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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 34 total hits in 16 results.

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Hartford County (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry windsor
Windsor, A town in Hartford county, Conn., on the Connecticut and Farmington rivers, containing several villages, and principally engaged in agriculture and the manufacture of paper, spool silk, cotton warps, and machinery. The town was settled under the leadership of Roger Ludlow, a distinguished jurist and the reputed author of the constitution adopted by the towns of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield, the union of which constituted the commonwealth of Connecticut, in 1639 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here was erected in 1644. Windsor contains the home of Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth, of the United States Supreme Court, and many valuable colonial relics, and was the burialplace of Capt. John Mason, who conquered the Pequod Indians, Chief-Justice Ellsworth, the Rev. Ephraim Hewit, Gov. Roger Wolcott, and other colonial and Revolutionary celebrities.
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry windsor
Windsor, A town in Hartford county, Conn., on the Connecticut and Farmington rivers, containing several villages, and principally engaged in agriculture and the manufacture of paper, spool silk, cotton warps, and machinery. The town was settled under the leadership of Roger Ludlow, a distinguished jurist and the reputed author of the constitution adopted by the towns of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield, the union of which constituted the commonwealth of Connecticut, in 1639 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here was erected in 1644. Windsor contains the home of Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth, of the United States Supreme Court, and many valuable colonial relics, and was the burialplace of Capt. John Mason, who conquered the Pequod Indians, Chief-Justice Ellsworth, the Rev. Ephraim Hewit, Gov. Roger Wolcott, and other colonial and Revolutionary celebrities.
Connecticut River (United States) (search for this): entry windsor
Windsor, A town in Hartford county, Conn., on the Connecticut and Farmington rivers, containing several villages, and principally engaged in agriculture and the manufacture of paper, spool silk, cotton warps, and machinery. The town was settled under the leadership of Roger Ludlow, a distinguished jurist and the reputed author of the constitution adopted by the towns of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield, the union of which constituted the commonwealth of Connecticut, in 1639 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here was erected in 1644. Windsor contains the home of Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth, of the United States Supreme Court, and many valuable colonial relics, and was the burialplace of Capt. John Mason, who conquered the Pequod Indians, Chief-Justice Ellsworth, the Rev. Ephraim Hewit, Gov. Roger Wolcott, and other colonial and Revolutionary celebrities.
West Branch Farmington River (United States) (search for this): entry windsor
Windsor, A town in Hartford county, Conn., on the Connecticut and Farmington rivers, containing several villages, and principally engaged in agriculture and the manufacture of paper, spool silk, cotton warps, and machinery. The town was settled under the leadership of Roger Ludlow, a distinguished jurist and the reputed author of the constitution adopted by the towns of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield, the union of which constituted the commonwealth of Connecticut, in 1639 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here was erected in 1644. Windsor contains the home of Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth, of the United States Supreme Court, and many valuable colonial relics, and was the burialplace of Capt. John Mason, who conquered the Pequod Indians, Chief-Justice Ellsworth, the Rev. Ephraim Hewit, Gov. Roger Wolcott, and other colonial and Revolutionary celebrities.
Windsor, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry windsor
y engaged in agriculture and the manufacture of paper, spool silk, cotton warps, and machinery. The town was settled under the leadership of Roger Ludlow, a distinguished jurist and the reputed author of the constitution adopted by the towns of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield, the union of which constituted the commonwealth of Connecticut, in 1639 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here 39 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here was erected in 1644. Windsor contains the home of Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth, of the United States Supreme Court, and many valuable colonial relics, and was the burialplace of Capt. John Mason, who conquered the Pequod Indians, Chief-Justice Ellsworth, the Rev. Ephraim Hewit, Gov. Roger Wolcott, and other colonial and Revolutionary celebrities.
Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry windsor
Windsor, A town in Hartford county, Conn., on the Connecticut and Farmington rivers, containing several villages, and principally engaged in agriculture and the manufacture of paper, spool silk, cotton warps, and machinery. The town was settled under the leadership of Roger Ludlow, a distinguished jurist and the reputed author of the constitution adopted by the towns of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield, the union of which constituted the commonwealth of Connecticut, in 1639 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here was erected in 1644. Windsor contains the home of Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth, of the United States Supreme Court, and many valuable colonial relics, and was the burialplace of Capt. John Mason, who conquered the Pequod Indians, Chief-Justice Ellsworth, the Rev. Ephraim Hewit, Gov. Roger Wolcott, and other colonial and Revolutionary celebrities.
Wethersfield (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry windsor
Windsor, A town in Hartford county, Conn., on the Connecticut and Farmington rivers, containing several villages, and principally engaged in agriculture and the manufacture of paper, spool silk, cotton warps, and machinery. The town was settled under the leadership of Roger Ludlow, a distinguished jurist and the reputed author of the constitution adopted by the towns of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield, the union of which constituted the commonwealth of Connecticut, in 1639 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here was erected in 1644. Windsor contains the home of Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth, of the United States Supreme Court, and many valuable colonial relics, and was the burialplace of Capt. John Mason, who conquered the Pequod Indians, Chief-Justice Ellsworth, the Rev. Ephraim Hewit, Gov. Roger Wolcott, and other colonial and Revolutionary celebrities.
Oliver Ellsworth (search for this): entry windsor
he commonwealth of Connecticut, in 1639 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here was erected in 1644. Windsor contains the home of Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth, of the United States Supreme Court, and many valuable colonial relics, and was the burialplace of Capt. John Mason, who conquered the Pequod Indians, Chief-Justice Ellsworth, the Rev. Ephraim Hewit, Gov. Roger Wolcott, and other col39 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here was erected in 1644. Windsor contains the home of Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth, of the United States Supreme Court, and many valuable colonial relics, and was the burialplace of Capt. John Mason, who conquered the Pequod Indians, Chief-Justice Ellsworth, the Rev. Ephraim Hewit, Gov. Roger Wolcott, and other colonial and Revolutionary celebrities.
Ephraim Hewit (search for this): entry windsor
Windsor, A town in Hartford county, Conn., on the Connecticut and Farmington rivers, containing several villages, and principally engaged in agriculture and the manufacture of paper, spool silk, cotton warps, and machinery. The town was settled under the leadership of Roger Ludlow, a distinguished jurist and the reputed author of the constitution adopted by the towns of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield, the union of which constituted the commonwealth of Connecticut, in 1639 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here was erected in 1644. Windsor contains the home of Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth, of the United States Supreme Court, and many valuable colonial relics, and was the burialplace of Capt. John Mason, who conquered the Pequod Indians, Chief-Justice Ellsworth, the Rev. Ephraim Hewit, Gov. Roger Wolcott, and other colonial and Revolutionary celebrities.
Roger Ludlow (search for this): entry windsor
Windsor, A town in Hartford county, Conn., on the Connecticut and Farmington rivers, containing several villages, and principally engaged in agriculture and the manufacture of paper, spool silk, cotton warps, and machinery. The town was settled under the leadership of Roger Ludlow, a distinguished jurist and the reputed author of the constitution adopted by the towns of Windsor, Hartford, and Wethersfield, the union of which constituted the commonwealth of Connecticut, in 1639 (see Connecticut). The settlement dates from 1637, the place receiving its name in February of that year. The first Congregational church here was erected in 1644. Windsor contains the home of Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth, of the United States Supreme Court, and many valuable colonial relics, and was the burialplace of Capt. John Mason, who conquered the Pequod Indians, Chief-Justice Ellsworth, the Rev. Ephraim Hewit, Gov. Roger Wolcott, and other colonial and Revolutionary celebrities.
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