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es to Hartford and demands the charter in the name of King James II......Oct. 31, 1687 [After a long discussion in the assembly, early in the evening the lights are extinguished, and the charter is taken from the table and secreted by Capt. Willliam Wadsworth, of Hartford, in a hollow oak-tree, known since as the charter oak, on the estate of the Wyllyses, across the river.] Sir Edmund Andros assumes the governments, selects councillors, seizes the records of the colony, and rules arbitrarle the Assembly is in session and demands command of the militia under commission from the King......Oct. 26, 1693 [The Assembly refusing, he orders the militia under arms, and attempts to read his commission to them and assume command. Captain Wadsworth prevents this by ordering the drums to beat, threatening death to the governor if he persists.] Charter ratified by William III.......April, 1694 Boundary of 1683 between New York and Connecticut confirmed by William III.......1700
r W. A. Buckingham dies at Norwich......Feb. 4, 1875 State constitution amended: Tuesday after first Monday in November made general election day; Wednesday after first Monday in January the day of meeting of General Assembly......Oct. 2, 1875 Orris S. Ferry, United States Senator from Connecticut, dies at Norwalk......Nov. 21, 1875 Greenback men meet in convention at New Haven......Feb. 22, 1876 William H. Barnum, Democrat, elected to fill the unexpired term of United States Senator Ferry, deceased......May 17, 1876 Agricultural experiment station established by law......1877 Gideon Welles, ex-Secretary of Navy, dies at Hartford......Feb. 11, 1878 Act passed for State Board of Health of six members......March 13, 1878 Legislature occupies the new capitol for the first time......March 26, 1878 There being no choice for State officers, November, 1878, the legislature elects Charles B. Andrews governor......Jan. 9, 1879 Boundary dispute between New York and
harter, by a vote of 13,918 to 12,361......Oct. 5, 1818 Washington College (Episcopal) chartered at Hartford......1823 [Name changed to Trinity, 1845.] Wesleyan University at Middletown (Methodist) chartered......1831 Prudence Crandall opens a school for colored children at Canterbury......1833 [She is arrested and sent to jail. On failure to convict her the school-house is sacked by a mob and the inmates expelled.] Ship Amistad, Spanish, brought into New London by Lieutenant Geding, of the United States brig Washington......Aug. 29, 1839 John W. Niles appointed postmastergeneral in Van Buren's cabinet......May 25, 1840 Amendment to article VIII. of the State constitution abolishing freehold qualification for electors, etc., ratified......October, 1845 State Teachers' Association organized......April 7, 1846 Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University opened......1847 Act passed for registering births, marriages, and deaths......1848 Isaac To
ildren, and 160 head of cattle, leave Cambridge, Mass., for the Connecticut River through the wilderness......June, 1636 They reach the river early in......July, 1636 John Oldham murdered by the Indians near Block Island......July, 1636 War with the Pequods......July, 1636 [The Pequods, with at least 700 warriors, then occupied eastern Connecticut, and ruled part of Long Island.] An expedition against the Pequods and Indians on Block Island is sent from Massachusetts under John Endicott......Aug. 25–Sept. 14, 1630 [It exasperated, but did not subdue, the Indians.] Roger Williams, of Rhode Island, prevents a league between the Pequods and Narragansets......1636 Fort at Saybrook, at the mouth of the Connecticut, beleaguered by the Pequods all the winter of......1636-37 About thirty colonists of Connecticut killed by the Pequods during the winter of......1636-37 Court at Newtown (Hartford) applies to Massachusetts for aid against the Pequods......Feb. 21, 1
1 First regiment enlisted for three years, the 4th Connecticut Infantry, leaves Hartford under Col. Levi Woodhouse......June 10, 1861 Brig.-Gen. Nathaniel Lyon, born in Ashford, July 14, 1819; killed in battle of Wilson's Creek, Mo.......Aug. 10, 1861 Gen. Joseph K. F. Mansfield, born in New Haven, Dec. 22, 1803; killed in battle of Antietam......Sept. 17, 1862 Rear-Admiral Andrew Hull Foote, born in New Haven, Sept. 12, 1806; dies at New York City......June 26, 1863 Maj.-Gen. John Sedgwick, born in Cornwall, Sept. 13, 1813; killed in battle of Spottsylvania......May 9, 1864 Fifty thousand six hundred and twenty-three three-years' troops furnished during the war......1861-65 State board of fish commissioners created......1865 State board of education organized, with Daniel C. Gilman as secretary......1865 Lydia Sigourney, poet, dies at Hartford......June 10, 1865 Legislature which convened at Hartford, May 3, adjourns after the longest session on record
er to Windsor by this court. Hartford was so named in horor of the Rev. Mr. Stone, who was born at Hartford, England.] Wethersfield attacked by the Pequods, several killed......April, 1637 The court at Hartford, bent on offensive war against the Pequods, call for eightyeight men—forty-two from Hartford, thirty from Windsor, sixteen from Wethersfield......May 1, 1637 These are joined by Uncas, sachem of the Mohegans, with seventy warriors, at Say-Brook fort......May 15, 1637 Capt. John Mason, of Windsor, commanding the expedition, sails from Fort Say-Brook for Narraganset Bay, to surprise the Pequod fort......May 19, 1637 At Narraganset Bay about 200 Narraganset warriors join him. He approaches the Pequod fort on the evening of May 25, and next morning, at early light, he attacks and completely destroys it, together with about 600 Indians, men, women, and children, losing two killed and about twenty wounded......May 26, 1637 Court of Connecticut calls for forty more m
[The council of Plymouth the previous year had granted the whole tract to the Earl of Warwick, and the grant had been confirmed to him by a patent from King Charles I.] Wahquimacut, a sachem from the Connecticut River, visits Plymouth and Boston, asking colonial governors to send settlers to that river......1631 [Governor Winthrop, of Massachusetts, does not favor the movement.] John Oldham, from Dorchester, Mass., and three others visit the Connecticut......September, 1633 William Holmes, of Plymouth, prepares the frame of a house with a board covering, places it on a vessel, and sails for the Connecticut River; passes a small Dutch fort, The House of good hope, at Hartford, and, landing on the west bank, erects the first English house in Connecticut (now Windsor) October, 1633 Dutch at New Netherlands, with seventy men, make a feeble attempt to drive the settlers away......1634 Rev. Thomas Hooker, of Newtown (now Cambridge), Mass., advocates new settlements on the
rness......June, 1636 They reach the river early in......July, 1636 John Oldham murdered by the Indians near Block Island......July, 1636 War with the Pequods......July, 1636 [The Pequods, with at least 700 warriors, then occupied eastern Connecticut, and ruled part of Long Island.] An expedition against the Pequods and Indians on Block Island is sent from Massachusetts under John Endicott......Aug. 25–Sept. 14, 1630 [It exasperated, but did not subdue, the Indians.] Roger Williams, of Rhode Island, prevents a league between the Pequods and Narragansets......1636 Fort at Saybrook, at the mouth of the Connecticut, beleaguered by the Pequods all the winter of......1636-37 About thirty colonists of Connecticut killed by the Pequods during the winter of......1636-37 Court at Newtown (Hartford) applies to Massachusetts for aid against the Pequods......Feb. 21, 1637 [The name Newtown is changed to Hartford, Watertown to Wethersfield, and Dorchester to Windso
rris, Democrat, v. Bulkeley, Republican, the Supreme Court holds Bulkeley to be governor......Jan. 5, 1892 Daniel Grant, one of the famous triplets of Torrington, dies, aged seventy-one years, his two brothers surviving......Oct. 5, 1892 Celebration of the 250th anniversary of the founding of Stamford......Oct. 16, 1892 Governor Morris recommends constitutional revision......March, 1893 Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's cabin, dies at Hartford......July 1, 1896 President Dwight, of Yale, resigns his office......Nov. 17, 1898 Arthur T. Hadley elected president of Yale University......May 25, 1899 Sons of the Revolution of New York present the Nathan Hale school-house and grounds to East Haddam......June 6, 1900 Camp Field and a soldiers' monument at Hartford dedicated......Oct. 4, 1900 The following anniversaries were observed in 1900: East Haddam, bicentennial; Middletown, 250th year; Bridgeport, centennial; Trinity Parish, Fairfield, 175th year
Parliament to treat the Dutch as enemies, seize the Dutch house and lands at Hartford......1654 Death of Governor Haynes......1654 Law against Quakers: to be fined and sent out of jurisdiction......October, 1656 Gov. John Winthrop obtains for Connecticut a charter, with ample privileges, from Charles II......April 20, 1662 Charles II. grants a patent to his brother, the Duke of York, of extensive tracts, including the west side of Connecticut River......March 12, 1664 Col. Richard Nichols, governor of New York, and commissioners from Connecticut, fix the western boundary of Connecticut, beginning on the east side of Mamaroneck Creek and thence northnorthwest to the Massachusetts line. The southern line was determined to be the Sound, Connecticut losing her possessions on Long Island......Nov. 30, 1664 United colony elects John Winthrop governor......1665 Lyme made a town......May, 1667 Haddam made a town......October, 1668 Major Andros, the new governor of
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