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Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): entry stock-raising
animals in the United States. In 1783 some horned cattle were imported into Maryland, and passed into the hands of Matthew Patton. of Virginia, who took great pains in raising pure stock from them. He went with a considerable herd of them to Kentucky in 1794. That Patton stock made a sensible impression upon the public mind. Some short-horns were imported from England into Westchester county, N. Y., from 1792 to 1796; and these were purchased with the design of improving the breed of American cattle—the first effort of the kind. In 1815 Henry Clay introduced the Herefords from England into Kentucky. Afterwards other fine breeds came, until now we have as fine cattle as any country in the world. Associations have been formed in the West for importing choice stock, and, by importations and crossings, the production and value of cattle have greatly increased. The same may be said of American horses, sheep, and swine. In 1840 the aggregate number of bulls, cows, and oxen in the
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): entry stock-raising
Stock-raising. It was not until the close of the Revolutionary War that much attention was paid to the improvement of the breeds of domestic animals in the United States. In 1783 some horned cattle were imported into Maryland, and passed into the hands of Matthew Patton. of Virginia, who took great pains in raising pure stock from them. He went with a considerable herd of them to Kentucky in 1794. That Patton stock made a sensible impression upon the public mind. Some short-horns were imported from England into Westchester county, N. Y., from 1792 to 1796; and these were purchased with the design of improving the breed of American cattle—the first effort of the kind. In 1815 Henry Clay introduced the Herefords from England into Kentucky. Afterwards other fine breeds came, until now we have as fine cattle as any country in the world. Associations have been formed in the West for importing choice stock, and, by importations and crossings, the production and value of cattle
United States (United States) (search for this): entry stock-raising
ention was paid to the improvement of the breeds of domestic animals in the United States. In 1783 some horned cattle were imported into Maryland, and passed into tp, and swine. In 1840 the aggregate number of bulls, cows, and oxen in the United States was 15,000,000 head. In 1880 (in the space of forty years) they had incrwhich was more than $1,500,000,000. No country raises finer horses than the United States, nor is any country so bountifully supplied with them. We had about 12,000 a large and profitable industry. There were fully 36,000,000 sheep in the United States, and they have increased largely in recent years. The fleece that commandeeteenth century some efforts were made to improve the breed of swine in the United States. Soon after his return from Europe, Chancellor Livingston imported some anole number of swine in the Union was 47,681,700. In 1900 there were in the United States 13,537,524 horses, valued at $603,969,442; 2,086,027 mules, valued at $111,
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry stock-raising
orses than the United States, nor is any country so bountifully supplied with them. We had about 12,000,000 in 1880, of which about 9,000,000 were on farms. This gave one horse to every five persons of the population. We had, also, about 1,800,000 mules and asses. Sheep husbandry is a large and profitable industry. There were fully 36,000,000 sheep in the United States, and they have increased largely in recent years. The fleece that commanded the highest premium at the world's fair in London in 1851 was grown among the hills of Tennessee. Early in the nineteenth century some efforts were made to improve the breed of swine in the United States. Soon after his return from Europe, Chancellor Livingston imported some and bred from them. There was much opposition at first among the farmers to this innovation; but the palpable superiority of the imported to the native swine was so apparent that the prejudice was soon overcome, and there began to be an improvement in the appearance
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry stock-raising
ry so bountifully supplied with them. We had about 12,000,000 in 1880, of which about 9,000,000 were on farms. This gave one horse to every five persons of the population. We had, also, about 1,800,000 mules and asses. Sheep husbandry is a large and profitable industry. There were fully 36,000,000 sheep in the United States, and they have increased largely in recent years. The fleece that commanded the highest premium at the world's fair in London in 1851 was grown among the hills of Tennessee. Early in the nineteenth century some efforts were made to improve the breed of swine in the United States. Soon after his return from Europe, Chancellor Livingston imported some and bred from them. There was much opposition at first among the farmers to this innovation; but the palpable superiority of the imported to the native swine was so apparent that the prejudice was soon overcome, and there began to be an improvement in the appearance of swine in many parts of the country. In 18
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry stock-raising
Patton. of Virginia, who took great pains in raising pure stock from them. He went with a considerable herd of them to Kentucky in 1794. That Patton stock made a sensible impression upon the public mind. Some short-horns were imported from England into Westchester county, N. Y., from 1792 to 1796; and these were purchased with the design of improving the breed of American cattle—the first effort of the kind. In 1815 Henry Clay introduced the Herefords from England into Kentucky. AfterwaEngland into Kentucky. Afterwards other fine breeds came, until now we have as fine cattle as any country in the world. Associations have been formed in the West for importing choice stock, and, by importations and crossings, the production and value of cattle have greatly increased. The same may be said of American horses, sheep, and swine. In 1840 the aggregate number of bulls, cows, and oxen in the United States was 15,000,000 head. In 1880 (in the space of forty years) they had increased to about 35,000,000. In 1
e persons of the population. We had, also, about 1,800,000 mules and asses. Sheep husbandry is a large and profitable industry. There were fully 36,000,000 sheep in the United States, and they have increased largely in recent years. The fleece that commanded the highest premium at the world's fair in London in 1851 was grown among the hills of Tennessee. Early in the nineteenth century some efforts were made to improve the breed of swine in the United States. Soon after his return from Europe, Chancellor Livingston imported some and bred from them. There was much opposition at first among the farmers to this innovation; but the palpable superiority of the imported to the native swine was so apparent that the prejudice was soon overcome, and there began to be an improvement in the appearance of swine in many parts of the country. In 1880 the whole number of swine in the Union was 47,681,700. In 1900 there were in the United States 13,537,524 horses, valued at $603,969,442; 2,08
Westchester (New York, United States) (search for this): entry stock-raising
close of the Revolutionary War that much attention was paid to the improvement of the breeds of domestic animals in the United States. In 1783 some horned cattle were imported into Maryland, and passed into the hands of Matthew Patton. of Virginia, who took great pains in raising pure stock from them. He went with a considerable herd of them to Kentucky in 1794. That Patton stock made a sensible impression upon the public mind. Some short-horns were imported from England into Westchester county, N. Y., from 1792 to 1796; and these were purchased with the design of improving the breed of American cattle—the first effort of the kind. In 1815 Henry Clay introduced the Herefords from England into Kentucky. Afterwards other fine breeds came, until now we have as fine cattle as any country in the world. Associations have been formed in the West for importing choice stock, and, by importations and crossings, the production and value of cattle have greatly increased. The same may be
Robert R. Livingston (search for this): entry stock-raising
population. We had, also, about 1,800,000 mules and asses. Sheep husbandry is a large and profitable industry. There were fully 36,000,000 sheep in the United States, and they have increased largely in recent years. The fleece that commanded the highest premium at the world's fair in London in 1851 was grown among the hills of Tennessee. Early in the nineteenth century some efforts were made to improve the breed of swine in the United States. Soon after his return from Europe, Chancellor Livingston imported some and bred from them. There was much opposition at first among the farmers to this innovation; but the palpable superiority of the imported to the native swine was so apparent that the prejudice was soon overcome, and there began to be an improvement in the appearance of swine in many parts of the country. In 1880 the whole number of swine in the Union was 47,681,700. In 1900 there were in the United States 13,537,524 horses, valued at $603,969,442; 2,086,027 mules, va
It was not until the close of the Revolutionary War that much attention was paid to the improvement of the breeds of domestic animals in the United States. In 1783 some horned cattle were imported into Maryland, and passed into the hands of Matthew Patton. of Virginia, who took great pains in raising pure stock from them. He went with a considerable herd of them to Kentucky in 1794. That Patton stock made a sensible impression upon the public mind. Some short-horns were imported from EnglPatton stock made a sensible impression upon the public mind. Some short-horns were imported from England into Westchester county, N. Y., from 1792 to 1796; and these were purchased with the design of improving the breed of American cattle—the first effort of the kind. In 1815 Henry Clay introduced the Herefords from England into Kentucky. Afterwards other fine breeds came, until now we have as fine cattle as any country in the world. Associations have been formed in the West for importing choice stock, and, by importations and crossings, the production and value of cattle have greatly increa
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