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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 50
before, the unmistakable persons of these men would have removed them. In the person of the master, the long, lean, angular-featured, hide-bound, weather-tanned Yankee skipper stood before me. Puritan, May-Flower, Plymouth Rock, were all written upon the well-known features. No amount of English custom-house paper, or sealing-wax could, by any possibility, convert him into that rotund, florid, jocund Briton who personates the English shipmaster. His speech was even more national—taking New England to be the Yankee nation —than his person; and when he opened his mouth, a mere novice might have sworn that he was from the State of Maine—there, or thereabouts. When he told me that I hadn't-ought-to burn his ship, he pronounced the shibboleth which condemned her to the flames. The shrift was a short one. When the papers were produced, I found among them no bill of sale or other evidence of the transfer of the property—the register of an English ship, as every seaman knows, not bei
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 50
Spanish, Mexican, Peruvian, and Bolivian dollars are current. Great Britain, with an infinite forecaste, not only girdles the seas with herd be more suicidal. Colonization is as much of a necessity for Great Britain as it was for the Grecian States and for Rome, when they becameelves, but for each colony which thus puts on the toga virilis, Great Britain should establish another, if she would preserve her empire, ando rapid have been the changes since, that other nations besides Great Britain are beginning to covet the designation as one of honor. Even mible on his well mown lawns. His household—the lady was absent in England—was a pattern of neatness and comfort. His bath-rooms, bed-rooms,olate Yankees, for the destruction of his ship. When will naughty England pay that little bill? After a good day's run—during which we oveen fine ships belong has a Navy perhaps second only to that of Great Britain, and the enemy with which she has to cope, is but a schism from<
Sumatra (Indonesia) (search for this): chapter 50
he earth, from the remote East and the remote West. Singapore being a free port, and a great centre of trade, there is always a large fleet of shipping anchored in its waters, and its streets and other marts of commerce are constantly thronged with a promiscuous multitude. The canal—there being one leading to the rear of the town—is filled with country boats from the surrounding coasts, laden with the products of the different countries from which they come. There is the pepper-boat from Sumatra, and the coaster of larger size laden with tinore; the spice-boats from the spice islands; boats with tin-ore, hides, and mats from Borneo; boats from Siam, with gums, hides, and cotton; boats from different parts of the Malay peninsula, with canes, gutta-percha, and India-rubber. In the bay are ships from all parts of the East—from China, with silks and teas; from Japan, with lacker-ware, raw silk, and curious manufactures of iron, steel, and paper; from the Phillippine Islands, with suga<
Hallowell (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
her evidence of the transfer of the property—the register of an English ship, as every seaman knows, not being such evidence. His crew list, which had been very neatly prepared, was a mute but powerful witness against him. It was written, throughout, signatures and all in the same hand—the signatures all being as like as two peas. After glancing at the papers, and making these mental observations as I went along, I asked the master a few questions. As well as I recollect, he was from Hallowell, Maine. His ship had been two years in the East Indies, trading from port to port; and, as before remarked, had only been transferred within a few days. The freshly painted assumed name on her stern was scarcely dry. The master had sat with comparative composure during this examination, and questioning, evidently relying with great confidence upon his English flag and papers; but when I turned to him, and told him that I should burn his ship, he sprang from his chair, and said with excited m
e States on the Pacific coast, and silently, but surely, possessing themselves of all the avenues of industry in those States, thrusting aside the more expensive European and American laborers. They will cross the Rocky Mountains, and effect, in course of time, a similar revolution in the Western and Southern States. In the latt communication with the paymaster, and the next day rode out, and dined, and spent a night with him at his country-seat. He lived in luxurious style, as do most European merchants in the East. The drive out took us through the principal streets of the city, which I found to be laid out and built with great taste—the edifices havupposing the Alabama had gone up the China Sea—they had ventured, whilst lying at Singapore, to take charter-parties for cargoes of rice to be laden at Akyab, for Europe; and were now on their way to Akyab in ballast. They had left Singapore several days before our arrival there, and had been delayed by head-winds. Both were M
China (China) (search for this): chapter 50
e, comprised all of the enemy's once numerous Chinese fleet! No ship could get a freight, and the ld not venture out in a close sea like that of China, so long as I remained in it. After I should h bay are ships from all parts of the East—from China, with silks and teas; from Japan, with lacker-e most notable feature about Singapore is its Chinese population. I consider these people, in manyr view of these people. A few years back, and China was a sealed book to us. Our merchants were co extraordinary productiveness and vitality of Chinese commerce. We have been amazed whilst we havet no western nation can sell its goods in the Chinese market. We are all compelled to purchase whaiption is in the hands of the Chinese. Large Chinese houses monopolize the trade, and the Chinese he one hundred thousand of the population are Chinese. Now that the exclusiveness of China has bChina has been broken in upon, and emigration permitted, what a destiny awaits such a people in the workshops [1 more...]
Sonora (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
wed away snugly in their cabins. They were monster ships, both of them, being eleven or twelve hundred tons burden. In their innocence—supposing the Alabama had gone up the China Sea—they had ventured, whilst lying at Singapore, to take charter-parties for cargoes of rice to be laden at Akyab, for Europe; and were now on their way to Akyab in ballast. They had left Singapore several days before our arrival there, and had been delayed by head-winds. Both were Massachusetts ships—one the Sonora of Newburyport, and the other, the Highlander of Boston. The master of one of these ships, when he was brought on board, came up to me good-humoredly on the quarter-deck, and offering me his hand, which I accepted, said: Well, Captain Semmes, I have been expecting every day for the last three years, to fall in with you, and here I am at last! I told him I was glad he had found me after so long a search. Search! said he; it is some such search as the Devil may be supposed to make after h<
Plymouth Rock (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
t the gangway, and, after I had paused to take a glance at things on deck, I proceeded with him into his cabin, where his papers were to be examined. His mates were standing about the companion-way, anxious, of course, to know the fate of their ship. If I had had any doubts before, the unmistakable persons of these men would have removed them. In the person of the master, the long, lean, angular-featured, hide-bound, weather-tanned Yankee skipper stood before me. Puritan, May-Flower, Plymouth Rock, were all written upon the well-known features. No amount of English custom-house paper, or sealing-wax could, by any possibility, convert him into that rotund, florid, jocund Briton who personates the English shipmaster. His speech was even more national—taking New England to be the Yankee nation —than his person; and when he opened his mouth, a mere novice might have sworn that he was from the State of Maine—there, or thereabouts. When he told me that I hadn't-ought-to burn his ship<
Puritan (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): chapter 50
The master received me at the gangway, and, after I had paused to take a glance at things on deck, I proceeded with him into his cabin, where his papers were to be examined. His mates were standing about the companion-way, anxious, of course, to know the fate of their ship. If I had had any doubts before, the unmistakable persons of these men would have removed them. In the person of the master, the long, lean, angular-featured, hide-bound, weather-tanned Yankee skipper stood before me. Puritan, May-Flower, Plymouth Rock, were all written upon the well-known features. No amount of English custom-house paper, or sealing-wax could, by any possibility, convert him into that rotund, florid, jocund Briton who personates the English shipmaster. His speech was even more national—taking New England to be the Yankee nation —than his person; and when he opened his mouth, a mere novice might have sworn that he was from the State of Maine—there, or thereabouts. When he told me that I hadn'<
Malacca (Melaka, Malaysia) (search for this): chapter 50
pends a night the Chinese in possession of all the business of the place Alabama leaves Singapore capture of the Martaban, Alias Texan Star Alabama touches at Malacca capture of the Highlander and Sonora Alabama once more in the Indian Ocean. It turned out as I had conjectured in the last chapter. The Wyoming had been at ng recorded the court adjourned. At a late hour in the night, the moon shining quite brightly, we ran in past some islands, and anchored off the little town of Malacca—formerly a Portuguese settlement, but now, like Singapore, in the possession of the English. My object was to land my prisoners, and at early dawn we dispatched They left us after a short visit, and at half-past 9 A. M., our boats having returned, we were again under steam. Bartelli was seen lugging a basketfull of fine Malacca oranges into the cabin, soon after the return of our boats—a gift from some of our lady friends who had visited us. I have observed by Mr. Seward's little bil
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