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Beyond a few of our principal ports, whence our staple of cotton was shipped to Europe, our nomenclature even was unknown to the mass of mere traders. The Yankee Con the goods which were purchased with the proceeds. All the American trade with Europe was Yankee trade—a ship here and there excepted. Commercial men, everywhere, wtly the facts, and principles of the case; to wit: that the principal powers of Europe have recognized the Confederate States, as belligerents, in their war against tn nations. It cannot have escaped your observation, that the course pursued by Europe in that affair, is precisely analogous to that which I have requested of you. Iain, a neutral in that war; and instead of refraining from offering advice, all Europe made haste to volunteer it to both parties. The United States were told by Frae to the case. If Morocco adopts the status given to the Confederate States by Europe, she must remain neutral between the two belligerents, not undertaking to judge
Machias (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
umstances by which I was surrounded and embarrassed. Enclosed is a copy of my order to Midshipman Armstrong, and a list of the officers and men left on board the ship. A brief summary of the services of the Sumter, and of what became of her, may not be uninteresting to the reader, who has followed her thus far, in her wanderings. She cruised six months, leaving out the time during which she was blockaded in Gibraltar. She captured seventeen ships, as follows: the Golden Rocket, Cuba, Machias, Ben. Dunning, Albert Adams, Naiad, Louisa Kilham, West Wind, Abby Bradford, Joseph Maxwell, Joseph Parke, D. Trowbridge, Montmorency, Arcade, Vigilant, Eben Dodge, Neapolitan, and Investigator. It is impossible to estimate the damage done to the enemy's commerce. The property actually destroyed formed a very small proportion of it. The fact alone of the Sumter being upon the seas, during these six months, gave such an alarm to neutral and belligerent shippers, that the enemy's carrying-tr
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 26
in most of the Christian capitals, particularly in London. A formal call was made in the British Parliament,t it being rumored and believed, soon afterward, in London, that the prisoners had been released, no steps weril it was too late. Mr. Mason, our Commissioner in London, interested himself at once in the matter, but was gh there was a continuous line of telegraph between London and Gibraltar— I have had the honor to receivee to coal, I resolved to lay her up, and proceed to London, and consult with my Government as to my future cou I might possibly have had coal shipped to me from London, or some other English port, but this would have intful and proper to consult with our Commissioner in London, Mr. Mason, and to obtain his consent before finallcommand, as fast as paid off, and they embarked for London, on their way to another ship, or to the Confederatselves to the Department. I will myself proceed to London, and after conferring with Mr. Mason, make the best
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
hs, gave such an alarm to neutral and belligerent shippers, that the enemy's carrying-trade began to be paralyzed, and already his ships were being laid up, or sold under neutral flags—some of these sales being bona fide, and others fraudulent. In addition to this, the enemy kept five or six of his best ships of war constantly in pursuit of her, which necessarily weakened his blockade, for which, at this time, he was much pressed for ships. The expense to my Government of running the ship was next to nothing, being only $28,000, or about the price of one of the least valuable of her prizes. The Sumter was sold in the course of a month or two after being laid up, and being put under the English flag as a merchant-ship, made one voyage to the coast of the Confederate States, as a blockade-runner, entering the port of Charleston. Her new owner changed her name to that of Gibraltar. She was lost afterward in the North Sea, and her bones lie interred not far from those of the Alabama
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 26
a friendly manner, to prevent wars between nations. It cannot have escaped your observation, that the course pursued by Europe in that affair, is precisely analogous to that which I have requested of you. In that affair a quarrel arose between the United States, one of the belligerents in the existing war, and Great Britain, a neutral in that war; and instead of refraining from offering advice, all Europe made haste to volunteer it to both parties. The United States were told by France, by Russia, by Spain, and other Powers, that their act was illegal, and that they could, without a sacrifice of honor, grant the reparation demanded by Great Britain. Neither the nation giving the advice nor the nation advised, supposed for a moment that there was a breach of neutrality in this proceeding; on the contrary, it was the general verdict of mankind, that the course pursued was not only legal, but eminently humane and proper, as tending to allay excitement, and prevent the effusion of blood
Maroc (Morocco) (search for this): chapter 26
s! Upon demanding an explanation, they were informed that they had been arrested upon a requisition of the United States Consul, resident in that town. By special treaties between the Christian powers, and the Moorish and other non-Christian powers on the borders of the Mediterranean, it is provided that the consuls of the different Christian powers shall have jurisdiction, both civil and criminal, over their respective citizens. It was under such a treaty between the United States and Morocco, that the United States Consul had demanded the arrest of Messrs. Myers and Tunstall, as citizens of the United States, alleging that they had committed high crimes against the said States, on the high seas! The ignorant Moorish officials knew nothing, and cared nothing, about the laws of nations; nor did they puzzle their small brains with what was going on, on the American continent. All they knew was, that one Christian dog, had demanded other Christian dogs, as his prisoners, and troo
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 26
caped your observation, that the course pursued by Europe in that affair, is precisely analogous to that which I have requested of you. In that affair a quarrel arose between the United States, one of the belligerents in the existing war, and Great Britain, a neutral in that war; and instead of refraining from offering advice, all Europe made haste to volunteer it to both parties. The United States were told by France, by Russia, by Spain, and other Powers, that their act was illegal, and that they could, without a sacrifice of honor, grant the reparation demanded by Great Britain. Neither the nation giving the advice nor the nation advised, supposed for a moment that there was a breach of neutrality in this proceeding; on the contrary, it was the general verdict of mankind, that the course pursued was not only legal, but eminently humane and proper, as tending to allay excitement, and prevent the effusion of blood. If you will run a parallel between the Trent case, and the case
Fretum Gaditanum (search for this): chapter 26
of Gibraltar, to obtain a supply of coal, I next dispatched my paymaster for Cadiz, with instructions to purchase in that port, and ship the article around to me. A Mr. Tunstall, who had been the United States Consul at Cadiz, before the war, was then in Gibraltar, and at his request, I sent him along with the paymaster. They embarked on board a small French steamer plying between some of the Mediterranean ports, and Cadiz. Tangier, a small Moorish town on the opposite side of the Strait of Gibraltar, lies in the route, and the steamer stopped there for a few hours to land and receive passengers, and to put off, and take on freight. Messrs. Myers and Tunstall, during this delay, went up into the town, to take a walk, and as they were returning, were set upon by a guard of Moorish soldiers, and made prisoners! Upon demanding an explanation, they were informed that they had been arrested upon a requisition of the United States Consul, resident in that town. By special treaties
London, Madison County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
extensive to enable us to have a new set of boilers made. We were disappointed in this; and so were compelled to patch up the old boilers as best we could, hoping that when our funds should arrive, we might be enabled to coal, and run around to London or Liverpool, where we would find all the facilities we could desire. My funds arrived, as before stated, on the 3d of February, and I at once set about supplying myself with coal. I sent my first lieutenant and paymaster on shore, and afterwaragent, who can have no difficulty, I suppose, in purchasing the same quantity of the material from some of the coal-hulks, and returning it to her Majesty's dock-yard. This application was telegraphed to the Secretary for Foreign Affairs, in London, and after the lapse of a week—for it took the law-officers of the Crown a week, it seems, to decide the question—was denied. On the same day on which I wrote the above letter, I performed the very pleasant duty of paying to the Spanish Consul a
Tingis (Morocco) (search for this): chapter 26
to Cadiz they are arrested and imprisoned at Tangier correspondence on the subject the Sumter la some of the Mediterranean ports, and Cadiz. Tangier, a small Moorish town on the opposite side oprize which might make him Consul for life at Tangier? Alas for human hopes! I have since learnedailing bark Ino, one of his armed vessels, to Tangier, which received the prisoners on board, and bter gentleman, whose name was Hay, resided at Tangier, where the Court of Morocco then was, and wasz. The steamer having stopped on her way, at Tangier, and these gentlemen having gone on shore forGovernment has a diplomatic agent resident at Tangier, and a word from that gentleman would, no doued States, to be exercised by their Consul in Tangier. I trust that you will not understand, thathe reader will have full information of this Tangier difficulty. Myers and Tunstall had embarked,glish steam-frigate, on this station, visited Tangier, with his ship, a day or two only after the o[3 more...]
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