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l 26th, makes inquiry about a report that had got afloat there that three regiments of troops had left North Carolina to join Lincoln. What an idea! When North Carolina troops join old Abe it will be at the point of the bayonet, and he at the sharp end. When North Carolina regiments go to Washington, and they will go, they will stand side by side with their brethren of the South. What fool could have put in circulation such a report! From the Milledgeville (Ga.) Southern Recorder, of April 30. The government of the Confederate States must possess the city of Washington. It is folly to think it can be used any longer as the headquarters of the Lincoln Government, as no access can be had to it except by passing through Virginia and Maryland. The District of Columbia cannot remain under the jurisdiction of the United States Congress without humiliating Southern pride and defeating Southern rights. Both are essential to greatness of character, and both must cooperate in the des
ation. From the Eufaula (Ala.) Express, of April 25. With independent Virginia on one side and the secessionists of Maryland (who are doubtless in the majority) on the other, our policy at this time should be to seize the old Federal Capital and take old Lincoln and his Cabinet prisoners of war. Once get the Heads of the Government in our power, and we can demand any terms we see fit, and thus, perhaps, avoid a long and bloody contest. From the Wilmington (N. C.) Daily Journal of April 27. A correspondent writing from Georgetown, (S. C.) under date of April 26th, makes inquiry about a report that had got afloat there that three regiments of troops had left North Carolina to join Lincoln. What an idea! When North Carolina troops join old Abe it will be at the point of the bayonet, and he at the sharp end. When North Carolina regiments go to Washington, and they will go, they will stand side by side with their brethren of the South. What fool could have put in circulatio
Doc. 134.--the attack on Washington. On the 12th of April last the honorable Mr. Walker, Secretary of War of the Confederate States, held the following language at Montgomery, Alabama: No man, he said, could tell where the war this day commenced would end, but he would prophesy that the flag which now flaunts the breeze here would float over the dome of the old Capitol at Washington before the first of May. Let them try Southern chivalry and test the extent of Southern resources, and it might float eventually over Faneuil Hall itself. Such being the publicly avowed belief of the Secretary of War of the Confederate States, we quote in illustration of similar threats, the following excerpts taken from leading Southern journals, merely premising that we could greatly add to their number if it were essential to the purpose: From the Richmond Enquirer, of April 13. attention, volunteers!--Nothing is more probable than that President Davis will soon march an army throu
Washington before the first of May. Let them try Southern chivalry and test the extent of Southern resources, and it might float eventually over Faneuil Hall itself. Such being the publicly avowed belief of the Secretary of War of the Confederate States, we quote in illustration of similar threats, the following excerpts taken from leading Southern journals, merely premising that we could greatly add to their number if it were essential to the purpose: From the Richmond Enquirer, of April 13. attention, volunteers!--Nothing is more probable than that President Davis will soon march an army through North Carolina and Virginia to Washington. Those of our volunteers who desire to join the Southern army as it shall pass through our borders, had better organize at once for the purpose, and keep their arms, accoutrements, uniforms, ammunition, and knapsacks in constant readiness. From the New Orleans Picayune, of April 18. The first fruits of a Virginia secession will be th
Doc. 134.--the attack on Washington. On the 12th of April last the honorable Mr. Walker, Secretary of War of the Confederate States, held the following language at Montgomery, Alabama: No man, he said, could tell where the war this day commenced would end, but he would prophesy that the flag which now flaunts the breeze here would float over the dome of the old Capitol at Washington before the first of May. Let them try Southern chivalry and test the extent of Southern resources, and it might float eventually over Faneuil Hall itself. Such being the publicly avowed belief of the Secretary of War of the Confederate States, we quote in illustration of similar threats, the following excerpts taken from leading Southern journals, merely premising that we could greatly add to their number if it were essential to the purpose: From the Richmond Enquirer, of April 13. attention, volunteers!--Nothing is more probable than that President Davis will soon march an army thro
Exchange Hotel, and from the vast crowd which assembled, repeated cheers were given for the loyal people of Baltimore. Hon. Roger A. Pryor, of Virginia, had arrived in the city in the afternoon, and as soon as it was known, there were loud calls for him. His reception was most enthusiastic. and some minutes elapsed before he could commence his remarks. He made a brief but very eloquent address, full of spirit. He is in favor of marching immediately on Washington, and so stated, to which the crowd responded in deafening and prolonged cheers. At the flag presentation which preceded the departure of the second regiment of South Carolina for Richmond, the following remarks were made by Colonel Kershaw on taking the colors: Sergeant Gordon, to your particular charge is committed this noble gift. Plant it wherever honor calls. If opportunity offers, let it be the first to kiss the breeze of heaven from the dome of the capitol at Washington. --National Intelligencer, May 9.
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