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Crawfordsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry stephens-alexander-hamilton
Stephens, Alexander Hamilton -1883 Statesman; born near Crawfordsville, Ga., Feb. 11, 1812; was educated at Franklin College, and graduated in 1832. Being left an orphan, he was indebted to the care of friends for his education and youthful training for usefulness. He was admitted to the practice of the law in 1834 at Crawfordsville, and soon rose to eminence. His first care was to reimburse expenditures by his friends and to purchase from the hands of strangers the home of his childhood at Crawfordsville. In early manhood he adopted the doctrine of State sovereignty (q. v.) in all its breadth, and always believed in the righteousness of slavery. In this doctrine and belief he always acted consistently. Though small in stature about Mr. Davis's nomination for President can be told in few words. Robert Toombs and I, as we got upon the cars at Crawfordsville, on our way to Montgomery, met Mr. Chestnut. The latter said that the South Carolina delegation had talked the matov
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): entry stephens-alexander-hamilton
It was then suggested that the election should take place the next day, at 12 M., and in the mean time the delegations should consult separately. The Georgia delegation met at ten o'clock on the morning of the day of the election. I proposed that we put in the name of Mr. Toombs for the Presidency, and asked him if he would have it. He said he would accept it if it was cordially offered him. Mr. T. Cobb and F. T. Bartow said that the delegations of Florida, Alabama, South Carolina, and Louisiana had conferred, and agreed to support Mr. Davis. Mr. Toombs seemed very incredulous of this, and his manner indicated some surprise. I did not understand this then, but did afterwards. The statement was reiterated; and upon it the delegation forbore to nominate Mr. Toombs, but determined to appoint a committee to ascertain if the report was true. Mr. Kenan then proposed that if it should be correct I should be put forward for Vice-President. Judge Nisbet said, I second that heartily! M
Milledgeville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry stephens-alexander-hamilton
winter of 1860-61 these popular leaders had strong contentions in public, Stephens always setting forth the beneficence and value of the Union, Toombs denouncing it as an oppressor and a hinderance to the progress of Georgia. In a speech at Milledgeville opposing secession. Stephens said, Some of our public men have failed in their aspirations. That is true, and from that comes a great part of our troubles. Toombs was present, and keenly felt this thrust at demagogues of every hue. When, to strife, dissension, disorder, and anarchy. It is against this tendency that the sober-minded, reflecting men everywhere should now be called upon to guard. Prior to the writing of this letter, and just after the delivery of his great Milledgeville speech, in which he expressed similar views, Mr. Stephens received from the then President-elect Lincoln a note asking for a revised copy of that speech. To this Mr. Stephens replied in a letter which concludes with these words: The country
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): entry stephens-alexander-hamilton
go into the election of chief officers. It was then suggested that the election should take place the next day, at 12 M., and in the mean time the delegations should consult separately. The Georgia delegation met at ten o'clock on the morning of the day of the election. I proposed that we put in the name of Mr. Toombs for the Presidency, and asked him if he would have it. He said he would accept it if it was cordially offered him. Mr. T. Cobb and F. T. Bartow said that the delegations of Florida, Alabama, South Carolina, and Louisiana had conferred, and agreed to support Mr. Davis. Mr. Toombs seemed very incredulous of this, and his manner indicated some surprise. I did not understand this then, but did afterwards. The statement was reiterated; and upon it the delegation forbore to nominate Mr. Toombs, but determined to appoint a committee to ascertain if the report was true. Mr. Kenan then proposed that if it should be correct I should be put forward for Vice-President. Judge
rritory of France or the Austrian Empire. France, in round numbers, has but 212,000 square miles. Austria, in round numbers, has 248,000 square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain, including England, Ireland, and Scotland together. In population we have upward of 5,000,000, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original thirteen StatesEngland, Ireland, and Scotland together. In population we have upward of 5,000,000, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original thirteen States was less than 4,000,000 in 1790, and still less in 1776, when the independence of our fathers was achieved. If they, with a less population, dared maintain their independence against the greatest power on earth, shall we have any apprehension of maintaining ours now? Mr. Howard Carroll contributes the following appreciation of Mr. Stephens as a statesman: Alexander H. Stephens was one of the first public men in the country who had the foresight to fear that the agitation of the slave
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry stephens-alexander-hamilton
embrace 564,000 square miles and upward. This is upwards of 200,000 square miles more than was included within the limits of the original thirteen States. It is an area of country more than double the territory of France or the Austrian Empire. France, in round numbers, has but 212,000 square miles. Austria, in round numbers, has 248,000 square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain, including England, Ireland, and Scotland together. In population we have upward of 5,000,000, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original thirteen States was less than 4,000,000 in 1790, and still less in 1776, when the independence of our fathers was achieved. If they, with a less population, dared maintain their independence against the greatest power on earth, shall we have any apprehension of maintaining ours now? Mr. Howard Carroll co
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): entry stephens-alexander-hamilton
he election of chief officers. It was then suggested that the election should take place the next day, at 12 M., and in the mean time the delegations should consult separately. The Georgia delegation met at ten o'clock on the morning of the day of the election. I proposed that we put in the name of Mr. Toombs for the Presidency, and asked him if he would have it. He said he would accept it if it was cordially offered him. Mr. T. Cobb and F. T. Bartow said that the delegations of Florida, Alabama, South Carolina, and Louisiana had conferred, and agreed to support Mr. Davis. Mr. Toombs seemed very incredulous of this, and his manner indicated some surprise. I did not understand this then, but did afterwards. The statement was reiterated; and upon it the delegation forbore to nominate Mr. Toombs, but determined to appoint a committee to ascertain if the report was true. Mr. Kenan then proposed that if it should be correct I should be put forward for Vice-President. Judge Nisbet sa
Fort Warren (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry stephens-alexander-hamilton
whatever the result may be, I shall bow to the will of the people of my State. A month later Mr. Stephens was vice-president of the Provisional Confederate Government. After the war Mr. Stephens was confined some time as a state prisoner in Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor, but was released Oct. 11, 1865. He published History of the War between the States. In 1866 he was chosen a delegate to the Philadelphia National Union convention. In 1877 he represented Georgia in Congress, and retained ia delegation, and that Mr. Davis was not their choice. Toombs was the choice of the Florida, the Louisiana, and the South Carolina delegations. In May, 1865, Mr. Stephens was arrested by federal troops at his home in Georgia, and taken to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. After his release he wrote a history of the war, and for a time edited a newspaper in Atlanta. He opposed the new departure in the South which favored the election of Horace Greeley to the Presidency, and from the first pr
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry stephens-alexander-hamilton
r the war Mr. Stephens was confined some time as a state prisoner in Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor, but was released Oct. 11, 1865. He published History of the War between the States. In 1866 he was chosen a delegate to the Philadelphia National Union convention. In 1877 he represented Georgia in Congress, and retained his seat until elected governor of that State in 1882. He died in Atlanta, Ga., March 4, 1883. Slavery the corner-stone. In a speech delivered to the citizens of Savannah, Ga., in 1861, Vice-President Stephens declared the principles upon which the Southern Confederacy had been founded in the following words: The new constitution has put at rest forever all the agitating questions relating to our peculiar institutions—African slavery as it exists among us—the proper status of the negro in our form of civilization. This was the immediate cause of the late rupture and present revolution. Jefferson, in his forecast, had anticipated this, as the rock upon w
ea has been given out at the North, and even in the Border States, that we are too small and too weak to maintain a separate nationality. This is a great mistake. In extent of territory we embrace 564,000 square miles and upward. This is upwards of 200,000 square miles more than was included within the limits of the original thirteen States. It is an area of country more than double the territory of France or the Austrian Empire. France, in round numbers, has but 212,000 square miles. Austria, in round numbers, has 248,000 square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain, including England, Ireland, and Scotland together. In population we have upward of 5,000,000, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original thirteen States was less than 4,000,000 in 1790, and still less in 1776, when the independence of our fathers was achie
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