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West Point (New York, United States) (search for this): entry stoneman-george
Stoneman, George 1822-1894 Military officer; born in Busti, Chautauqua co., N. Y., Aug. 8, 1822; graduated at West Point in 1846; was captain, in command of Fort Brown, Tex., in 1861; and refused to obey the order of Gen. Twiggs (q. v.) to surrender the government property to the Confederates. He chartered a steamer, evacuated the post, and proceeded to New York, where he arrived March 15. He was made major of the 1st United States Cavalry, and served in western Virginia as inspector-general until made a brigadiergeneral of volunteers and chief of cavalry, in August. He was active in the Peninsular campaign in 1862; and after the fall of General Kearny, at Chantilly, he took command of that general's division. Gen. George Stoneman. He succeeded General Heintzelman as commander of the 3d Army Corps, which he led in the battle of Fredericksburg, and was promoted to major-general in November, 1862. In the Richmond campaign, in May, 1863, he commanded a cavalry corps on raids
Fort Taylor (Texas, United States) (search for this): entry stoneman-george
Stoneman, George 1822-1894 Military officer; born in Busti, Chautauqua co., N. Y., Aug. 8, 1822; graduated at West Point in 1846; was captain, in command of Fort Brown, Tex., in 1861; and refused to obey the order of Gen. Twiggs (q. v.) to surrender the government property to the Confederates. He chartered a steamer, evacuated the post, and proceeded to New York, where he arrived March 15. He was made major of the 1st United States Cavalry, and served in western Virginia as inspector-general until made a brigadiergeneral of volunteers and chief of cavalry, in August. He was active in the Peninsular campaign in 1862; and after the fall of General Kearny, at Chantilly, he took command of that general's division. Gen. George Stoneman. He succeeded General Heintzelman as commander of the 3d Army Corps, which he led in the battle of Fredericksburg, and was promoted to major-general in November, 1862. In the Richmond campaign, in May, 1863, he commanded a cavalry corps on raids
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry stoneman-george
he 23d Corps. Then he was transferred to the command of the cavalry in the Department of the Ohio. In July, 1864, General Sherman ordered General Stoneman, at Atlanta, to take his own and Garrard's cavalry, about 5,000 in all, and move by the left, around Atlanta, to Macdonough, while McCook was to move by the right to FayettevAtlanta, to Macdonough, while McCook was to move by the right to Fayetteville, and, sweeping round, join the latter at Lovejoy's Station, on the Macon Railway. He moved on the night of July 28. Stoneman, ambitious, tried to do too much, and failed in nearly all his undertakings on that raid. He obtained consent to go farther than Lovejoy's, after reaching that station, and attempt the capture of Macoavalry, under General Iverson, and was compelled to turn hastily back, closely pressed by the Confederates. His command was divided. One of his brigades reached Atlanta without much loss; another was dispersed, and the remainder, 1,000 strong, led by Stoneman himself, were surrounded by Iverson, and 700 of them made prisoners. T
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry stoneman-george
way. He moved on the night of July 28. Stoneman, ambitious, tried to do too much, and failed in nearly all his undertakings on that raid. He obtained consent to go farther than Lovejoy's, after reaching that station, and attempt the capture of Macon, and, pushing on, release the captives at Andersonville. He omitted to cooperate with McCook in his movement upon the railway at Lovejoy's, and with his own command, separated from Garrard's, about 3,000 in number, pressed on to Macon. There heMacon. There he was met by Confederate cavalry, under General Iverson, and was compelled to turn hastily back, closely pressed by the Confederates. His command was divided. One of his brigades reached Atlanta without much loss; another was dispersed, and the remainder, 1,000 strong, led by Stoneman himself, were surrounded by Iverson, and 700 of them made prisoners. The remainder escaped. Iverson had only about 500 men. Late in 1864 General Stoneman took command in east Tennessee, and concentrated the
Kingsport (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry stoneman-george
igades reached Atlanta without much loss; another was dispersed, and the remainder, 1,000 strong, led by Stoneman himself, were surrounded by Iverson, and 700 of them made prisoners. The remainder escaped. Iverson had only about 500 men. Late in 1864 General Stoneman took command in east Tennessee, and concentrated the forces of Gillem and Burbridge at Bean's Station. He moved towards Bristol (Dec. 12), where his advance struck a force under Basil Duke, one of Morgan's officers, near Kingsport, dispersed them, and captured their trains and eightyfour of their men. He menaced the salt-works at Saltville, in southwestern Virginia. General Gillem was very active in that region, and Stoneman proceeded to destroy the salt-works. Breckinridge, who was defending them, was driven over the mountains, and they were laid waste. Late in the winter Stoneman, who had returned to Knoxville, was ordered to make a cavalry raid into South Carolina, in aid of Sherman's movements. Before he was
Salisbury, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry stoneman-george
ruck the North Carolina Railway between Danville and Greensboro. He sent Colonel Palmer to destroy the railway between Salisbury and Greensboro and the factories at Salem, N. C., while the main body moved on Salisbury, forcing the Yadkin at HuntsviSalisbury, forcing the Yadkin at Huntsville (April 11, and skirmishing near there. Palmer captured a South Carolina regiment of 400 men. Ten miles east of Salisbury (which was a depot for Union prisoners) the raiders encountered 3,000 Confederates, under Pemberton, Grant's opponent at VSalisbury (which was a depot for Union prisoners) the raiders encountered 3,000 Confederates, under Pemberton, Grant's opponent at Vicksburg. He had eighteen guns. This force was charged by the brigades of Gillem and Brown; its guns were captured, also 3,000 small-arms, and a large collection of ammunition, provisions, and clothing, and over 1,200 men were made prisoners. The Confederates, who fled, were chased several miles. At Salisbury the raiders destroyed 10,000 small-arms, four cottonfactories, 7,000 bales of cotton, a vast amount of ammunition, provisions, and clothing, and the railway tracks in each direction.
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry stoneman-george
ced so far that the raid into South Carolina was unnecessary, and Stoneman proceeded to strike and destroy the Virginia and Tennessee Railway, in southwestern Virginia. It was torn up to within 4 miles of Lynchburg by a part of his command. At the same time Stoneman, with his main body, advanced on Christiansburg, and, sending troops east and west, destroyed about 90 miles of the railroad. Then he turned his force southward (April 9, 1865), and struck the North Carolina Railway between Danville and Greensboro. He sent Colonel Palmer to destroy the railway between Salisbury and Greensboro and the factories at Salem, N. C., while the main body moved on Salisbury, forcing the Yadkin at Huntsville (April 11, and skirmishing near there. Palmer captured a South Carolina regiment of 400 men. Ten miles east of Salisbury (which was a depot for Union prisoners) the raiders encountered 3,000 Confederates, under Pemberton, Grant's opponent at Vicksburg. He had eighteen guns. This force w
Buffalo, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry stoneman-george
7,000 bales of cotton, a vast amount of ammunition, provisions, and clothing, and the railway tracks in each direction. The Union prisoners had been removed. On April 17 Stoneman started for east Tennessee. On the 19th Maj. E. E. C. Moderwell, with 250 cavalry, burned the fine bridge of the Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad, 1,150 feet in length and 50 feet above the water, over the Catawba. It was a blackened ruin in the space of thirty minutes. After a sharp skirmish with Confederate cavalry, the raiders returned to their main body at Dallas, with 325 prisoners, 200 horses, and two pieces of artillery. During the course of the raid the National cavalry captured 6,000 prisoners, twenty-five pieces of artillery taken in action, twenty-one abandoned, and a large number of small-arms. In March, 1865, General Stoneman was brevetted major-general, United States army, and in 1871 was retired. He was governor of California in 1883-87. He died in Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 5, 1894.
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): entry stoneman-george
her was dispersed, and the remainder, 1,000 strong, led by Stoneman himself, were surrounded by Iverson, and 700 of them made prisoners. The remainder escaped. Iverson had only about 500 men. Late in 1864 General Stoneman took command in east Tennessee, and concentrated the forces of Gillem and Burbridge at Bean's Station. He moved towards Bristol (Dec. 12), where his advance struck a force under Basil Duke, one of Morgan's officers, near Kingsport, dispersed them, and captured their trainestroyed 10,000 small-arms, four cottonfactories, 7,000 bales of cotton, a vast amount of ammunition, provisions, and clothing, and the railway tracks in each direction. The Union prisoners had been removed. On April 17 Stoneman started for east Tennessee. On the 19th Maj. E. E. C. Moderwell, with 250 cavalry, burned the fine bridge of the Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad, 1,150 feet in length and 50 feet above the water, over the Catawba. It was a blackened ruin in the space of thirty
Bristol, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry stoneman-george
ed to turn hastily back, closely pressed by the Confederates. His command was divided. One of his brigades reached Atlanta without much loss; another was dispersed, and the remainder, 1,000 strong, led by Stoneman himself, were surrounded by Iverson, and 700 of them made prisoners. The remainder escaped. Iverson had only about 500 men. Late in 1864 General Stoneman took command in east Tennessee, and concentrated the forces of Gillem and Burbridge at Bean's Station. He moved towards Bristol (Dec. 12), where his advance struck a force under Basil Duke, one of Morgan's officers, near Kingsport, dispersed them, and captured their trains and eightyfour of their men. He menaced the salt-works at Saltville, in southwestern Virginia. General Gillem was very active in that region, and Stoneman proceeded to destroy the salt-works. Breckinridge, who was defending them, was driven over the mountains, and they were laid waste. Late in the winter Stoneman, who had returned to Knoxville,
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