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Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
de-bound, weather-tanned Yankee skipper stood before me. Puritan, May-Flower, Plymouth Rock, were all written upon the well-known features. No amount of English custom-house paper, or sealing-wax could, by any possibility, convert him into that rotund, florid, jocund Briton who personates the English shipmaster. His speech was even more national—taking New England to be the Yankee nation —than his person; and when he opened his mouth, a mere novice might have sworn that he was from the State of Maine—there, or thereabouts. When he told me that I hadn't-ought-to burn his ship, he pronounced the shibboleth which condemned her to the flames. The shrift was a short one. When the papers were produced, I found among them no bill of sale or other evidence of the transfer of the property—the register of an English ship, as every seaman knows, not being such evidence. His crew list, which had been very neatly prepared, was a mute but powerful witness against him. It was written, throug
Philippines (Philippines) (search for this): chapter 50
seas, by vessels passing constantly through the Strait of Malacca, and touching at Singapore for orders or refreshments. There were two American ships laid up in Bankok, in Siam; one or two at Canton; two or three at Shanghai; one at the Phillippine Islands; and one or two more in Japanese waters. These, besides the twenty-two ships laid up in Singapore, comprised all of the enemy's once numerous Chinese fleet! No ship could get a freight, and the commerce of the enemy was as dead, for the y peninsula, with canes, gutta-percha, and India-rubber. In the bay are ships from all parts of the East—from China, with silks and teas; from Japan, with lacker-ware, raw silk, and curious manufactures of iron, steel, and paper; from the Phillippine Islands, with sugar, hides, tobacco, and spices. Intermixed with these are the European and American ships, with the products of their various countries. As a consequence, all the races and all the religions of the world were represented in the
France (France) (search for this): chapter 50
n half a century since Napoleon twitted the English people with being a nation of shop-keepers. So rapid have been the changes since, that other nations besides Great Britain are beginning to covet the designation as one of honor. Even military France, the very country which bestowed the epithet in scorn, is herself becoming a nation of mechanics and shop-keepers. Industrial Congresses, and Palaces of Industry attract more attention, in that once martial country, than military reviews, and the marching and countermarching of troops on the Campus Martius. An Emperor of France has bestowed the cordon of the Legion of Honor on a Yankee piano-maker! These are some of the signs of the times in which we live. And they are signs which the wise statesman will not ignore. A nation chooses wisely and well, which prefers the pursuits of peace to those of war; and that nation is to be envied, which is better constituted by the nature of its people for peaceful, than for warlike pursuits. T
East India (search for this): chapter 50
all being as like as two peas. After glancing at the papers, and making these mental observations as I went along, I asked the master a few questions. As well as I recollect, he was from Hallowell, Maine. His ship had been two years in the East Indies, trading from port to port; and, as before remarked, had only been transferred within a few days. The freshly painted assumed name on her stern was scarcely dry. The master had sat with comparative composure during this examination, and queste frank; was, or was not, the transfer of your ship a bona fide transaction? After a moment's reflection he replied:— I will be frank with you, captain. It was not a bona fide transaction. I was alarmed when I heard of your arrival in the. East Indies, and I resorted to a sham sale in the hope of saving my ship. Upon this answer being recorded the court adjourned. At a late hour in the night, the moon shining quite brightly, we ran in past some islands, and anchored off the little town
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
th the flaunting lie stowed away snugly in their cabins. They were monster ships, both of them, being eleven or twelve hundred tons burden. In their innocence—supposing the Alabama had gone up the China Sea—they had ventured, whilst lying at Singapore, to take charter-parties for cargoes of rice to be laden at Akyab, for Europe; and were now on their way to Akyab in ballast. They had left Singapore several days before our arrival there, and had been delayed by head-winds. Both were Massachusetts ships—one the Sonora of Newburyport, and the other, the Highlander of Boston. The master of one of these ships, when he was brought on board, came up to me good-humoredly on the quarter-deck, and offering me his hand, which I accepted, said: Well, Captain Semmes, I have been expecting every day for the last three years, to fall in with you, and here I am at last! I told him I was glad he had found me after so long a search. Search! said he; it is some such search as the Devil may be<
Bay of Bengal (search for this): chapter 50
dropping off in sheets. Her speed had, in consequence, been much diminished. The fire in her furnaces, like that of the fire-worshipping Persian, had never been permitted to go out, except for a few hours at rare intervals, to enable the engineer to clink his bars, and remove the incrustations of salt from the bottoms of his boilers. This constant action of fire and salt had nearly destroyed them. I resolved, therefore, to turn my ship's head westward from Singapore, run up into the Bay of Bengal, along the coast of Hindostan to Bombay, through the Seychelle Islands to the mouth of the Red Sea, thence to the Comoro Islands; from these latter to the Strait of Madagascar, and from the latter Strait to the Cape of Good Hope—thus varying my route back to the Cape. We were received with great cordiality by the people of Singapore, and, as at the Cape of Good Hope, much curiosity was manifested to see the ship. After she had hauled alongside of the coaling wharf, crowds gathered t
Bombay (Maharashtra, India) (search for this): chapter 50
consequence, been much diminished. The fire in her furnaces, like that of the fire-worshipping Persian, had never been permitted to go out, except for a few hours at rare intervals, to enable the engineer to clink his bars, and remove the incrustations of salt from the bottoms of his boilers. This constant action of fire and salt had nearly destroyed them. I resolved, therefore, to turn my ship's head westward from Singapore, run up into the Bay of Bengal, along the coast of Hindostan to Bombay, through the Seychelle Islands to the mouth of the Red Sea, thence to the Comoro Islands; from these latter to the Strait of Madagascar, and from the latter Strait to the Cape of Good Hope—thus varying my route back to the Cape. We were received with great cordiality by the people of Singapore, and, as at the Cape of Good Hope, much curiosity was manifested to see the ship. After she had hauled alongside of the coaling wharf, crowds gathered to look curiously upon her, and compare her a
Singapore (Singapore) (search for this): chapter 50
Chapter 50: The Alabama at Singapore panic among the enemy's shipping in the China serough the Strait of Malacca, and touching at Singapore for orders or refreshments. There were two ese, besides the twenty-two ships laid up in Singapore, comprised all of the enemy's once numerous ips, that were now anchored under my guns in Singapore, and disconsolate for want of something to d, from the remote East and the remote West. Singapore being a free port, and a great centre of traured goods with them, but not until then. Singapore is a miniature Canton, and the visitor, as hwith that of other nations. As a free port, Singapore is open to immigration from all parts of theeing laden with rice, and having cleared for Singapore —of which port, as the reader sees, she was heir way to Akyab in ballast. They had left Singapore several days before our arrival there, and hsion their own boats, and depart in them for Singapore. The ships when overhauled were lying just [13 more...]
Maulmain (Mon, Myanmar) (search for this): chapter 50
hman, on board to examine her papers. These were all in due form—were undoubtedly genuine, and had been signed by the proper custom-house officers. The register purported that the stranger was the British ship Martaban, belonging to parties in Maulmain, a rice port in India. Manifest and clearance corresponded with the register; the ship being laden with rice, and having cleared for Singapore —of which port, as the reader sees, she was within a few hours' sail. Thus far, all seemed regular a honest enough, but the ship was American—having been formerly known as the Texan Star—and her transfer to British owners, if made at all, had been made within the last ten days, after the arrival of the Alabama in these seas had become known at Maulmain. Mr. Fullam, regarding these circumstances as at least suspicious, requested the master of the ship to go on board the Alabama with him, that I might have an opportunity of inspecting his papers in person. This the master declined to do. I co
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
possession of all the business of the place Alabama leaves Singapore capture of the Martaban, Alias Texan Star Alabama touches at Malacca capture of the Highlander and Sonora Alabama once moreankee and Dutch rejoicings were going on, the Alabama was crossing the China Sea, from Borneo to Pueved, that we kept chained in the hold of the Alabama, several negro giants—they had heard somethint. The next morning, bright and early, the Alabama was under way, steaming through the Strait ofld pack their duds, and be transferred to the Alabama, the Texan Star-alias the Martaban—was in flas row, and the novelty of the presence of the Alabama seemed greatly to excite our new friends. Thoms of water. The only Christmas kept by the Alabama was the usual splicing of the main-brace by tons burden. In their innocence—supposing the Alabama had gone up the China Sea—they had ventured, tinued he, I have had constant visions of the Alabama, by night and by day; she has been chasing me[5 more.
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