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Doc. 195.-the March into Virginia. Friday, May 24. Thursday night was a stirring one. Through the day and evening the reports of contemplated military movements kept the people on the qui vive, to which excitement fresh fuel was added on its being whispered that various regiments had been ordered to prepare for immediate service; the words dropped also by Gen. Thomas at the Seventh Regiment camp, to the effect that the storm was about to burst, indicated that a decisive move was to be taken. The general idea among the troops was that an advance was to be made into Virginia, but nobody seemed to be advised as to the exact purposes entertained at Headquarters. At 11 o'clock we pushed off for the Long Bridge to see what was developing thereabouts. We found the vigilant sentries of the Washington Light Infantry (company A) posted some distance up Maryland avenue, and a portion of the same company somewhat lower down. A squad of the Infantry had also been detailed to a po
M. W. Ransom (search for this): chapter 209
ing, at two o'clock, in pursuance of orders previously given, a large body of United States troops crossed the Potomac from Washington and its neighborhood into Virginia. Ellsworth's Zouaves, in two steamers, with the steamer James Guy as accompanying tender, left their camp on the Eastern Branch and made directly for Alexandria by water. The Michigan Regiment, under Col. Wilcox, accompanied by a detachment of United States cavalry, and two pieces of Sherman's battery, under command of Lieut. Ransom, proceeded by way of the Long Bridge directly for Alexandria. The Seventh New York Regiment halted under orders at Hughes' tavern, at the Virginia end of the Long Bridge; the Second New Jersey Regiment is at Roach's Spring, half a mile from the end of the bridge; the New York Twenty-fifth, and one cavalry company, and the New York Twelfth, and the Third and Fourth New Jersey Regiments proceeded to the right, after crossing the bridge, for the occupation of the Heights of Arlington. T
n half dressed. We at once turned to descend, Private Brownell leading the way, and Colonel Ellsworth immediately following him with the flag. As Brownell reached the first landing-place, or entry, after a descent of sble-barrelled gun square at the Colonel's breast. Brownell made a quick pass to turn the weapon aside, but th flash to give the contents of the other barrel to Brownell, but either he could not command his aim or the Zoond shot, and sounding like the echo of the first, Brownell's rifle was heard and the assassin staggered backwas the most frightful I ever witnessed. Of course Brownell did not know how fatal his shot had been, and so bgether, and one was without a weapon of any kind. Brownell instantly reloaded, and while doing so perceived tch I had believed lie uttered. It might have been Brownell, or the Chaplain, who was close behind me. Winser uld not ensue once in a thousand times. Either of Brownell's onslaughts would have been instantaneously fatal
that it was the duty of the Federal Government to repossess itself of the forts and arsenals in the seceded States, has been put forward to justify the aggressive movements of Federal troops. But in the present case there is no such pretence; no forts, or arsenals, or other Federal property have been seized at Alexandria. The bloody and brutal purposes of the Abolitionists, to subjugate and exterminate the Southern people, stands confessed by this flagrant outrage upon Virginia soil. Virginians, arise in your strength and welcome the invader with bloody hands to hospitable graves. The sacred soil of Virginia, in which repose the ashes of so many of the illustrious patriots who gave independence to their country, has been desecrated by the hostile tread of an armed enemy, who proclaims his malignant hatred of Virginia because she will not bow her proud neck to the humiliating yoke of Yankee rule. Meet the invader at the threshold. Welcome him with bayonet and bullet. Swear ete
Alfred Powell (search for this): chapter 209
any, a United States cavalry company, a company of United States artillery, (two pieces,) the Putnam Rifles, the Turner Rifles, National Rifles, Metropolitan Rifles, and company F, Union Volunteers; while company E, Washington Light Infantry, (Capt. Powell's Zouaves,) and the Constitutional Guards, occupied the Virginia end of the bridge. A full moon looked peacefully down, and perfect quiet reigned on all the neighboring shores. But this was to give place very speedily to more stirring movements. Somewhat after midnight Capt. Smead's company, the National Rifles, and Capt. Powell's company were advanced across the bridge to the neighborhood of Roach's Spring. Scouts were sent out in all directions, who managed to get past the line of the Virginia pickets. Somewhat later the Virginia pickets, getting the alarm, set spurs to their horses and made off down the road towards Alexandria in hot haste. The Constitutional Guards, Capt. Digges, about eighty strong, were on duty over t
he last moments he passed alone were given to them. For more than an hour the encampment was silent. Then it began to stir again, and presently was all alive with action. At 2 o'clock, steamboats appeared off the shore, from one of which Capt. Dahlgren, the commander of the Navy Yard, came to announce that all was ready for the transportation. The men marched forward in line, and were drawn up by companies to the beach. At this time, the scene was animated in the highest degree. The vivi Zouaves and the 71st New York Regiment (a small number of whom, I neglected to state, embarked in the morning at the Navy Yard, and came down with us) to the steamboat, by which it was brought to the Navy Yard. It now remains in the care of Capt. Dahlgren. Washington is greatly excited over the strange news, and there seems to be much doubt among the citizens as to what has really been accomplished. I am as yet ignorant of the movements of other troops sent to occupy the place, but there c
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 209
ed by the Washington tyrants a portion of the District of Columbia, and as she gave, in the very face of the Federal army, an overwhelming majority for Secession, Lincoln has sent his troops there to develop and protect a Union sentiment. Do these besotted fanatics flatter themselves that Alexandria is to be kept in chains like ghting on their own soil for all that is dear to man.--Richmond Enquirer. Virginia is invaded. That horde of thieves, robbers, and assassins in the pay of Abraham Lincoln, commonly known as the army of the United States, have rushed into the peaceful streets of a quiet city of the State, and stained the hearth of Virginia homestrategic reason) without a picket guard, and no attempt has ever been made to blow up or batter down the bridge across the Potomac River, over which the troops of Lincoln marched to it. One trait of true heroism has signalized this unhappy affair. A citizen of Alexandria, named Jackson, lacked the prudence to haul down the flag
Doc. 195.-the March into Virginia. Friday, May 24. Thursday night was a stirring one. Through the day and evening the reports of contemplated military movements kept the people on the qui vive, to which excitement fresh fuel was added on its being whispered that various regiments had been ordered to prepare for immediate service; the words dropped also by Gen. Thomas at the Seventh Regiment camp, to the effect that the storm was about to burst, indicated that a decisive move was to be taken. The general idea among the troops was that an advance was to be made into Virginia, but nobody seemed to be advised as to the exact purposes entertained at Headquarters. At 11 o'clock we pushed off for the Long Bridge to see what was developing thereabouts. We found the vigilant sentries of the Washington Light Infantry (company A) posted some distance up Maryland avenue, and a portion of the same company somewhat lower down. A squad of the Infantry had also been detailed to a po
easure which he appeared to regard as very seriously important. He was accompanied by Mr. II. J. Winser, Military Secretary to the Regiment, the Chaplain, the Rev. E. W. Dodge, and myself. At firsthe topmost story, whence, by means of a ladder, he clambered to the roof, cut down the flag with Winser's knife, and brought it from its staff. There were two men in bed in the garret whom we had notsection of the second flight of stairs, at the foot of which he lay with his face to the floor. Winser ran from above crying, Who is hit? but as he glanced downward by our feet, he needed no answer.ad believed lie uttered. It might have been Brownell, or the Chaplain, who was close behind me. Winser and I lifted the body with all the care we could apply, and laid it upon a bed in a room near byusband that had been shot. He was the proprietor of the hotel. His name was James T. Jackson. Winser was confident it was the same man who met us at the door when we entered, and told us he was a b
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 209
he Northern portion of the State. This movement, if successful, completely breaks the lines of the rebels, isolates Harper's Ferry from the base of their operations, and involves either the dispersion or capture of the forces at that point. We also learn that a body of Ohio troops is moving from Wheeling by way of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad upon the same point. We had no intelligence yesterday from Fort Monroe, but it is probable that the troops concentrated at that fortress under Gen. Butler, have moved in the direction of Richmond, so that every important point on the enemy's lines will, at the same instant, be either threatened or attacked. We could not wish for a more favorable opening of the campaign. We desire to see all the secession forces upon the soil of Virginia. The rebellion is brought within reach of the most effective blows we can deal. We can move our forces into that State in one-fourth of the time, and at one-fourth of the expense at which the secession
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