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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 143
rts to keep the peace in the trying situation in which you are placed. For the future, troops must be brought here, but I make no point of bringing them through Baltimore. Without any military knowledge myself, of course I must leave details to General Scott. Ho hastily said this morning, in presence of these gentlemen, March them around Baltimore, and not through it. I sincerely hope the general, on fuller reflection, will consider this practical and proper, and that you will not object to it. By this a collision of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influencen of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influence to prevent this. Now and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, consistently with the maintenance of Government. Your obedient servant, A. Lincoln. --N. Y. Evening Post, May 6.
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 143
Doc. 138.-President Lincoln's letter to the Maryland authorities. Washington, April 20, 1861. Governor Hicks and Mayor Brown: Gentlemen: Your letter by Messrs. Bond, Dobbin and Brune, is received. I tender you both my sincere thanks for your efforts to keep the peace in the trying situation in which you are placed. For the future, troops must be brought here, but I make no point of bringing them through Baltimore. Without any military knowledge myself, of course I must leave detnot through it. I sincerely hope the general, on fuller reflection, will consider this practical and proper, and that you will not object to it. By this a collision of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influence to prevent this. Now and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, consistently with the maintenance of Government. Your obedient servant, A. Lincoln. --N. Y. Evening Post, May 6.
George William Brown (search for this): chapter 143
Doc. 138.-President Lincoln's letter to the Maryland authorities. Washington, April 20, 1861. Governor Hicks and Mayor Brown: Gentlemen: Your letter by Messrs. Bond, Dobbin and Brune, is received. I tender you both my sincere thanks for your efforts to keep the peace in the trying situation in which you are placed. For the future, troops must be brought here, but I make no point of bringing them through Baltimore. Without any military knowledge myself, of course I must leave details to General Scott. Ho hastily said this morning, in presence of these gentlemen, March them around Baltimore, and not through it. I sincerely hope the general, on fuller reflection, will consider this practical and proper, and that you will not object to it. By this a collision of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influence to prevent this. Now and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, cons
resident Lincoln's letter to the Maryland authorities. Washington, April 20, 1861. Governor Hicks and Mayor Brown: Gentlemen: Your letter by Messrs. Bond, Dobbin and Brune, is received. I tender you both my sincere thanks for your efforts to keep the peace in the trying situation in which you are placed. For the future, troops must be brought here, but I make no point of bringing them through Baltimore. Without any military knowledge myself, of course I must leave details to General Scott. Ho hastily said this morning, in presence of these gentlemen, March them around Baltimore, and not through it. I sincerely hope the general, on fuller reflection, will consider this practical and proper, and that you will not object to it. By this a collision of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influence to prevent this. Now and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, consistently with
H. Lenox Bond (search for this): chapter 143
Doc. 138.-President Lincoln's letter to the Maryland authorities. Washington, April 20, 1861. Governor Hicks and Mayor Brown: Gentlemen: Your letter by Messrs. Bond, Dobbin and Brune, is received. I tender you both my sincere thanks for your efforts to keep the peace in the trying situation in which you are placed. For the future, troops must be brought here, but I make no point of bringing them through Baltimore. Without any military knowledge myself, of course I must leave details to General Scott. Ho hastily said this morning, in presence of these gentlemen, March them around Baltimore, and not through it. I sincerely hope the general, on fuller reflection, will consider this practical and proper, and that you will not object to it. By this a collision of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influence to prevent this. Now and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, consi
Thomas Halliday Hicks (search for this): chapter 143
Doc. 138.-President Lincoln's letter to the Maryland authorities. Washington, April 20, 1861. Governor Hicks and Mayor Brown: Gentlemen: Your letter by Messrs. Bond, Dobbin and Brune, is received. I tender you both my sincere thanks for your efforts to keep the peace in the trying situation in which you are placed. For the future, troops must be brought here, but I make no point of bringing them through Baltimore. Without any military knowledge myself, of course I must leave details to General Scott. Ho hastily said this morning, in presence of these gentlemen, March them around Baltimore, and not through it. I sincerely hope the general, on fuller reflection, will consider this practical and proper, and that you will not object to it. By this a collision of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influence to prevent this. Now and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, consi
Doc. 138.-President Lincoln's letter to the Maryland authorities. Washington, April 20, 1861. Governor Hicks and Mayor Brown: Gentlemen: Your letter by Messrs. Bond, Dobbin and Brune, is received. I tender you both my sincere thanks for your efforts to keep the peace in the trying situation in which you are placed. For the future, troops must be brought here, but I make no point of bringing them through Baltimore. Without any military knowledge myself, of course I must leave details to General Scott. Ho hastily said this morning, in presence of these gentlemen, March them around Baltimore, and not through it. I sincerely hope the general, on fuller reflection, will consider this practical and proper, and that you will not object to it. By this a collision of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influence to prevent this. Now and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, cons
John C. Brune (search for this): chapter 143
Doc. 138.-President Lincoln's letter to the Maryland authorities. Washington, April 20, 1861. Governor Hicks and Mayor Brown: Gentlemen: Your letter by Messrs. Bond, Dobbin and Brune, is received. I tender you both my sincere thanks for your efforts to keep the peace in the trying situation in which you are placed. For the future, troops must be brought here, but I make no point of bringing them through Baltimore. Without any military knowledge myself, of course I must leave details to General Scott. Ho hastily said this morning, in presence of these gentlemen, March them around Baltimore, and not through it. I sincerely hope the general, on fuller reflection, will consider this practical and proper, and that you will not object to it. By this a collision of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influence to prevent this. Now and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, cons
George W. Dobbin (search for this): chapter 143
Doc. 138.-President Lincoln's letter to the Maryland authorities. Washington, April 20, 1861. Governor Hicks and Mayor Brown: Gentlemen: Your letter by Messrs. Bond, Dobbin and Brune, is received. I tender you both my sincere thanks for your efforts to keep the peace in the trying situation in which you are placed. For the future, troops must be brought here, but I make no point of bringing them through Baltimore. Without any military knowledge myself, of course I must leave details to General Scott. Ho hastily said this morning, in presence of these gentlemen, March them around Baltimore, and not through it. I sincerely hope the general, on fuller reflection, will consider this practical and proper, and that you will not object to it. By this a collision of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influence to prevent this. Now and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, consi
nd Mayor Brown: Gentlemen: Your letter by Messrs. Bond, Dobbin and Brune, is received. I tender you both my sincere thanks for your efforts to keep the peace in the trying situation in which you are placed. For the future, troops must be brought here, but I make no point of bringing them through Baltimore. Without any military knowledge myself, of course I must leave details to General Scott. Ho hastily said this morning, in presence of these gentlemen, March them around Baltimore, and not through it. I sincerely hope the general, on fuller reflection, will consider this practical and proper, and that you will not object to it. By this a collision of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influence to prevent this. Now and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, consistently with the maintenance of Government. Your obedient servant, A. Lincoln. --N. Y. Evening Post, May 6.
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