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. In this doctrine and belief he always acted consistently. Though small in stature and weak in constitution, he gave many instances of personal courage. He entered the legislature of Georgia as a member in 1834, and remained there until 1841. In 1842 he was elected to the State Senate; and from 1843 to 1859 was a Representative in Congress, where he was an able and industrious worker on committees, and fluent in debate. He favored the annexation of Texas; supported Clay for President in 1844; took a leading part in effecting the compromises of 1850; and was an active supporter of the Kansas-Nebraska act. When the old Whig party broke up, he joined the Democrats, and was a firm supporter of Buchanan's administration. He favored Douglas's election to the Presidency, and in various public addresses denounced those who advocated a Alexander Hamilton Stephens. dissolulion of the Union. On this subject he and Robert Toombs, of Georgia, were diametrically opposed, and at public
1865. He published History of the War between the States. In 1866 he was chosen a delegate to the Philadelphia National Union convention. In 1877 he represented Georgia in Congress, and retained his seat until elected governor of that State in 1882. He died in Atlanta, Ga., March 4, 1883. Slavery the corner-stone. In a speech delivered to the citizens of Savannah, Ga., in 1861, Vice-President Stephens declared the principles upon which the Southern Confederacy had been founded in the s, he rapidly regained the confidence of the people of his State, and in 1873 was elected from the old 8th District, which he had so faithfully represented before the war, to fill an unexpired term in Congress. He was elected and re-elected until 1882, when he was chosen governor of his State by a very large majority. It was not ordained that he should live through his term. In Atlanta, the capital of his native and beloved Georgia, at half-past 3 o'clock on the morning of Sunday, March 4,
round numbers, has but 212,000 square miles. Austria, in round numbers, has 248,000 square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain, including England, Ireland, and Scotland together. In population we have upward of 5,000,000, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original thirteen States was less than 4,000,000 in 1790, and still less in 1776, when the independence of our fathers was achieved. If they, with a less population, dared maintain their independence against the greatest power on earth, shall we have any apprehension of maintaining ours now? Mr. Howard Carroll contributes the following appreciation of Mr. Stephens as a statesman: Alexander H. Stephens was one of the first public men in the country who had the foresight to fear that the agitation of the slavery question would ultimately result in a fratricidal st
trangers the home of his childhood at Crawfordsville. In early manhood he adopted the doctrine of State sovereignty (q. v.) in all its breadth, and always believed in the righteousness of slavery. In this doctrine and belief he always acted consistently. Though small in stature and weak in constitution, he gave many instances of personal courage. He entered the legislature of Georgia as a member in 1834, and remained there until 1841. In 1842 he was elected to the State Senate; and from 1843 to 1859 was a Representative in Congress, where he was an able and industrious worker on committees, and fluent in debate. He favored the annexation of Texas; supported Clay for President in 1844; took a leading part in effecting the compromises of 1850; and was an active supporter of the Kansas-Nebraska act. When the old Whig party broke up, he joined the Democrats, and was a firm supporter of Buchanan's administration. He favored Douglas's election to the Presidency, and in various p
or one, though my views might not agree with theirs, whatever the result may be, I shall bow to the will of the people of my State. A month later Mr. Stephens was vice-president of the Provisional Confederate Government. After the war Mr. Stephens was confined some time as a state prisoner in Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor, but was released Oct. 11, 1865. He published History of the War between the States. In 1866 he was chosen a delegate to the Philadelphia National Union convention. In 1877 he represented Georgia in Congress, and retained his seat until elected governor of that State in 1882. He died in Atlanta, Ga., March 4, 1883. Slavery the corner-stone. In a speech delivered to the citizens of Savannah, Ga., in 1861, Vice-President Stephens declared the principles upon which the Southern Confederacy had been founded in the following words: The new constitution has put at rest forever all the agitating questions relating to our peculiar institutions—African slaver
Though small in stature and weak in constitution, he gave many instances of personal courage. He entered the legislature of Georgia as a member in 1834, and remained there until 1841. In 1842 he was elected to the State Senate; and from 1843 to 1859 was a Representative in Congress, where he was an able and industrious worker on committees, and fluent in debate. He favored the annexation of Texas; supported Clay for President in 1844; took a leading part in effecting the compromises of 1850; and was an active supporter of the Kansas-Nebraska act. When the old Whig party broke up, he joined the Democrats, and was a firm supporter of Buchanan's administration. He favored Douglas's election to the Presidency, and in various public addresses denounced those who advocated a Alexander Hamilton Stephens. dissolulion of the Union. On this subject he and Robert Toombs, of Georgia, were diametrically opposed, and at public meetings during the autumn and winter of 1860-61 these popu
ance to his State, acquiesced in it and signed it. In his speech against it, he had said, Should Georgia determine to go out of the Union, I speak for one, though my views might not agree with theirs, whatever the result may be, I shall bow to the will of the people of my State. A month later Mr. Stephens was vice-president of the Provisional Confederate Government. After the war Mr. Stephens was confined some time as a state prisoner in Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor, but was released Oct. 11, 1865. He published History of the War between the States. In 1866 he was chosen a delegate to the Philadelphia National Union convention. In 1877 he represented Georgia in Congress, and retained his seat until elected governor of that State in 1882. He died in Atlanta, Ga., March 4, 1883. Slavery the corner-stone. In a speech delivered to the citizens of Savannah, Ga., in 1861, Vice-President Stephens declared the principles upon which the Southern Confederacy had been founded in th
ruggle. Thus fearing, he never lost an opportunity of counselling moderation and forbearance. This, there can be no doubt, he did disinterestedly, and without for a moment believing that the result of such a struggle would be the downfall of the slave-holding power. He, like most political leaders, both North and South, was assured, even on the eve of the war, that the divine institution of slavery could not be overthrown. In an open letter to a number of his constituents, written in May, 1860, he says upon this subject: The times, as you intimate, do indeed portend evil, but I have no fears for the institution of slavery either in the Union or out of it, if our people are all true to themselves—true, stable, and loyal to fixed principles and a settled policy. If they are not thus true, I have little hope of anything good, whether the present Union last or a new one be founded. There is, in my judgment, nothing to fear from the irrepressible conflict of which we hear so much.
a, and taken to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. After his release he wrote a history of the war, and for a time edited a newspaper in Atlanta. He opposed the new departure in the South which favored the election of Horace Greeley to the Presidency, and from the first predicted Grant's triumph. His action in this direction was bitterly denounced by Democrats, North and South; but the result proving the wisdom of his views, he rapidly regained the confidence of the people of his State, and in 1873 was elected from the old 8th District, which he had so faithfully represented before the war, to fill an unexpired term in Congress. He was elected and re-elected until 1882, when he was chosen governor of his State by a very large majority. It was not ordained that he should live through his term. In Atlanta, the capital of his native and beloved Georgia, at half-past 3 o'clock on the morning of Sunday, March 4, 1883, his wonderful brain, his wonderful will power, could no longer keep
Stephens, Alexander Hamilton -1883 Statesman; born near Crawfordsville, Ga., Feb. 11, 1812; was educated at Franklin College, and graduated in 1832. Being left an orphan, he was indebted to the care of friends for his education and youthful training for usefulness. He was admitted to the practice of the law in 1834 at Crawfordsville, and soon rose to eminence. His first care was to reimburse expenditures by his friends and to purchase from the hands of strangers the home of his childhood at Crawfordsville. In early manhood he adopted the doctrine of State sovereignty (q. v.) in all its breadth, and always believed in the righteousness of slavery. In this doctrine and belief he always acted consistently. Though small in stature and weak in constitution, he gave many instances of personal courage. He entered the legislature of Georgia as a member in 1834, and remained there until 1841. In 1842 he was elected to the State Senate; and from 1843 to 1859 was a Representative i
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