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Trenton Falls (New York, United States) (search for this): entry steuben-frederick-william-augustus-baron-von
nd lived there until his death, Nov. 28, 1794. He gave a tenth of his estate to his aides—North, Popham, and Walker—and his servants, and parcelled the remainder among twenty or thirty tenants. He was generous, witty, cheerful, and of polished manners. Steuben was buried in his garden at Steubenville. Afterwards, agreeably to his desires, his aides had his remains wrapped in his cloak, placed in a plain coffin, and buried in a grave in the town of Steuben, about 7 miles northwest of Trenton Falls. There, in 1826, a monument was erected over his grave by private subscription, the recumbent slab bearing only his name and title. His grateful aide, Colonel North, caused a great mural monument to be erected to his memory upon the walls of the German Reformed Church edifice in Nassau Street, between John Street and Maiden Lane, New York City, with a long and eulogistic inscription. On the day that Washington resigned his commission as commanderin-chief he wrote to Steuben, making
ctor-general of the army with the rank of majorgeneral in March, 1778, and fought as a volunteer in the battle of Monmouth in June. Steuben introduced thorough discipline in the army, and prepared a manual of tactics which was approved by Congress. He Steuben's log-house. commanded in Virginia in 1781, and was distinguished at Yorktown in October. The State of New Jersey gave him a small farm at the close of the war, and the State of New York gave him 16,000 acres of wild land in Oneida county. The national government gave him an annuity of $2,500. He withdrew from society, built a log-house on his domain in New York (afterwards Steubenville), and lived there until his death, Nov. 28, 1794. He gave a tenth of his estate to his aides—North, Popham, and Walker—and his servants, and parcelled the remainder among twenty or thirty tenants. He was generous, witty, cheerful, and of polished manners. Steuben was buried in his garden at Steubenville. Afterwards, agreeably to his d
s desires, his aides had his remains wrapped in his cloak, placed in a plain coffin, and buried in a grave in the town of Steuben, about 7 miles northwest of Trenton Falls. There, in 1826, a monument was erected over his grave by private subscription, the recumbent slab bearing only his name and title. His grateful aide, Colonel North, caused a great mural monument to be erected to his memory upon the walls of the German Reformed Church edifice in Nassau Street, between John Street and Maiden Lane, New York City, with a long and eulogistic inscription. On the day that Washington resigned his commission as commanderin-chief he wrote to Steuben, making full acknowledgment of the valuable services rendered by him in the course of the war. As a proper testimonial of Steuben's merits in a military capacity, the letter is here inserted. Annapolis, Dec. 23, 1783. my dear Baron,—Although I have taken frequent opportunities, in public and private, of acknowledging your great zeal
Steuben, Frederick William Augustus, Baron von 1730- Military officer; born in Magdeburg, Prussia, Nov. 15, 1730; educated at Neisse and Breslau. At the siege of Prague he was, at the age of fourteen years, a volunteer under his father, and was so distinguished at Prague and Rossbach in 1757 that he was made adjutant-general the next year. In 1761 he was sent prisoner to St. Petersburg, but was soon released, and in 1762 was placed on the staff of Frederick the Great of Prussia. In 1764 he was appointed grand-marshal and general of the guard of the Prince of Hohenzollern-Hechingen, who made him a knight of the Order of Fidelity. Leaving an ample income, he came to America late in Baron Von Steuben. 1777 (arriving at Portsmouth, N. H., in November), and joined the army under Washington at Valley Forge. He was appointed inspector-general of the army with the rank of majorgeneral in March, 1778, and fought as a volunteer in the battle of Monmouth in June. Steuben introduced
Saint Petersburg (Florida, United States) (search for this): entry steuben-frederick-william-augustus-baron-von
Steuben, Frederick William Augustus, Baron von 1730- Military officer; born in Magdeburg, Prussia, Nov. 15, 1730; educated at Neisse and Breslau. At the siege of Prague he was, at the age of fourteen years, a volunteer under his father, and was so distinguished at Prague and Rossbach in 1757 that he was made adjutant-general the next year. In 1761 he was sent prisoner to St. Petersburg, but was soon released, and in 1762 was placed on the staff of Frederick the Great of Prussia. In 1764 he was appointed grand-marshal and general of the guard of the Prince of Hohenzollern-Hechingen, who made him a knight of the Order of Fidelity. Leaving an ample income, he came to America late in Baron Von Steuben. 1777 (arriving at Portsmouth, N. H., in November), and joined the army under Washington at Valley Forge. He was appointed inspector-general of the army with the rank of majorgeneral in March, 1778, and fought as a volunteer in the battle of Monmouth in June. Steuben introduced t
Steuben, Frederick William Augustus, Baron von 1730- Military officer; born in Magdeburg, Prussia, Nov. 15, 1730; educated at Neisse and Breslau. At the siege of Prague he was, at the age of fourteen years, a volunteer under his father, and was so distinguished at Prague and Rossbach in 1757 that he was made adjutant-general the next year. In 1761 he was sent prisoner to St. Petersburg, but was soon released, and in 1762 was placed on the staff of Frederick the Great of Prussia. In 1764 he was appointed grand-marshal and general of the guard of the Prince of Hohenzollern-Hechingen, who made him a knight of the Order of Fidelity. Leaving an ample income, he came to America late in Baron Von Steuben. 1777 (arriving at Portsmouth, N. H., in November), and joined the army under Washington at Valley Forge. He was appointed inspector-general of the army with the rank of majorgeneral in March, 1778, and fought as a volunteer in the battle of Monmouth in June. Steuben introduced t
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry steuben-frederick-william-augustus-baron-von
1777 (arriving at Portsmouth, N. H., in November), and joined the army under Washington at Valley Forge. He was appointed inspector-general of the army with the rank of majorgeneral in March, 1778, and fought as a volunteer in the battle of Monmouth in June. Steuben introduced thorough discipline in the army, and prepared a manual of tactics which was approved by Congress. He Steuben's log-house. commanded in Virginia in 1781, and was distinguished at Yorktown in October. The State of New Jersey gave him a small farm at the close of the war, and the State of New York gave him 16,000 acres of wild land in Oneida county. The national government gave him an annuity of $2,500. He withdrew from society, built a log-house on his domain in New York (afterwards Steubenville), and lived there until his death, Nov. 28, 1794. He gave a tenth of his estate to his aides—North, Popham, and Walker—and his servants, and parcelled the remainder among twenty or thirty tenants. He was gener
erica late in Baron Von Steuben. 1777 (arriving at Portsmouth, N. H., in November), and joined the army under Washington at Valley Forge. He was appointed inspector-general of the army with the rank of majorgeneral in March, 1778, and fought as a volunteer in the battle of Monmouth in June. Steuben introduced thorough discipline in the army, and prepared a manual of tactics which was approved by Congress. He Steuben's log-house. commanded in Virginia in 1781, and was distinguished at Yorktown in October. The State of New Jersey gave him a small farm at the close of the war, and the State of New York gave him 16,000 acres of wild land in Oneida county. The national government gave him an annuity of $2,500. He withdrew from society, built a log-house on his domain in New York (afterwards Steubenville), and lived there until his death, Nov. 28, 1794. He gave a tenth of his estate to his aides—North, Popham, and Walker—and his servants, and parcelled the remainder among twenty o
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): entry steuben-frederick-william-augustus-baron-von
der Washington at Valley Forge. He was appointed inspector-general of the army with the rank of majorgeneral in March, 1778, and fought as a volunteer in the battle of Monmouth in June. Steuben introduced thorough discipline in the army, and prepared a manual of tactics which was approved by Congress. He Steuben's log-house. commanded in Virginia in 1781, and was distinguished at Yorktown in October. The State of New Jersey gave him a small farm at the close of the war, and the State of New York gave him 16,000 acres of wild land in Oneida county. The national government gave him an annuity of $2,500. He withdrew from society, built a log-house on his domain in New York (afterwards Steubenville), and lived there until his death, Nov. 28, 1794. He gave a tenth of his estate to his aides—North, Popham, and Walker—and his servants, and parcelled the remainder among twenty or thirty tenants. He was generous, witty, cheerful, and of polished manners. Steuben was buried in his
Portsmouth (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): entry steuben-frederick-william-augustus-baron-von
was so distinguished at Prague and Rossbach in 1757 that he was made adjutant-general the next year. In 1761 he was sent prisoner to St. Petersburg, but was soon released, and in 1762 was placed on the staff of Frederick the Great of Prussia. In 1764 he was appointed grand-marshal and general of the guard of the Prince of Hohenzollern-Hechingen, who made him a knight of the Order of Fidelity. Leaving an ample income, he came to America late in Baron Von Steuben. 1777 (arriving at Portsmouth, N. H., in November), and joined the army under Washington at Valley Forge. He was appointed inspector-general of the army with the rank of majorgeneral in March, 1778, and fought as a volunteer in the battle of Monmouth in June. Steuben introduced thorough discipline in the army, and prepared a manual of tactics which was approved by Congress. He Steuben's log-house. commanded in Virginia in 1781, and was distinguished at Yorktown in October. The State of New Jersey gave him a small
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