the instructions of its constituents to the letter. When new subjects were introduced for consideration, the States-General applied to the provinces for direction. Neither war nor peace could be made without unanimous consent of the provinces, nor troops raised without the same unanimity. The States-General constituted a congress of the same general character of that of the United States under the Articles of Confederation.
States-General of Holland, One of the five chief powers of the government of the Netherlands, established after the declaration of their national independence. These powers were the States-General, the Council of State, the Chamber of Accounts, the Stadtholder, and the College of the Admiralty. The States-General usually sat at The Hague. It was not in any true sense a representative body, but rather a deputation. It had no claim to sovereignty. It obeyed the instructions of its constituents to the letter. When new subjects were introduced for consideration, the States-General applied to the provinces for direction. Neither war nor peace could be made without unanimous consent of the provinces, nor troops raised without the same unanimity. The States-General constituted a congress of the same general character of that of the United States under the Articles of Confederation.
United States (United States) (search for this): entry states-general-of-holland
States-General of Holland, One of the five chief powers of the government of the Netherlands, established after the declaration of their national independence. These powers were the States-General, the Council of State, the Chamber of Accounts, the Stadtholder, and the College of the Admiralty. The States-General usually sat at The Hague. It was not in any true sense a representative body, but rather a deputation. It had no claim to sovereignty. It obeyed the instructions of its constituents to the letter. When new subjects were introduced for consideration, the States-General applied to the provinces for direction. Neither war nor peace could be made without unanimous consent of the provinces, nor troops raised without the same unanimity. The States-General constituted a congress of the same general character of that of the United States under the Articles of Confederation.