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ptain-general, but SeƱor Canovas was not brought into sympathy with this feeling. Weyler, on Jan. 11, 1897, announced that three provinces were pacified, and in spite of this news, reassuring in the Spanish capital, he again took the field, and spread destruction and ruin throughout the province of Matanzas, one of the pacified districts. Gomez succeeded in eluding Weyler in Matanzas, and only a few skirmishes ensued. These were reported as Spanish victories. Weyler next advanced into Santa Clara, where he was clearly outwitted by Gomez, but here again he had recourse to the torch. The captain-general was again in Havana on March 5, and on March 23 he instituted his unsuccessful campaign against Garcia. He was ordered to return to Havana on Sept. 5, and was succeeded as captain-general by Gen. Ramon Y Arenas Blanco (q. v.). After his return to Madrid the government decided to try him by court-martial for the publication of an address to the Queen Regent protesting against Pre
ympathy with this feeling. Weyler, on Jan. 11, 1897, announced that three provinces were pacified, and in spite of this news, reassuring in the Spanish capital, he again took the field, and spread destruction and ruin throughout the province of Matanzas, one of the pacified districts. Gomez succeeded in eluding Weyler in Matanzas, and only a few skirmishes ensued. These were reported as Spanish victories. Weyler next advanced into Santa Clara, where he was clearly outwitted by Gomez, but herMatanzas, and only a few skirmishes ensued. These were reported as Spanish victories. Weyler next advanced into Santa Clara, where he was clearly outwitted by Gomez, but here again he had recourse to the torch. The captain-general was again in Havana on March 5, and on March 23 he instituted his unsuccessful campaign against Garcia. He was ordered to return to Havana on Sept. 5, and was succeeded as captain-general by Gen. Ramon Y Arenas Blanco (q. v.). After his return to Madrid the government decided to try him by court-martial for the publication of an address to the Queen Regent protesting against President McKinley's criticism of his rule in Cuba, but he
Spanish War against the Moors in Africa. General Weyler was sent to Cuba in the early General Weyler. part of the Ten Years War and served nts against him for alleged cruelty. It was during this campaign in Cuba that he received his title of The butcher. While there, his troops,n Camaguey. In January, 1896, he was appointed captain-general of Cuba to succeed Gen. Martinez Campos. He landed at Havana, Feb. 10, and of the enemy's movements. In a proclamation to the inhabitants of Cuba, he said: I take charge with the confidence which never abandose the government of his Majesty when in its wisdom, having peace in Cuba, it should think it convenient to give this country reforms with theer gives all things to her children. Inhabitants of the island of Cuba, lend me your help. So you will defend your interests, which are thent protesting against President McKinley's criticism of his rule in Cuba, but he defied the authorities to take proceedings against him; apo
Cuba to succeed Gen. Martinez Campos. He landed at Havana, Feb. 10, and on the same day issued several addre with this requirement will be detained and sent to Havana, subject to my orders. In case of doubt as to the ntion was paid to Gomez, who was in the province of Havana. Ten engagements were fought against Maceo's forcet will, and crossed the trocha into the province of Havana, despite the Spanish forces stationed there in antied headquarters on the line of the railroad between Havana and Pinar del Rio City, and several skirmishes ensuof wounded Spanish soldiers found their way back to Havana. Then came the coup resulting in the death of Maceer Major Cirujada's command, and Weyler returned to Havana. He announced with complacency that Pinar del Rio rse to the torch. The captain-general was again in Havana on March 5, and on March 23 he instituted his unsucmpaign against Garcia. He was ordered to return to Havana on Sept. 5, and was succeeded as captain-general by
again in Havana on March 5, and on March 23 he instituted his unsuccessful campaign against Garcia. He was ordered to return to Havana on Sept. 5, and was succeeded as captain-general by Gen. Ramon Y Arenas Blanco (q. v.). After his return to Madrid the government decided to try him by court-martial for the publication of an address to the Queen Regent protesting against President McKinley's criticism of his rule in Cuba, but he defied the authorities to take proceedings against him; apolog to return to Havana on Sept. 5, and was succeeded as captain-general by Gen. Ramon Y Arenas Blanco (q. v.). After his return to Madrid the government decided to try him by court-martial for the publication of an address to the Queen Regent protesting against President McKinley's criticism of his rule in Cuba, but he defied the authorities to take proceedings against him; apologized to the Queen Regent; and on Oct. 20, 1900, was appointed captain-general of Madrid. See Cuba; reconcentrados.
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): entry weyler-y-nicolau-valeriano
Weyler y Nicolau, Valeriano 1840- Military officer; born in Spain in 1840; became a lieutenant-general in the Spanish army and captain-general of the Canary Islands when thirty-nine years old as a reward for his services in the Santo Domingo campaign. He distinguished himself during the Carlist War, and attracted attention to himself during the Spanish War against the Moors in Africa. General Weyler was sent to Cuba in the early General Weyler. part of the Ten Years War and served under two captain-generals. He remained there more than two years and was sent back to Spain on account of complaints against him for alleged cruelty. It was during this campaign in Cuba that he received his title of The butcher. While there, his troops, with his knowledge, committed dreadful outrages in the province of Santiago, and especially in Camaguey. In January, 1896, he was appointed captain-general of Cuba to succeed Gen. Martinez Campos. He landed at Havana, Feb. 10, and on the same
e field, and spread destruction and ruin throughout the province of Matanzas, one of the pacified districts. Gomez succeeded in eluding Weyler in Matanzas, and only a few skirmishes ensued. These were reported as Spanish victories. Weyler next advanced into Santa Clara, where he was clearly outwitted by Gomez, but here again he had recourse to the torch. The captain-general was again in Havana on March 5, and on March 23 he instituted his unsuccessful campaign against Garcia. He was ordered to return to Havana on Sept. 5, and was succeeded as captain-general by Gen. Ramon Y Arenas Blanco (q. v.). After his return to Madrid the government decided to try him by court-martial for the publication of an address to the Queen Regent protesting against President McKinley's criticism of his rule in Cuba, but he defied the authorities to take proceedings against him; apologized to the Queen Regent; and on Oct. 20, 1900, was appointed captain-general of Madrid. See Cuba; reconcentrados.
All passes issued prior to this date are hereby cancelled. His first important military movement was that against General Maceo, in the western part of the province of Pinar del Rio. No attention was paid to Gomez, who was in the province of Havana. Ten engagements were fought against Maceo's forces within fifteen days, with no appreciable advantage to the Spaniards. Maceo, gifted in this general warfare, experienced no difficulty in moving his forces at will, and crossed the trocha inMaceo, gifted in this general warfare, experienced no difficulty in moving his forces at will, and crossed the trocha into the province of Havana, despite the Spanish forces stationed there in anticipation of such a manoeuvre. After a succession of unimportant operations the rainy season practically put an end to further developments. In the mean time reinforcementntinuous stream of wounded Spanish soldiers found their way back to Havana. Then came the coup resulting in the death of Maceo by the troops under Major Cirujada's command, and Weyler returned to Havana. He announced with complacency that Pinar de
General Weyler. part of the Ten Years War and served under two captain-generals. He remained there more than two years and was sent back to Spain on account of complaints against him for alleged cruelty. It was during this campaign in Cuba that he received his title of The butcher. While there, his troops, with his knowledge, committed dreadful outrages in the province of Santiago, and especially in Camaguey. In January, 1896, he was appointed captain-general of Cuba to succeed Gen. Martinez Campos. He landed at Havana, Feb. 10, and on the same day issued several addresses. To the military and civil authorities he said: It is quite impossible to concede that the status of the rebellion and the manner in which the rebel chiefs have overrun the island, the active pursuit by our troops being unable to check them, indicates indifference or a lack of spirit on the part of the inhabitants, for I do not understand how property holders can remain inactive and neutral while thei
y movement was that against General Maceo, in the western part of the province of Pinar del Rio. No attention was paid to Gomez, who was in the province of Havana. Ten engagements were fought against Maceo's forces within fifteen days, with no apurned to Havana. He announced with complacency that Pinar del Rio was free from rebels. His second campaign was against Gomez. In the mean time the Spanish press had succeeded in arousing a feeling of dissatisfaction with the captain-general, butgain took the field, and spread destruction and ruin throughout the province of Matanzas, one of the pacified districts. Gomez succeeded in eluding Weyler in Matanzas, and only a few skirmishes ensued. These were reported as Spanish victories. Weyler next advanced into Santa Clara, where he was clearly outwitted by Gomez, but here again he had recourse to the torch. The captain-general was again in Havana on March 5, and on March 23 he instituted his unsuccessful campaign against Garcia.
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