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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 32 total hits in 14 results.

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King's college (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry van-schaack-peter
Van Schaack, Peter 1747-1832 Jurist; born in Kinderhook, N. Y., March, 1747; was educated at King's College (now Columbia University), and had the reputation of being an accomplished classical scholar. While in college he married Elizabeth Cruger; and, choosing the law as a profession, entered the office of Mr. Sylvester, in Albany, concluding his studies with William Smith, Sr., in New York. Soon rising to eminence in his profession, he was appointed, at the age of twenty-six years, sole reviser of the colonial statutes. When the Revolutionary War broke out he was one of the New York committee of correspondence; but when the question, Shall the American colonies take up arms against Great Britain? had to be answered by every American citizen, his voice was in the negative, and during the war he was a conscientious loyalist, but maintained an attitude of strict neutrality. He did not escape persecution, for suspicion was everywhere keen-scented. The committee on conspiraci
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry van-schaack-peter
the Revolutionary War broke out he was one of the New York committee of correspondence; but when the question, Shall the American colonies take up arms against Great Britain? had to be answered by every American citizen, his voice was in the negative, and during the war he was a conscientious loyalist, but maintained an attitude ong his wife, who was dying with consumption, to New York, it was refused. She died, and he was banished from his native country in October, 1778, when he went to England, and remained there until the summer of 1785, when he returned home, and was received with open arms by men of all parties. While in England he had associated wiEngland he had associated with the most distinguished men of the realm, who regarded him as one of the brightest Americans among them, for his scholarship, legal attainments, and rare social qualities were remarkable. These made his mansion at Kinderhook the resort of some of the most eminent men of the land, and his society was sought continually. He died
Kinderhook (New York, United States) (search for this): entry van-schaack-peter
Van Schaack, Peter 1747-1832 Jurist; born in Kinderhook, N. Y., March, 1747; was educated at King's College (now Columbia University), and had the reputation of being an accomplished classical scholar. While in college he married Elizabeth Cruger; and, choosing the law as a profession, entered the office of Mr. Sylvester, in ealm, who regarded him as one of the brightest Americans among them, for his scholarship, legal attainments, and rare social qualities were remarkable. These made his mansion at Kinderhook the resort of some of the most eminent men of the land, and his society was sought continually. He died in Kinderhook, N. Y., Sept. 17, 1832.realm, who regarded him as one of the brightest Americans among them, for his scholarship, legal attainments, and rare social qualities were remarkable. These made his mansion at Kinderhook the resort of some of the most eminent men of the land, and his society was sought continually. He died in Kinderhook, N. Y., Sept. 17, 1832.
Van Schaack, Peter 1747-1832 Jurist; born in Kinderhook, N. Y., March, 1747; was educated at King's College (now Columbia University), and had the reputation of being an accomplished classical scholar. While in college he married Elizabeth Cruger; and, choosing the law as a profession, entered the office of Mr. Sylvester, in Albany, concluding his studies with William Smith, Sr., in New York. Soon rising to eminence in his profession, he was appointed, at the age of twenty-six years, sole reviser of the colonial statutes. When the Revolutionary War broke out he was one of the New York committee of correspondence; but when the question, Shall the American colonies take up arms against Great Britain? had to be answered by every American citizen, his voice was in the negative, and during the war he was a conscientious loyalist, but maintained an attitude of strict neutrality. He did not escape persecution, for suspicion was everywhere keen-scented. The committee on conspiraci
Van Schaack, Peter 1747-1832 Jurist; born in Kinderhook, N. Y., March, 1747; was educated at King's College (now Columbia University), and had the reputation of being an accomplished classical scholar. While in college he married Elizabeth Cruger; and, choosing the law as a profession, entered the office of Mr. Sylvester, in Albany, concluding his studies with William Smith, Sr., in New York. Soon rising to eminence in his profession, he was appointed, at the age of twenty-six years, sole reviser of the colonial statutes. When the Revolutionary War broke out he was one of the New York committee of correspondence; but when the question, Shall the American colonies take up arms against Great Britain? had to be answered by every American citizen, his voice was in the negative, and during the war he was a conscientious loyalist, but maintained an attitude of strict neutrality. He did not escape persecution, for suspicion was everywhere keen-scented. The committee on conspiraci
Van Schaack, Peter 1747-1832 Jurist; born in Kinderhook, N. Y., March, 1747; was educated at King's College (now Columbia University), and had the reputation of being an accomplished classical scholar. While in college he married Elizabeth Cruger; and, choosing the law as a profession, entered the office of Mr. Sylvester, in Albany, concluding his studies with William Smith, Sr., in New York. Soon rising to eminence in his profession, he was appointed, at the age of twenty-six years, sole reviser of the colonial statutes. When the Revolutionary War broke out he was one of the New York committee of correspondence; but when the question, Shall the American colonies take up arms against Great Britain? had to be answered by every American citizen, his voice was in the negative, and during the war he was a conscientious loyalist, but maintained an attitude of strict neutrality. He did not escape persecution, for suspicion was everywhere keen-scented. The committee on conspiraci
Van Schaack, Peter 1747-1832 Jurist; born in Kinderhook, N. Y., March, 1747; was educated at King's College (now Columbia University), and had the reputation of being an accomplished classical scholar. While in college he married Elizabeth Cruger; and, choosing the law as a profession, entered the office of Mr. Sylvester, in Albany, concluding his studies with William Smith, Sr., in New York. Soon rising to eminence in his profession, he was appointed, at the age of twenty-six years, sole reviser of the colonial statutes. When the Revolutionary War broke out he was one of the New York committee of correspondence; but when the question, Shall the American colonies take up arms against Great Britain? had to be answered by every American citizen, his voice was in the negative, and during the war he was a conscientious loyalist, but maintained an attitude of strict neutrality. He did not escape persecution, for suspicion was everywhere keen-scented. The committee on conspirac
escape persecution, for suspicion was everywhere keen-scented. The committee on conspiracies at Albany summoned him before them (June, 1777), and required him to take the oath of allegiance to the Continental Congress. He refused, and was ordered to Boston within ten days. From that time he was constantly restrained; and when he asked the privilege of taking his wife, who was dying with consumption, to New York, it was refused. She died, and he was banished from his native country in October, 1778, when he went to England, and remained there until the summer of 1785, when he returned home, and was received with open arms by men of all parties. While in England he had associated with the most distinguished men of the realm, who regarded him as one of the brightest Americans among them, for his scholarship, legal attainments, and rare social qualities were remarkable. These made his mansion at Kinderhook the resort of some of the most eminent men of the land, and his society was s
Van Schaack, Peter 1747-1832 Jurist; born in Kinderhook, N. Y., March, 1747; was educated at King's College (now Columbia University), and had the reputation of being an accomplished classical scholar. While in college he married Elizabeth Cruger; and, choosing the law as a profession, entered the office of Mr. Sylvester, in Albany, concluding his studies with William Smith, Sr., in New York. Soon rising to eminence in his profession, he was appointed, at the age of twenty-six years, sole reviser of the colonial statutes. When the Revolutionary War broke out he was one of the New York committee of correspondence; but when the question, Shall the American colonies take up arms against Great Britain? had to be answered by every American citizen, his voice was in the negative, and during the war he was a conscientious loyalist, but maintained an attitude of strict neutrality. He did not escape persecution, for suspicion was everywhere keen-scented. The committee on conspirac
Van Schaack, Peter 1747-1832 Jurist; born in Kinderhook, N. Y., March, 1747; was educated at King's College (now Columbia University), and had the reputation of being an accomplished classical scholar. While in college he married Elizabeth Cruger; and, choosing the law as a profession, entered the office of Mr. Sylvester, in Albany, concluding his studies with William Smith, Sr., in New York. Soon rising to eminence in his profession, he was appointed, at the age of twenty-six years, sole reviser of the colonial statutes. When the Revolutionary War broke out he was one of the New York committee of correspondence; but when the question, Shall the American colonies take up arms against Great Britain? had to be answered by every American citizen, his voice was in the negative, and during the war he was a conscientious loyalist, but maintained an attitude of strict neutrality. He did not escape persecution, for suspicion was everywhere keen-scented. The committee on conspiraci
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