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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 28 total hits in 16 results.

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Connecticut River (United States) (search for this): entry stevens-john
never practised. Seeing John Fitch's steamboat on the Collect in New York in 1787, he became interested in the subject of steamboat navigation, and experimented for nearly thirty years. He unsuccessfully petitioned the legislature of New York for the exclusive navigation of the waters of the State. He built a propeller in 1804—a small open boat worked by steam. It was so successful that he built the Phoenix, a steamboat completed soon after Fulton and Livingston had set the Clermont afloat. The latter having obtained the exclusive right to navigate the waters of New York, Stevens placed his boats on the Delaware and Connecticut rivers. In 1812 he published a pamphlet urging the United States government to make experiments in railways traversed by carriages propelled by steam, and proposed the construction of a railway for such a purpose from Albany to Lake Erie. This was nearly a quarter of a century before such a work was accomplished. He died in Hoboken, N. J., March 6, 183
South river (United States) (search for this): entry stevens-john
never practised. Seeing John Fitch's steamboat on the Collect in New York in 1787, he became interested in the subject of steamboat navigation, and experimented for nearly thirty years. He unsuccessfully petitioned the legislature of New York for the exclusive navigation of the waters of the State. He built a propeller in 1804—a small open boat worked by steam. It was so successful that he built the Phoenix, a steamboat completed soon after Fulton and Livingston had set the Clermont afloat. The latter having obtained the exclusive right to navigate the waters of New York, Stevens placed his boats on the Delaware and Connecticut rivers. In 1812 he published a pamphlet urging the United States government to make experiments in railways traversed by carriages propelled by steam, and proposed the construction of a railway for such a purpose from Albany to Lake Erie. This was nearly a quarter of a century before such a work was accomplished. He died in Hoboken, N. J., March 6, 183
King's college (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry stevens-john
Stevens, John 1749-1838 Inventor; born in New York City, in 1749; graduated at King's College (now Columbia University) in 1768; and studied law, but never practised. Seeing John Fitch's steamboat on the Collect in New York in 1787, he became interested in the subject of steamboat navigation, and experimented for nearly thirty years. He unsuccessfully petitioned the legislature of New York for the exclusive navigation of the waters of the State. He built a propeller in 1804—a small open boat worked by steam. It was so successful that he built the Phoenix, a steamboat completed soon after Fulton and Livingston had set the Clermont afloat. The latter having obtained the exclusive right to navigate the waters of New York, Stevens placed his boats on the Delaware and Connecticut rivers. In 1812 he published a pamphlet urging the United States government to make experiments in railways traversed by carriages propelled by steam, and proposed the construction of a railway for such a
Lake Erie (United States) (search for this): entry stevens-john
never practised. Seeing John Fitch's steamboat on the Collect in New York in 1787, he became interested in the subject of steamboat navigation, and experimented for nearly thirty years. He unsuccessfully petitioned the legislature of New York for the exclusive navigation of the waters of the State. He built a propeller in 1804—a small open boat worked by steam. It was so successful that he built the Phoenix, a steamboat completed soon after Fulton and Livingston had set the Clermont afloat. The latter having obtained the exclusive right to navigate the waters of New York, Stevens placed his boats on the Delaware and Connecticut rivers. In 1812 he published a pamphlet urging the United States government to make experiments in railways traversed by carriages propelled by steam, and proposed the construction of a railway for such a purpose from Albany to Lake Erie. This was nearly a quarter of a century before such a work was accomplished. He died in Hoboken, N. J., March 6, 183
Hoboken (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry stevens-john
never practised. Seeing John Fitch's steamboat on the Collect in New York in 1787, he became interested in the subject of steamboat navigation, and experimented for nearly thirty years. He unsuccessfully petitioned the legislature of New York for the exclusive navigation of the waters of the State. He built a propeller in 1804—a small open boat worked by steam. It was so successful that he built the Phoenix, a steamboat completed soon after Fulton and Livingston had set the Clermont afloat. The latter having obtained the exclusive right to navigate the waters of New York, Stevens placed his boats on the Delaware and Connecticut rivers. In 1812 he published a pamphlet urging the United States government to make experiments in railways traversed by carriages propelled by steam, and proposed the construction of a railway for such a purpose from Albany to Lake Erie. This was nearly a quarter of a century before such a work was accomplished. He died in Hoboken, N. J., March 6, 183
lumbia University) in 1768; and studied law, but never practised. Seeing John Fitch's steamboat on the Collect in New York in 1787, he became interested in the subject of steamboat navigation, and experimented for nearly thirty years. He unsuccessfully petitioned the legislature of New York for the exclusive navigation of the waters of the State. He built a propeller in 1804—a small open boat worked by steam. It was so successful that he built the Phoenix, a steamboat completed soon after Fulton and Livingston had set the Clermont afloat. The latter having obtained the exclusive right to navigate the waters of New York, Stevens placed his boats on the Delaware and Connecticut rivers. In 1812 he published a pamphlet urging the United States government to make experiments in railways traversed by carriages propelled by steam, and proposed the construction of a railway for such a purpose from Albany to Lake Erie. This was nearly a quarter of a century before such a work was accompli
Stevens, John 1749-1838 Inventor; born in New York City, in 1749; graduated at King's College (now Columbia University) in 1768; and studied law, but never practised. Seeing John Fitch's steamboat on the Collect in New York in 1787, he became interested in the subject of steamboat navigation, and experimented for nearly thirty years. He unsuccessfully petitioned the legislature of New York for the exclusive navigation of the waters of the State. He built a propeller in 1804—a small open boat worked by steam. It was so successful that he built the Phoenix, a steamboat completed soon after Fulton and Livingston had set the Clermont afloat. The latter having obtained the exclusive right to navigate the waters of New York, Stevens placed his boats on the Delaware and Connecticut rivers. In 1812 he published a pamphlet urging the United States government to make experiments in railways traversed by carriages propelled by steam, and proposed the construction of a railway for such a
Stevens, John 1749-1838 Inventor; born in New York City, in 1749; graduated at King's College (now Columbia University) in 1768; and studied law, but never practised. Seeing John Fitch's steamboat on the Collect in New York in 1787, he became interested in the subject of steamboat navigation, and experimented for nearly thirty years. He unsuccessfully petitioned the legislature of New York for the exclusive navigation of the waters of the State. He built a propeller in 1804—a small open boat worked by steam. It was so successful that he built the Phoenix, a steamboat completed soon after Fulton and Livingston had set the Clermont afloat. The latter having obtained the exclusive right to navigate the waters of New York, Stevens placed his boats on the Delaware and Connecticut rivers. In 1812 he published a pamphlet urging the United States government to make experiments in railways traversed by carriages propelled by steam, and proposed the construction of a railway for such
Robert R. Livingston (search for this): entry stevens-john
sity) in 1768; and studied law, but never practised. Seeing John Fitch's steamboat on the Collect in New York in 1787, he became interested in the subject of steamboat navigation, and experimented for nearly thirty years. He unsuccessfully petitioned the legislature of New York for the exclusive navigation of the waters of the State. He built a propeller in 1804—a small open boat worked by steam. It was so successful that he built the Phoenix, a steamboat completed soon after Fulton and Livingston had set the Clermont afloat. The latter having obtained the exclusive right to navigate the waters of New York, Stevens placed his boats on the Delaware and Connecticut rivers. In 1812 he published a pamphlet urging the United States government to make experiments in railways traversed by carriages propelled by steam, and proposed the construction of a railway for such a purpose from Albany to Lake Erie. This was nearly a quarter of a century before such a work was accomplished. He die
never practised. Seeing John Fitch's steamboat on the Collect in New York in 1787, he became interested in the subject of steamboat navigation, and experimented for nearly thirty years. He unsuccessfully petitioned the legislature of New York for the exclusive navigation of the waters of the State. He built a propeller in 1804—a small open boat worked by steam. It was so successful that he built the Phoenix, a steamboat completed soon after Fulton and Livingston had set the Clermont afloat. The latter having obtained the exclusive right to navigate the waters of New York, Stevens placed his boats on the Delaware and Connecticut rivers. In 1812 he published a pamphlet urging the United States government to make experiments in railways traversed by carriages propelled by steam, and proposed the construction of a railway for such a purpose from Albany to Lake Erie. This was nearly a quarter of a century before such a work was accomplished. He died in Hoboken, N. J., March 6, 183
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