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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 68 total hits in 36 results.

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Litchfield (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry wolcott-oliver
Wolcott, Oliver 1747-1797 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Windsor, Conn., Nov. 26, 172;; graduated at Yale College in 1747; began studying medicine, but on being appointed sheriff of Litchfield county, in 1751, he abandoned it. He was in the council twelve years (1774-86); also a major-general of militia, and judge of the county court of common pleas and of probate. In 1775 Congress appointed him a commissioner of Indian affairs to secure the neutrality of the Six Nations, and he became a member of Congress in January, 1776. After the Declaration of Independence he returned to Connecticut, invested with the command of the militia intended for the defence of New York, and in November resumed his seat in Congress. Late in the summer of 1777 he joined the army under Gates with several hundred volunteers, and assisted in the capture of Burgoyne and his army. On the field of Saratoga he was made a brigadier-general in the Continental service. In 1786 he was c
Litchfield, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry wolcott-oliver
and his army. On the field of Saratoga he was made a brigadier-general in the Continental service. In 1786 he was chosen lieutenant-governor of Connecticut, and served in that capacity ten years, when he was elected governor. He died in Litchfield, Conn., Dec. 1, 1797. Financier; born in Litchfield, Conn., Jan. 11, 1760; a son of the preceding; graduated at Yale College in 1778, and was a volunteer to repel the British and Hessian marauders on the Connecticut coast towns in 1779. He bLitchfield, Conn., Jan. 11, 1760; a son of the preceding; graduated at Yale College in 1778, and was a volunteer to repel the British and Hessian marauders on the Connecticut coast towns in 1779. He became a volunteer aide to his father, and was afterwards a commissary officer. Admitted to the bar in 1781, he was employed in the financial affairs of Connecticut; and in 1784 was appointed a commissioner to settle its accounts with the United States. He was comptroller of national accounts in 1788-89, auditor of the United States treasury front 1789 to 1791, comptroller from 1791 to 1795, and Secretary of the Treasury from 1795 to 1800, when he was appointed United States circuit judge. I
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry wolcott-oliver
ix Nations, and he became a member of Congress in January, 1776. After the Declaration of Independence he returned to Connecticut, invested with the command of the militia intended for the defence of New York, and in November resumed his seat in Co of Saratoga he was made a brigadier-general in the Continental service. In 1786 he was chosen lieutenant-governor of Connecticut, and served in that capacity ten years, when he was elected governor. He died in Litchfield, Conn., Dec. 1, 1797. er, and was afterwards a commissary officer. Admitted to the bar in 1781, he was employed in the financial affairs of Connecticut; and in 1784 was appointed a commissioner to settle its accounts with the United States. He was comptroller of nation which he continued until the breaking out of the War of 1812-15, when, with his son, he established an extensive manufactory of textile goods at Wolcottville, Conn. He was governor of Connecticut in 1818-27. He died in New York City, June 1, 1833.
United States (United States) (search for this): entry wolcott-oliver
He became a volunteer aide to his father, and was afterwards a commissary officer. Admitted to the bar in 1781, he was employed in the financial affairs of Connecticut; and in 1784 was appointed a commissioner to settle its accounts with the United States. He was comptroller of national accounts in 1788-89, auditor of the United States treasury front 1789 to 1791, comptroller from 1791 to 1795, and Secretary of the Treasury from 1795 to 1800, when he was appointed United States circuit judgeitor of the United States treasury front 1789 to 1791, comptroller from 1791 to 1795, and Secretary of the Treasury from 1795 to 1800, when he was appointed United States circuit judge. In 1802 he engaged in mercantile business in New York City, in which he continued until the breaking out of the War of 1812-15, when, with his son, he established an extensive manufactory of textile goods at Wolcottville, Conn. He was governor of Connecticut in 1818-27. He died in New York City, June 1, 1833.
Torrington (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry wolcott-oliver
Conn., Jan. 11, 1760; a son of the preceding; graduated at Yale College in 1778, and was a volunteer to repel the British and Hessian marauders on the Connecticut coast towns in 1779. He became a volunteer aide to his father, and was afterwards a commissary officer. Admitted to the bar in 1781, he was employed in the financial affairs of Connecticut; and in 1784 was appointed a commissioner to settle its accounts with the United States. He was comptroller of national accounts in 1788-89, auditor of the United States treasury front 1789 to 1791, comptroller from 1791 to 1795, and Secretary of the Treasury from 1795 to 1800, when he was appointed United States circuit judge. In 1802 he engaged in mercantile business in New York City, in which he continued until the breaking out of the War of 1812-15, when, with his son, he established an extensive manufactory of textile goods at Wolcottville, Conn. He was governor of Connecticut in 1818-27. He died in New York City, June 1, 1833.
Windsor, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): entry wolcott-oliver
Wolcott, Oliver 1747-1797 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Windsor, Conn., Nov. 26, 172;; graduated at Yale College in 1747; began studying medicine, but on being appointed sheriff of Litchfield county, in 1751, he abandoned it. He was in the council twelve years (1774-86); also a major-general of militia, and judge of the county court of common pleas and of probate. In 1775 Congress appointed him a commissioner of Indian affairs to secure the neutrality of the Six Nations, and he became a member of Congress in January, 1776. After the Declaration of Independence he returned to Connecticut, invested with the command of the militia intended for the defence of New York, and in November resumed his seat in Congress. Late in the summer of 1777 he joined the army under Gates with several hundred volunteers, and assisted in the capture of Burgoyne and his army. On the field of Saratoga he was made a brigadier-general in the Continental service. In 1786 he was ch
Wolcott, Oliver 1747-1797 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Windsor, Conn., Nov. 26, 172;; graduated at Yale College in 1747; began studying medicine, but on being appointed sheriff of Litchfield county, in 1751, he abandoned it. He was in the council twelve years (1774-86); also a major-general of militia, and judge of the county court of common pleas and of probate. In 1775 Congress appointed him a commissioner of Indian affairs to secure the neutrality of the Six Nations, and he became a member of Congress in January, 1776. After the Declaration of Independence he returned to Connecticut, invested with the command of the militia intended for the defence of New York, and in November resumed his seat in Congress. Late in the summer of 1777 he joined the army under Gates with several hundred volunteers, and assisted in the capture of Burgoyne and his army. On the field of Saratoga he was made a brigadier-general in the Continental service. In 1786 he was c
Sir John Burgoyne (search for this): entry wolcott-oliver
s and of probate. In 1775 Congress appointed him a commissioner of Indian affairs to secure the neutrality of the Six Nations, and he became a member of Congress in January, 1776. After the Declaration of Independence he returned to Connecticut, invested with the command of the militia intended for the defence of New York, and in November resumed his seat in Congress. Late in the summer of 1777 he joined the army under Gates with several hundred volunteers, and assisted in the capture of Burgoyne and his army. On the field of Saratoga he was made a brigadier-general in the Continental service. In 1786 he was chosen lieutenant-governor of Connecticut, and served in that capacity ten years, when he was elected governor. He died in Litchfield, Conn., Dec. 1, 1797. Financier; born in Litchfield, Conn., Jan. 11, 1760; a son of the preceding; graduated at Yale College in 1778, and was a volunteer to repel the British and Hessian marauders on the Connecticut coast towns in 1779. H
major-general of militia, and judge of the county court of common pleas and of probate. In 1775 Congress appointed him a commissioner of Indian affairs to secure the neutrality of the Six Nations, and he became a member of Congress in January, 1776. After the Declaration of Independence he returned to Connecticut, invested with the command of the militia intended for the defence of New York, and in November resumed his seat in Congress. Late in the summer of 1777 he joined the army under Gates with several hundred volunteers, and assisted in the capture of Burgoyne and his army. On the field of Saratoga he was made a brigadier-general in the Continental service. In 1786 he was chosen lieutenant-governor of Connecticut, and served in that capacity ten years, when he was elected governor. He died in Litchfield, Conn., Dec. 1, 1797. Financier; born in Litchfield, Conn., Jan. 11, 1760; a son of the preceding; graduated at Yale College in 1778, and was a volunteer to repel the
laration of Independence; born in Windsor, Conn., Nov. 26, 172;; graduated at Yale College in 1747; began studying medicine, but on being appointed sheriff of Litchfield county, in 1751, he abandoned it. He was in the council twelve years (1774-86); also a major-general of militia, and judge of the county court of common pleas and of probate. In 1775 Congress appointed him a commissioner of Indian affairs to secure the neutrality of the Six Nations, and he became a member of Congress in January, 1776. After the Declaration of Independence he returned to Connecticut, invested with the command of the militia intended for the defence of New York, and in November resumed his seat in Congress. Late in the summer of 1777 he joined the army under Gates with several hundred volunteers, and assisted in the capture of Burgoyne and his army. On the field of Saratoga he was made a brigadier-general in the Continental service. In 1786 he was chosen lieutenant-governor of Connecticut, and serv
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