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York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry toronto
e capital of Upper Canada in 1794, and named it York. There the seat of the provincial government make an invasion successful, would be to attack York first. This proposition was sanctioned by the al force. It was to cross the lake and capture York, and then proceed to attack Fort George. At thorning of the 27th the armament appeared before York. Chauncey's fleet consisted of the new sloop-os. The loss of the Americans in the capture of York, in killed and wounded on land, was 269; and ontory when the British ensign was pulled down at York. He lingered several hours. Just before he exthat position he died. The port and village of York were abandoned by the Americans, for they were order. When the Americans took possession of York, the Parliament-house and other public buildingion of the truth. Chauncey was not on shore at York. A few days after the capture of that city he ieutenant Dudley, the British standard taken at York on the 27th of April last, accompanied by the m[1 more...]
Fort George (Canada) (search for this): entry toronto
merican troops on the northern frontier sufficiently strong to attack Montreal, and he proposed instead to attack successively Kingston, York (now Toronto), and Fort George, near the mouth of the Niagara River, thus cutting off the communication between Montreal and Upper Canada. As the British had a sloop-of-war on the stocks at uncey and Dearborn had matured a plan of operations with a combined land and naval force. It was to cross the lake and capture York, and then proceed to attack Fort George. At the same time troops were to cross the Niagara River and capture Fort Erie, opposite Buffalo, and Fort Chippewa, below, join the victors at Fort George, anFort George, and all proceed to capture Kingston. With 1,700 troops under the immediate command of Brig.-Gen. Zebulon M. Pike, Dearborn sailed in Chauncey's fleet from Sackett's Harbor, April 25, and on the morning of the 27th the armament appeared before York. Chauncey's fleet consisted of the new sloop-of-war Madison, twenty-four guns, the br
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): entry toronto
Toronto, The name of an Indian village when Governor Simcoe made it the capital of Upper Canada in 1794, and named it York. There the seat of the provincial government remained until 1841, when Upper and Lower Canada (now Ontario and Quebec) formed a legislative union. When the confederation was formed, in 1867, Toronto, the name by which York had been known since 1834, became the permanent seat of government for Ontario. In the winter of 1812-13 the American Secretary of War (John Armstrong) conceived a new plan for an invasion of Canada. He did not think the American troops on the northern frontier sufficiently strong to attack Montreal, and he proposed instead to attack successively Kingston, York (now Toronto), and Fort George, near the mouth of the Niagara River, thus cutting off the communication between Montreal and Upper Canada. As the British had a sloop-of-war on the stocks at York, another fitting out there, and a third repairing, Dearborn and Chauncey were of o
Fort Erie (Canada) (search for this): entry toronto
arborn and Chauncey were of opinion that the surest way to secure the supremacy of Lake Ontario, and so make an invasion successful, would be to attack York first. This proposition was sanctioned by the President, and at the middle of April (1813) Chauncey and Dearborn had matured a plan of operations with a combined land and naval force. It was to cross the lake and capture York, and then proceed to attack Fort George. At the same time troops were to cross the Niagara River and capture Fort Erie, opposite Buffalo, and Fort Chippewa, below, join the victors at Fort George, and all proceed to capture Kingston. With 1,700 troops under the immediate command of Brig.-Gen. Zebulon M. Pike, Dearborn sailed in Chauncey's fleet from Sackett's Harbor, April 25, and on the morning of the 27th the armament appeared before York. Chauncey's fleet consisted of the new sloop-of-war Madison, twenty-four guns, the brig Oneida, and eleven armed schooners. York was then the headquarters of Gene
Buffalo, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry toronto
were of opinion that the surest way to secure the supremacy of Lake Ontario, and so make an invasion successful, would be to attack York first. This proposition was sanctioned by the President, and at the middle of April (1813) Chauncey and Dearborn had matured a plan of operations with a combined land and naval force. It was to cross the lake and capture York, and then proceed to attack Fort George. At the same time troops were to cross the Niagara River and capture Fort Erie, opposite Buffalo, and Fort Chippewa, below, join the victors at Fort George, and all proceed to capture Kingston. With 1,700 troops under the immediate command of Brig.-Gen. Zebulon M. Pike, Dearborn sailed in Chauncey's fleet from Sackett's Harbor, April 25, and on the morning of the 27th the armament appeared before York. Chauncey's fleet consisted of the new sloop-of-war Madison, twenty-four guns, the brig Oneida, and eleven armed schooners. York was then the headquarters of General Sheaffe, at the
Sackett's Harbor (New York, United States) (search for this): entry toronto
rt Erie, opposite Buffalo, and Fort Chippewa, below, join the victors at Fort George, and all proceed to capture Kingston. With 1,700 troops under the immediate command of Brig.-Gen. Zebulon M. Pike, Dearborn sailed in Chauncey's fleet from Sackett's Harbor, April 25, and on the morning of the 27th the armament appeared before York. Chauncey's fleet consisted of the new sloop-of-war Madison, twenty-four guns, the brig Oneida, and eleven armed schooners. York was then the headquarters of Ge British Indian shot, while in a tree, by that officer when the Americans advanced, the fair fame of a dead man demands the revelation of the truth. Chauncey was not on shore at York. A few days after the capture of that city he wrote from Sackett's Harbor to the Secretary of the Navy: I have the honor to present to you, by the hands of Lieutenant Dudley, the British standard taken at York on the 27th of April last, accompanied by the mace, over which hung a human scalp. These articles were t
Canada (Canada) (search for this): entry toronto
Toronto, The name of an Indian village when Governor Simcoe made it the capital of Upper Canada in 1794, and named it York. There the seat of the provincial government remained until 1841, when Upper and Lower Canada (now Ontario and Quebec) fLower Canada (now Ontario and Quebec) formed a legislative union. When the confederation was formed, in 1867, Toronto, the name by which York had been known since 1834, became the permanent seat of government for Ontario. In the winter of 1812-13 the American Secretary of War (John Armstrong) conceived a new plan for an invasion of Canada. He did not think the American troops on the northern frontier sufficiently strong to attack Montreal, and he proposed instead to attack successively Kingston, York (now Toronto), and Fort George, near the mouth of the Niagara River, thus cutting off the communication between Montreal and Upper Canada. As the British had a sloop-of-war on the stocks at York, another fitting out there, and a third repairing, Dearborn and Chauncey were of o
Forsyth, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): entry toronto
which the troops had left the fleet farther westward, and beyond any effectual covering by the guns of the navy. Major Forsyth and his riflemen led the van in landing. When within half rifle-shot of the shore they were assailed by a deadly volley of bullets from a company of Glengary men and a party of Indians concealed in the woods. Pike, from the deck of the Madison, saw this, and, jumping into a boat, ordered his staff to follow. Very soon he was in the midst of a sharp fight between Forsyth's men and the party on shore. The main body soon followed, and the British were driven back to their works near the town. The Americans, led by Pike, followed closely and captured two redoubts, and at the same time Chauncey hurled deadly volleys of grape-shot on the foe from his guns. Heavy ordnance had been landed, and these were pressed forward with great fatigue over the many ravines. The Indian allies of the British, frightened by the cannon, deserted Sheaffe, and the latter fell ba
Lake Ontario (search for this): entry toronto
did not think the American troops on the northern frontier sufficiently strong to attack Montreal, and he proposed instead to attack successively Kingston, York (now Toronto), and Fort George, near the mouth of the Niagara River, thus cutting off the communication between Montreal and Upper Canada. As the British had a sloop-of-war on the stocks at York, another fitting out there, and a third repairing, Dearborn and Chauncey were of opinion that the surest way to secure the supremacy of Lake Ontario, and so make an invasion successful, would be to attack York first. This proposition was sanctioned by the President, and at the middle of April (1813) Chauncey and Dearborn had matured a plan of operations with a combined land and naval force. It was to cross the lake and capture York, and then proceed to attack Fort George. At the same time troops were to cross the Niagara River and capture Fort Erie, opposite Buffalo, and Fort Chippewa, below, join the victors at Fort George, and al
Niagara River (New York, United States) (search for this): entry toronto
an invasion of Canada. He did not think the American troops on the northern frontier sufficiently strong to attack Montreal, and he proposed instead to attack successively Kingston, York (now Toronto), and Fort George, near the mouth of the Niagara River, thus cutting off the communication between Montreal and Upper Canada. As the British had a sloop-of-war on the stocks at York, another fitting out there, and a third repairing, Dearborn and Chauncey were of opinion that the surest way to semiddle of April (1813) Chauncey and Dearborn had matured a plan of operations with a combined land and naval force. It was to cross the lake and capture York, and then proceed to attack Fort George. At the same time troops were to cross the Niagara River and capture Fort Erie, opposite Buffalo, and Fort Chippewa, below, join the victors at Fort George, and all proceed to capture Kingston. With 1,700 troops under the immediate command of Brig.-Gen. Zebulon M. Pike, Dearborn sailed in Chauncey
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