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Fort William Henry, New York (New York, United States) (search for this): entry william-henry-fort-capture-of
of July, 1757, with nearly 9,000 men, of whom about 2,000 were Indians, and moved against Fort William Henry, built by Sir William Johnson, at the head of Lake George. It was garrisoned by about 3,0ed, for they expected blood and booty. When the English had entered the woods a mile from Fort William Henry, the savages fell upon them, and slew a large number of men, women, and children, before Mrrison (plundering them in their flight) to within about cannon-shot of Fort Edward. Then Fort William Henry and all its appendages were destroyed, and it was never rebuilt. Plan of Fort William HFort William Henry. A, dock; B, garrison gardens; C, Fort William Henry; D, morass; E, Montcalm's 1st battery of nine guns and two mortars; F, Montcalm's 2d battery of ten guns and three mortars; G, Montcalm's aFort William Henry; D, morass; E, Montcalm's 1st battery of nine guns and two mortars; F, Montcalm's 2d battery of ten guns and three mortars; G, Montcalm's approaches; H, two intended batteries; I, place where Montcalm landed his artillery; K, Montcalm's camp, with the main body of the army; L, M. de Levy's camp—4, 1000 regulars and Canadians; M, M. de la
Lake George, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): entry william-henry-fort-capture-of
William Henry, Fort, capture of Montcalm left Ticonderoga towards the close of July, 1757, with nearly 9,000 men, of whom about 2,000 were Indians, and moved against Fort William Henry, built by Sir William Johnson, at the head of Lake George. It was garrisoned by about 3,000 troops, under Colonel Munro, a brave English officer, who felt strong in his position because of the close proximity of 4,000 English troops, under General Webb, at Fort Edward, only 15 miles distant. Webb was Munro's commanding general. When Montcalm demanded (Aug. 1) the surrender of the post and garrison, the colonel refused, and sent an express to General Webb for aid. For six days Montcalm continued the siege, and daily expresses were sent to Webb asking aid, but none was furnished. One day General Johnson, with a corps of provincials and Putnam's Rangers, had marched a few miles in that direction, when they were recalled, and Webb sent a letter to Munro advising him to surrender. This letter was i
Oswego (New York, United States) (search for this): entry william-henry-fort-capture-of
, and children, before Montcalm could stay the slaughter. The Indians pursued the terrified garrison (plundering them in their flight) to within about cannon-shot of Fort Edward. Then Fort William Henry and all its appendages were destroyed, and it was never rebuilt. Plan of Fort William Henry. A, dock; B, garrison gardens; C, Fort William Henry; D, morass; E, Montcalm's 1st battery of nine guns and two mortars; F, Montcalm's 2d battery of ten guns and three mortars; G, Montcalm's approaches; H, two intended batteries; I, place where Montcalm landed his artillery; K, Montcalm's camp, with the main body of the army; L, M. de Levy's camp—4, 1000 regulars and Canadians; M, M. de la Corne, with 1,500 Canadians and Indians; N, English encampment before the retrenchment was made; O, the bridge over the morass; P, the English retrenchment. Subsequently a hotel was built on its site. The fall of that fort caused greater alarm in the colonies than the loss of Oswego the year befor
Fort Edward (New York, United States) (search for this): entry william-henry-fort-capture-of
ps, under Colonel Munro, a brave English officer, who felt strong in his position because of the close proximity of 4,000 English troops, under General Webb, at Fort Edward, only 15 miles distant. Webb was Munro's commanding general. When Montcalm demanded (Aug. 1) the surrender of the post and garrison, the colonel refused, and sg further resistance to be useless, for his ammunition was exhausted, he yielded, Montcalm agreeing to an honorable surrender and a safe escort of the troops to Fort Edward. The Indians were disappointed, for they expected blood and booty. When the English had entered the woods a mile from Fort William Henry, the savages fell upochildren, before Montcalm could stay the slaughter. The Indians pursued the terrified garrison (plundering them in their flight) to within about cannon-shot of Fort Edward. Then Fort William Henry and all its appendages were destroyed, and it was never rebuilt. Plan of Fort William Henry. A, dock; B, garrison gardens; C, Fo
Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): entry william-henry-fort-capture-of
William Henry, Fort, capture of Montcalm left Ticonderoga towards the close of July, 1757, with nearly 9,000 men, of whom about 2,000 were Indians, and moved against Fort William Henry, built by Sir William Johnson, at the head of Lake George. It was garrisoned by about 3,000 troops, under Colonel Munro, a brave English officer, who felt strong in his position because of the close proximity of 4,000 English troops, under General Webb, at Fort Edward, only 15 miles distant. Webb was Munro's commanding general. When Montcalm demanded (Aug. 1) the surrender of the post and garrison, the colonel refused, and sent an express to General Webb for aid. For six days Montcalm continued the siege, and daily expresses were sent to Webb asking aid, but none was furnished. One day General Johnson, with a corps of provincials and Putnam's Rangers, had marched a few miles in that direction, when they were recalled, and Webb sent a letter to Munro advising him to surrender. This letter was i
, and children, before Montcalm could stay the slaughter. The Indians pursued the terrified garrison (plundering them in their flight) to within about cannon-shot of Fort Edward. Then Fort William Henry and all its appendages were destroyed, and it was never rebuilt. Plan of Fort William Henry. A, dock; B, garrison gardens; C, Fort William Henry; D, morass; E, Montcalm's 1st battery of nine guns and two mortars; F, Montcalm's 2d battery of ten guns and three mortars; G, Montcalm's approaches; H, two intended batteries; I, place where Montcalm landed his artillery; K, Montcalm's camp, with the main body of the army; L, M. de Levy's camp—4, 1000 regulars and Canadians; M, M. de la Corne, with 1,500 Canadians and Indians; N, English encampment before the retrenchment was made; O, the bridge over the morass; P, the English retrenchment. Subsequently a hotel was built on its site. The fall of that fort caused greater alarm in the colonies than the loss of Oswego the year befor
who felt strong in his position because of the close proximity of 4,000 English troops, under General Webb, at Fort Edward, only 15 miles distant. Webb was Munro's commanding general. When Montcalm dWebb was Munro's commanding general. When Montcalm demanded (Aug. 1) the surrender of the post and garrison, the colonel refused, and sent an express to General Webb for aid. For six days Montcalm continued the siege, and daily expresses were sent to WGeneral Webb for aid. For six days Montcalm continued the siege, and daily expresses were sent to Webb asking aid, but none was furnished. One day General Johnson, with a corps of provincials and Putnam's Rangers, had marched a few miles in that direction, when they were recalled, and Webb sent a Webb asking aid, but none was furnished. One day General Johnson, with a corps of provincials and Putnam's Rangers, had marched a few miles in that direction, when they were recalled, and Webb sent a letter to Munro advising him to surrender. This letter was intercepted, and Montcalm sent it to Munro, with a peremptory demand for his instant surrender. Perceiving further resistance to be uselessWebb sent a letter to Munro advising him to surrender. This letter was intercepted, and Montcalm sent it to Munro, with a peremptory demand for his instant surrender. Perceiving further resistance to be useless, for his ammunition was exhausted, he yielded, Montcalm agreeing to an honorable surrender and a safe escort of the troops to Fort Edward. The Indians were disappointed, for they expected blood and
William Henry, Fort, capture of Montcalm left Ticonderoga towards the close of July, 1757, with nearly 9,000 men, of whom about 2,000 were Indians, and moved against Fort William Henry, built by Sir William Johnson, at the head of Lake George. It was garrisoned by about 3,000 troops, under Colonel Munro, a brave English officer, who felt strong in his position because of the close proximity of 4,000 English troops, under General Webb, at Fort Edward, only 15 miles distant. Webb was Munro (Aug. 1) the surrender of the post and garrison, the colonel refused, and sent an express to General Webb for aid. For six days Montcalm continued the siege, and daily expresses were sent to Webb asking aid, but none was furnished. One day General Johnson, with a corps of provincials and Putnam's Rangers, had marched a few miles in that direction, when they were recalled, and Webb sent a letter to Munro advising him to surrender. This letter was intercepted, and Montcalm sent it to Munro, wi
liam Henry, built by Sir William Johnson, at the head of Lake George. It was garrisoned by about 3,000 troops, under Colonel Munro, a brave English officer, who felt strong in his position because of the close proximity of 4,000 English troops, under General Webb, at Fort Edward, only 15 miles distant. Webb was Munro's commanding general. When Montcalm demanded (Aug. 1) the surrender of the post and garrison, the colonel refused, and sent an express to General Webb for aid. For six days Montcials and Putnam's Rangers, had marched a few miles in that direction, when they were recalled, and Webb sent a letter to Munro advising him to surrender. This letter was intercepted, and Montcalm sent it to Munro, with a peremptory demand for his Munro, with a peremptory demand for his instant surrender. Perceiving further resistance to be useless, for his ammunition was exhausted, he yielded, Montcalm agreeing to an honorable surrender and a safe escort of the troops to Fort Edward. The Indians were disappointed, for they expec
ho felt strong in his position because of the close proximity of 4,000 English troops, under General Webb, at Fort Edward, only 15 miles distant. Webb was Munro's commanding general. When Montcalm demanded (Aug. 1) the surrender of the post and garrison, the colonel refused, and sent an express to General Webb for aid. For six days Montcalm continued the siege, and daily expresses were sent to Webb asking aid, but none was furnished. One day General Johnson, with a corps of provincials and Putnam's Rangers, had marched a few miles in that direction, when they were recalled, and Webb sent a letter to Munro advising him to surrender. This letter was intercepted, and Montcalm sent it to Munro, with a peremptory demand for his instant surrender. Perceiving further resistance to be useless, for his ammunition was exhausted, he yielded, Montcalm agreeing to an honorable surrender and a safe escort of the troops to Fort Edward. The Indians were disappointed, for they expected blood and b
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