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Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry van-cortlandt-philip
ought at Bemis's Heights and Saratoga. In the winter of 1778 he was sent to protect the New York frontiers against the Indians under Brant. He was a member of the court that tried General Arnold for improper conduct at Philadelphia, and was in favor of cashiering him. Had all the court, wrote Van Cortlandt in his diary, known Arnold's former conduct as well as myself, he would have been dismissed the service. In 1780 he commanded a regiment under Lafayette; was with him in Virginia; and for his gallant conduct at Yorktown was promoted to brigadiergeneral. At the close of the war he retired to the Manor-house. From 1788 to 1790 he was a member of the New York legislature, and also of the State convention that adopted the national Constitution. He was United States Senator from 1791 to 1794, and member of Congress from 1793 to 1809. Lafayette was accompanied by General Van Cortlandt in his tour through the United States in 1824-25. He died in Cortlandt Manor, N. Y., Nov. 5, 1831.
United States (United States) (search for this): entry van-cortlandt-philip
s gallant conduct at Yorktown was promoted to brigadiergeneral. At the close of the war he retired to the Manor-house. From 1788 to 1790 he was a member of the New York legislature, and also of the State convention that adopted the national Constitution. He was United States Senator from 1791 to 1794, and member of Congress from 1793 to 1809. Lafayette was accompanied by General Van Cortlandt in his tour through the United States in 1824-25. He died in Cortlandt Manor, N. Y., Nov. 5, 1831.s gallant conduct at Yorktown was promoted to brigadiergeneral. At the close of the war he retired to the Manor-house. From 1788 to 1790 he was a member of the New York legislature, and also of the State convention that adopted the national Constitution. He was United States Senator from 1791 to 1794, and member of Congress from 1793 to 1809. Lafayette was accompanied by General Van Cortlandt in his tour through the United States in 1824-25. He died in Cortlandt Manor, N. Y., Nov. 5, 1831.
of 1778 he was sent to protect the New York frontiers against the Indians under Brant. He was a member of the court that tried General Arnold for improper conduct at Philadelphia, and was in favor of cashiering him. Had all the court, wrote Van Cortlandt in his diary, known Arnold's former conduct as well as myself, he would have been dismissed the service. In 1780 he commanded a regiment under Lafayette; was with him in Virginia; and for his gallant conduct at Yorktown was promoted to brigas gallant conduct at Yorktown was promoted to brigadiergeneral. At the close of the war he retired to the Manor-house. From 1788 to 1790 he was a member of the New York legislature, and also of the State convention that adopted the national Constitution. He was United States Senator from 1791 to 1794, and member of Congress from 1793 to 1809. Lafayette was accompanied by General Van Cortlandt in his tour through the United States in 1824-25. He died in Cortlandt Manor, N. Y., Nov. 5, 1831.
came a land surveyor at the age of nineteen years, but when the Revolutionary War began he entered the military service as lieutenant-colonel. His Tory relatives had tried to dissuade him from this step, and Governor Tryon sent him a commission as colonel of militia, which he destroyed. In 1776 he was made colonel of the 2d New York Regiment, with which he fought at Bemis's Heights and Saratoga. In the winter of 1778 he was sent to protect the New York frontiers against the Indians under Brant. He was a member of the court that tried General Arnold for improper conduct at Philadelphia, and was in favor of cashiering him. Had all the court, wrote Van Cortlandt in his diary, known Arnold's former conduct as well as myself, he would have been dismissed the service. In 1780 he commanded a regiment under Lafayette; was with him in Virginia; and for his gallant conduct at Yorktown was promoted to brigadiergeneral. At the close of the war he retired to the Manor-house. From 1788 to 1
the 2d New York Regiment, with which he fought at Bemis's Heights and Saratoga. In the winter of 1778 he was sent to protect the New York frontiers against the Indians under Brant. He was a member of the court that tried General Arnold for improper conduct at Philadelphia, and was in favor of cashiering him. Had all the court, wrote Van Cortlandt in his diary, known Arnold's former conduct as well as myself, he would have been dismissed the service. In 1780 he commanded a regiment under Lafayette; was with him in Virginia; and for his gallant conduct at Yorktown was promoted to brigadiergeneral. At the close of the war he retired to the Manor-house. From 1788 to 1790 he was a member of the New York legislature, and also of the State convention that adopted the national Constitution. He was United States Senator from 1791 to 1794, and member of Congress from 1793 to 1809. Lafayette was accompanied by General Van Cortlandt in his tour through the United States in 1824-25. He die
Van Cortlandt, Philip 1749-1831 Military officer; born in Cortlandt Manor, N. Y., Sept. 1, 1749; son of Pierre Van Cortlandt; became a land surveyor at the age of nineteen years, but when the Revolutionary War began he entered the military service as lieutenant-colonel. His Tory relatives had tried to dissuade him from this step, and Governor Tryon sent him a commission as colonel of militia, which he destroyed. In 1776 he was made colonel of the 2d New York Regiment, with which he fought at Bemis's Heights and Saratoga. In the winter of 1778 he was sent to protect the New York frontiers against the Indians under Brant. He was a member of the court that tried General Arnold for improper conduct at Philadelphia, and was in favor of cashiering him. Had all the court, wrote Van Cortlandt in his diary, known Arnold's former conduct as well as myself, he would have been dismissed the service. In 1780 he commanded a regiment under Lafayette; was with him in Virginia; and for his
Van Cortlandt, Philip 1749-1831 Military officer; born in Cortlandt Manor, N. Y., Sept. 1, 1749; son of Pierre Van Cortlandt; became a land surveyor at the age of nineteen years, but when the Revolutionary War began he entered the military service as lieutenant-colonel. His Tory relatives had tried to dissuade him from this step, and Governor Tryon sent him a commission as colonel of militia, which he destroyed. In 1776 he was made colonel of the 2d New York Regiment, with which he fought at Bemis's Heights and Saratoga. In the winter of 1778 he was sent to protect the New York frontiers against the Indians under Brant. He was a member of the court that tried General Arnold for improper conduct at Philadelphia, and was in favor of cashiering him. Had all the court, wrote Van Cortlandt in his diary, known Arnold's former conduct as well as myself, he would have been dismissed the service. In 1780 he commanded a regiment under Lafayette; was with him in Virginia; and for his g
Van Cortlandt, Philip 1749-1831 Military officer; born in Cortlandt Manor, N. Y., Sept. 1, 1749; son of Pierre Van Cortlandt; became a land surveyor at the age of nineteen years, but when the Revolutionary War began he entered the military service as lieutenant-colonel. His Tory relatives had tried to dissuade him from this step, and Governor Tryon sent him a commission as colonel of militia, which he destroyed. In 1776 he was made colonel of the 2d New York Regiment, with which he fought at Bemis's Heights and Saratoga. In the winter of 1778 he was sent to protect the New York frontiers against the Indians under Brant. He was a member of the court that tried General Arnold for improper conduct at Philadelphia, and was in favor of cashiering him. Had all the court, wrote Van Cortlandt in his diary, known Arnold's former conduct as well as myself, he would have been dismissed the service. In 1780 he commanded a regiment under Lafayette; was with him in Virginia; and for his g
was made colonel of the 2d New York Regiment, with which he fought at Bemis's Heights and Saratoga. In the winter of 1778 he was sent to protect the New York frontiers against the Indians under Brant. He was a member of the court that tried General Arnold for improper conduct at Philadelphia, and was in favor of cashiering him. Had all the court, wrote Van Cortlandt in his diary, known Arnold's former conduct as well as myself, he would have been dismissed the service. In 1780 he commanded a Arnold's former conduct as well as myself, he would have been dismissed the service. In 1780 he commanded a regiment under Lafayette; was with him in Virginia; and for his gallant conduct at Yorktown was promoted to brigadiergeneral. At the close of the war he retired to the Manor-house. From 1788 to 1790 he was a member of the New York legislature, and also of the State convention that adopted the national Constitution. He was United States Senator from 1791 to 1794, and member of Congress from 1793 to 1809. Lafayette was accompanied by General Van Cortlandt in his tour through the United States
Van Cortlandt, Philip 1749-1831 Military officer; born in Cortlandt Manor, N. Y., Sept. 1, 1749; son of Pierre Van Cortlandt; became a land surveyor at the age of nineteen years, but when the Revolutionary War began he entered the military service as lieutenant-colonel. His Tory relatives had tried to dissuade him from this step, and Governor Tryon sent him a commission as colonel of militia, which he destroyed. In 1776 he was made colonel of the 2d New York Regiment, with which he fought at Bemis's Heights and Saratoga. In the winter of 1778 he was sent to protect the New York frontiers against the Indians under Brant. He was a member of the court that tried General Arnold for improper conduct at Philadelphia, and was in favor of cashiering him. Had all the court, wrote Van Cortlandt in his diary, known Arnold's former conduct as well as myself, he would have been dismissed the service. In 1780 he commanded a regiment under Lafayette; was with him in Virginia; and for his g
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