hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 957 total hits in 327 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
to read his commission to them and assume command. Captain Wadsworth prevents this by ordering the drums to beat, threatening death to the governor if he persists.] Charter ratified by William III.......April, 1694 Boundary of 1683 between New York and Connecticut confirmed by William III.......1700 Charter for a college at New Haven (Yale) granted by the General Court......Oct. 9, 1701 First issue of bills of credit by Connecticut, £ 8,000 for an anticipated expedition against Canada......1709 First printer in the colony, Thomas Short, from Boston, at New London......1709 He publishes the Saybrook platform of Church discipline......1710 Settlement of the boundary with Massachusetts......1713 [Massachusetts grants to Connecticut 107,793 acres, the amount that Massachusetts had encroached upon Connecticut. The tract was sold by Connecticut in 1716 for about $2,274; given to Yale College. Boundary run as it now is, 1826, leaving indentation to Massachusetts ab
Wethersfield (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry united-states-of-america-connecticut
Court at Newtown (Hartford) applies to Massachusetts for aid against the Pequods......Feb. 21, 1637 [The name Newtown is changed to Hartford, Watertown to Wethersfield, and Dorchester to Windsor by this court. Hartford was so named in horor of the Rev. Mr. Stone, who was born at Hartford, England.] Wethersfield attacked bWethersfield attacked by the Pequods, several killed......April, 1637 The court at Hartford, bent on offensive war against the Pequods, call for eightyeight men—forty-two from Hartford, thirty from Windsor, sixteen from Wethersfield......May 1, 1637 These are joined by Uncas, sachem of the Mohegans, with seventy warriors, at Say-Brook fort......MaWethersfield......May 1, 1637 These are joined by Uncas, sachem of the Mohegans, with seventy warriors, at Say-Brook fort......May 15, 1637 Capt. John Mason, of Windsor, commanding the expedition, sails from Fort Say-Brook for Narraganset Bay, to surprise the Pequod fort......May 19, 1637 At Narraganset Bay about 200 Narraganset warriors join him. He approaches the Pequod fort on the evening of May 25, and next morning, at early light, he attacks and
Wooden clocks first made at Waterbury......1790 Gen. Israel Putnam dies at Brookline, Conn.......May 19, 1790 Connecticut bestows upon citizens, especially those of Danbury, Fairfield, Groton, New London, and Norwalk, who had suffered during the Revolution, half a million acres at the west end of the Western Reserve in Ohio, hence known as Fire lands ......1792 Connecticut sells to the Connecticut Land Company, of 320 citizens, 3,200,000 acres, the remainder of the tract between Lake Erie and lat. 41° N..1795 [The price, $1,200,000, was made a State school fund.] Connecticut through Governor Trumbull, executes surrender to the United States of jurisdiction over the Western Reserve, Ohio......May 30, 1800 Connecticut opposed to war of......1812 New London blockaded by Sir Thomas Hardy with British ships for twenty months......June, 1813 Stonington bombarded by Sir Thomas Hardy's fleet......Aug. 9-12, 1814 Delegates from the several New England legislatures
Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry united-states-of-america-connecticut
f the Connecticut, and call the fort Say-Brook, in honor of Lords Say and Brook......Nov. 9, 1635 A Dutch vessel appears off the mouth, but is not suffered to land......November, 1635 Great suffering at Windsor, on the Connecticut, during the winter of......1635-36 First court in Connecticut held at Newtown (Hartford)......April 26, 1636 Rev. Thomas Hooker, the light of the Western churches, and Rev. Mr. Stone, with 100 men, women, and children, and 160 head of cattle, leave Cambridge, Mass., for the Connecticut River through the wilderness......June, 1636 They reach the river early in......July, 1636 John Oldham murdered by the Indians near Block Island......July, 1636 War with the Pequods......July, 1636 [The Pequods, with at least 700 warriors, then occupied eastern Connecticut, and ruled part of Long Island.] An expedition against the Pequods and Indians on Block Island is sent from Massachusetts under John Endicott......Aug. 25–Sept. 14, 1630 [It exas
Norwalk (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry united-states-of-america-connecticut
rlands, visits Hartford to settle certain boundary questions with the New England United Colonies......Sept. 11, 1650 Norwalk settled......1651 Middletown settled......1651 French agents from Quebec visit the Connecticut colonists, asking General Tryon lands at New Haven with about 3,000 men and plunders it......July 5, 1778 Fairfield, Green's Farm, and Norwalk burned......1778 General Tryon, from Kingsbridge, N. Y., with 1,500 troops, destroys the salt-works at Horseneck, Con......May 19, 1790 Connecticut bestows upon citizens, especially those of Danbury, Fairfield, Groton, New London, and Norwalk, who had suffered during the Revolution, half a million acres at the west end of the Western Reserve in Ohio, hence know day of meeting of General Assembly......Oct. 2, 1875 Orris S. Ferry, United States Senator from Connecticut, dies at Norwalk......Nov. 21, 1875 Greenback men meet in convention at New Haven......Feb. 22, 1876 William H. Barnum, Democrat, e
Connecticut frees her slaves......1784 Connecticut makes a qualified cession to the United States of all territory south of lat. 41° N. and west of a line 120 miles west of Pennsylvania......Sept. 14, 1786 [The space left to Connecticut in Ohio is known as the Western Reserve, and is claimed as a compensation for the territory relinquished in Pennsylvania.] Constitution of the United States ratified by Connecticut; vote 128 to 40......Jan. 9, 1788 Wooden clocks first made at Waterbrookline, Conn.......May 19, 1790 Connecticut bestows upon citizens, especially those of Danbury, Fairfield, Groton, New London, and Norwalk, who had suffered during the Revolution, half a million acres at the west end of the Western Reserve in Ohio, hence known as Fire lands ......1792 Connecticut sells to the Connecticut Land Company, of 320 citizens, 3,200,000 acres, the remainder of the tract between Lake Erie and lat. 41° N..1795 [The price, $1,200,000, was made a State school fund
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry united-states-of-america-connecticut
, but did not subdue, the Indians.] Roger Williams, of Rhode Island, prevents a league between the Pequods and Narragansets......1636 Fort at Saybrook, at the mouth of the Connecticut, beleaguered by the Pequods all the winter of......1636-37 About thirty colonists of Connecticut killed by the Pequods during the winter of......1636-37 Court at Newtown (Hartford) applies to Massachusetts for aid against the Pequods......Feb. 21, 1637 [The name Newtown is changed to Hartford, Watertown to Wethersfield, and Dorchester to Windsor by this court. Hartford was so named in horor of the Rev. Mr. Stone, who was born at Hartford, England.] Wethersfield attacked by the Pequods, several killed......April, 1637 The court at Hartford, bent on offensive war against the Pequods, call for eightyeight men—forty-two from Hartford, thirty from Windsor, sixteen from Wethersfield......May 1, 1637 These are joined by Uncas, sachem of the Mohegans, with seventy warriors, at Say-Brook
Waterbury (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry united-states-of-america-connecticut
Connecticut frees her slaves......1784 Connecticut makes a qualified cession to the United States of all territory south of lat. 41° N. and west of a line 120 miles west of Pennsylvania......Sept. 14, 1786 [The space left to Connecticut in Ohio is known as the Western Reserve, and is claimed as a compensation for the territory relinquished in Pennsylvania.] Constitution of the United States ratified by Connecticut; vote 128 to 40......Jan. 9, 1788 Wooden clocks first made at Waterbury......1790 Gen. Israel Putnam dies at Brookline, Conn.......May 19, 1790 Connecticut bestows upon citizens, especially those of Danbury, Fairfield, Groton, New London, and Norwalk, who had suffered during the Revolution, half a million acres at the west end of the Western Reserve in Ohio, hence known as Fire lands ......1792 Connecticut sells to the Connecticut Land Company, of 320 citizens, 3,200,000 acres, the remainder of the tract between Lake Erie and lat. 41° N..1795 [The
Stratford, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry united-states-of-america-connecticut
ring, 14; declare Jewell elected......May 10, 1871 Governor Jewell assumes office......May 16, 1871 Noah Porter elected president of Yale University in place of Theodore D. Woolsey, resigned......1871 Temperance party, represented by about 100 delegates, meets at New Haven and nominates a full State ticket......Dec. 13, 1871 Labor-reform party holds a State convention at Bridgeport and nominates a State ticket......Jan. 3, 1872 Jesse Olney, geographer, born in 1798, dies at Stratford......July 30, 1872 State constitution amended; all sessions of the General Assembly, from May, 1875, to be held at Hartford......Oct. 7, 1873 Ex-Gov. and United States Senator W. A. Buckingham dies at Norwich......Feb. 4, 1875 State constitution amended: Tuesday after first Monday in November made general election day; Wednesday after first Monday in January the day of meeting of General Assembly......Oct. 2, 1875 Orris S. Ferry, United States Senator from Connecticut, dies at
Brooklyn, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry united-states-of-america-connecticut
; ratified by 30,520 to 16,380......Oct. 6, 1884 President Noah Porter, of Yale University, resigns......1886 Republican candidates for State officers elected by the legislature, there being no choice in State election of Nov. 2, 1886......January, 1887 First text-book ever published by the State, a small treatise on the effect of alcohol on the human system, is issued and distributed to the schools......September, 1887 Equestrian statue of Gen. Israel Putnam erected at Brooklyn, Windham county, and unveiled......Jan. 14, 1888 First Monday in September designated a public holiday (Labor Day), a State normal school established at Willimantic, and an anti-screen saloon law and modified Australian ballot law passed by legislature in session......Jan. 9–June 22, 1889 Alfred H. Terry, major-general, United States army, born 1827, dies at New Haven......Dec. 16, 1890 Deadlock between the two houses of the legislature on the governorship......Jan. 7, 1891 Democratic c
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...