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Walter Scott (search for this): chapter 209
our detestable enemy is founded in wisdom. But when that day comes, it will be a new day in the history of nations, and one which will prove that we deserved to be conquered. It has been given out repeatedly of late by the Lincoln press, that Gen. Scott desired to delay an advance till cool weather, and till his army was fully organized. But they could not brook the whole delay recommended by the only General in their ranks that deserves the name, and the Republican, papers at Washington pronounced Scott behind the times. They will discover before long that it would have been well for them to take his counsel. They disregarded his advice once before in their attempt to reinforce Fort Sumter, and they will find a worse result from their present contempt of his military experience and judgment. This ferocious and vile attempt to subjugate Virginia will be crushed at very point where it is made, and there is not a man in the Commonwealth who does not rejoice that it is made now, wh
James T. Jackson (search for this): chapter 209
he Potomac River, over which the troops of Lincoln marched to it. One trait of true heroism has signalized this unhappy affair. A citizen of Alexandria, named Jackson, lacked the prudence to haul down the flag of his country, which streamed over his dwelling. That band of execrable cut-throats and jail-birds, known as the Zoualess of our presence, and yielded only to her own frantic despair. It was her husband that had been shot. He was the proprietor of the hotel. His name was James T. Jackson. Winser was confident it was the same man who met us at the door when we entered, and told us he was a boarder. His wife, as I said, was wild almost to insusand times. Either of Brownell's onslaughts would have been instantaneously fatal. The saber-wound was not less effective than that of the ball. The gun which Jackson had fired lay beneath him, clasped in his arms, and as we did not at first all know that both barrels had been discharged, it was thought necessary to remove it,
a company of United States artillery, (two pieces,) the Putnam Rifles, the Turner Rifles, National Rifles, Metropolitan Rifles, and company F, Union Volunteers; while company E, Washington Light Infantry, (Capt. Powell's Zouaves,) and the Constitutional Guards, occupied the Virginia end of the bridge. A full moon looked peacefully down, and perfect quiet reigned on all the neighboring shores. But this was to give place very speedily to more stirring movements. Somewhat after midnight Capt. Smead's company, the National Rifles, and Capt. Powell's company were advanced across the bridge to the neighborhood of Roach's Spring. Scouts were sent out in all directions, who managed to get past the line of the Virginia pickets. Somewhat later the Virginia pickets, getting the alarm, set spurs to their horses and made off down the road towards Alexandria in hot haste. The Constitutional Guards, Capt. Digges, about eighty strong, were on duty over the bridge. Col. Stone, of the Distri
ington and its neighborhood into Virginia. Ellsworth's Zouaves, in two steamers, with the steamer James Guy as accompanying tender, left their camp on the Eastern Branch and made directly for Alexandria by water. The Michigan Regiment, under Col. Wilcox, accompanied by a detachment of United States cavalry, and two pieces of Sherman's battery, under command of Lieut. Ransom, proceeded by way of the Long Bridge directly for Alexandria. The Seventh New York Regiment halted under orders at Hughes' tavern, at the Virginia end of the Long Bridge; the Second New Jersey Regiment is at Roach's Spring, half a mile from the end of the bridge; the New York Twenty-fifth, and one cavalry company, and the New York Twelfth, and the Third and Fourth New Jersey Regiments proceeded to the right, after crossing the bridge, for the occupation of the Heights of Arlington. They were joined by other troops which crossed at the Georgetown Aqueduct. At four o'clock, A. M., at about the same moment, th
E. W. Dodge (search for this): chapter 209
, that a town half waked, half terrified, and under truce, could harbor any peril for us. So the Colonel gave some rapid directions for the interruption of the railway course, by displacing a few rails near the depot, and then turned toward the centre of the town, to destroy the means of communication southward by the telegraph; a measure which he appeared to regard as very seriously important. He was accompanied by Mr. II. J. Winser, Military Secretary to the Regiment, the Chaplain, the Rev. E. W. Dodge, and myself. At first he summoned no guard to follow him, but he afterward turned and called forward a single squad, with a sergeant from the first company. We passed quickly through the streets, meeting a few bewildered travellers issuing from the principal hotel, which seemed to be slowly coming to its daily senses, and were about to turn toward the telegraph office, when the Colonel, first of all, caught sight of the secession flag, which has so long swung insolently in full view
John H. Wilcox (search for this): chapter 209
ith the steamer James Guy as accompanying tender, left their camp on the Eastern Branch and made directly for Alexandria by water. The Michigan Regiment, under Col. Wilcox, accompanied by a detachment of United States cavalry, and two pieces of Sherman's battery, under command of Lieut. Ransom, proceeded by way of the Long Bridge s taken of that part of Alexandria in the name of the United States, by the portion of the troops immediately commanded by Col. Ellsworth. Those commanded by Col. Wilcox, at about the same moment, as explained above, marched into the town by the extension of the Washington turnpike, the cavalry and artillery marching in two or tlexandria, and four pieces turning off to the right, Arlington way. At noon to-day Rickett's Light Artillery (six pieces) also went over the river from here. Col. Wilcox, of the Michigan Regiment, is now in command at Alexandria. The citizens of Alexandria appeared terrified. Many of the Union men shouted for joy at the succ
E. E. Ellsworth (search for this): chapter 209
hington and its neighborhood into Virginia. Ellsworth's Zouaves, in two steamers, with the steamermers bearing them. Immediately on landing Col. Ellsworth marched the Zouaves up into the centre of ion of the troops immediately commanded by Col. Ellsworth. Those commanded by Col. Wilcox, at abo under the chief of all scoundrels, called Col. Ellsworth, surrounded the house of this Virginian, aion.--Richmond Dispatch. Assassination of Ellsworth. The special correspondent of the N. Y. TI moved was that under command of the late Col. Ellsworth. His regiment of Zouaves was certainly thtainly did not enter our minds then, as poor Ellsworth's fate has since taught us it should have dod, Private Brownell leading the way, and Colonel Ellsworth immediately following him with the flag. wish to fasten obloquy upon the slayer of Col. Ellsworth, but simply because it struck me as a frigon made arrangements for the conveyance of Col. Ellsworth's body to Washington. It was properly vei[5 more...]
e United States, by the portion of the troops immediately commanded by Col. Ellsworth. Those commanded by Col. Wilcox, at about the same moment, as explained above, marched into the town by the extension of the Washington turnpike, the cavalry and artillery marching in two or three streets below. The destination of both these detachments was the depot of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, which they instantly seized. They also found near by a disunion company of cavalry, commanded by Capt. Ball, (thirty-five men and as many horses,) who were made prisoners, not having heard the alarm made by the firing of the sentries below. Every thing found in the depot, in the way of rolling stock, etc., is, of course, in the hands of the Government troops holding it. A number of secession officers were captured in the Marshall House. They are held as prisoners. At four o'clock in the morning, a number of Government wagons went across the Long Bridge loaded with picks, shovels, and a
Watts Sherman (search for this): chapter 209
ith the steamer James Guy as accompanying tender, left their camp on the Eastern Branch and made directly for Alexandria by water. The Michigan Regiment, under Col. Wilcox, accompanied by a detachment of United States cavalry, and two pieces of Sherman's battery, under command of Lieut. Ransom, proceeded by way of the Long Bridge directly for Alexandria. The Seventh New York Regiment halted under orders at Hughes' tavern, at the Virginia end of the Long Bridge; the Second New Jersey Regimenll manner of tools of that description, and accompanied by a full corps of carpenters and workmen. The United States forces are now busily engaged in throwing up fortifications on the heights of the Virginia bank of the Potomac. The whole of Sherman's battery (six pieces) crossed the Long Bridge in the advance during the night, two pieces going to Alexandria, and four pieces turning off to the right, Arlington way. At noon to-day Rickett's Light Artillery (six pieces) also went over the riv
Doc. 195.-the March into Virginia. Friday, May 24. Thursday night was a stirring one. Through the day and evening the reports of contemplated military movements kept the people on the qui vive, to which excitement fresh fuel was added on its being whispered that various regiments had been ordered to prepare for immediate service; the words dropped also by Gen. Thomas at the Seventh Regiment camp, to the effect that the storm was about to burst, indicated that a decisive move was to be taken. The general idea among the troops was that an advance was to be made into Virginia, but nobody seemed to be advised as to the exact purposes entertained at Headquarters. At 11 o'clock we pushed off for the Long Bridge to see what was developing thereabouts. We found the vigilant sentries of the Washington Light Infantry (company A) posted some distance up Maryland avenue, and a portion of the same company somewhat lower down. A squad of the Infantry had also been detailed to a po
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