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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
of the Ohio within ten days thereafter. On the other hand, should our forces in Tennessee and Southern Kentucky be strengthened so as to enable us to take and to hold the Ohio River as a boundary, a disastrous defeat of this army would at once be followed by an overwhelming wave of Northern invaders, that would sweep over Kentucky and Tennessee, extending to the northern part of the Cotton States, if not to New Orleans. Similar views were expressed in regard to ultimate results, in Northwestern Virginia, being dependent upon the success or failure of this army; and various other special illustrations were offered—showing, in short, that success here was success everywhere; defeat here, defeat everywhere; and that this was the point upon which all the available force of the Confederate States should be concentrated. It seemed to be conceded by all that our force, at that time here, was not sufficient for assuming the offensive beyond the Potomac; and that, even with a much larger
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
want of adequate strength on our part in Kentucky, the Federal forces should take military possession of that whole State, and even enter and occupy a portion of Tennessee, that a victory gained by this army beyond the Potomac would, by threatening the heart of the Northern States, compel their armies to fall back, free Kentucky, and give us the line of the Ohio within ten days thereafter. On the other hand, should our forces in Tennessee and Southern Kentucky be strengthened so as to enable us to take and to hold the Ohio River as a boundary, a disastrous defeat of this army would at once be followed by an overwhelming wave of Northern invaders, that would sweep over Kentucky and Tennessee, extending to the northern part of the Cotton States, if not to New Orleans. Similar views were expressed in regard to ultimate results, in Northwestern Virginia, being dependent upon the success or failure of this army; and various other special illustrations were offered—showing, in short, that
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
bide by its text, as recorded at the time. And to show how completely Mr. Davis errs, when he charges that he was kept purposely in ignorance of the secret report he so bitterly denounces, we here state that it was seen of many men during the war—and not as a secret; and that, as early as 1867 or 1868—in other words, fully fifteen or sixteen years ago—General Beauregard had this identical memorandum published in The Land We Love—a magazine edited, at that time, by General D. H. Hill, of North Carolina. It was commented on at length, if not republished, in the Jackson (Miss.) Clarion. No one is responsible for Mr. Davis's neglect to take cognizance of it. His appeal, therefore, to the honorable men of the country, whose sympathies he desires to enlist in his favor, becomes simply puerile; and, far from resulting in injury to those whom he assails, it only recoils upon himself, and exposes the extreme carelessness with which he writes. Mr. Davis should have inserted that document
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
to the safety of Washington; then troops could cross into Maryland, should the enemy move in a large force from Washington tbe at once neutralized by a bold movement from above into Maryland and on the rear of Washington. He was willing, besides, en, to exchange Richmond, temporarily, for Washington and Maryland. As to a general action, he desired it, for the reason tortified. McClellan's army thus placed at our mercy, and Maryland won, the theatre of war was to be transferred to the Nortll a compromise, being thus settled, the plan of invading Maryland was earnestly supported by the three senior generals. Mr.t up the force required for the contemplated advance into Maryland to eighty thousand men and no less. This assertion showsit was proposed to them? by Mr. Davis, to cross into eastern Maryland, on a steamer in our possession, for a partial campai brigade, but, at least, a division —thus to be sent into Maryland, would, of necessity, have had to return to the Virginia
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
as an illustration of this, the unqualified opinion was advanced, that if, for want of adequate strength on our part in Kentucky, the Federal forces should take military possession of that whole State, and even enter and occupy a portion of Tennesses army beyond the Potomac would, by threatening the heart of the Northern States, compel their armies to fall back, free Kentucky, and give us the line of the Ohio within ten days thereafter. On the other hand, should our forces in Tennessee and SouSouthern Kentucky be strengthened so as to enable us to take and to hold the Ohio River as a boundary, a disastrous defeat of this army would at once be followed by an overwhelming wave of Northern invaders, that would sweep over Kentucky and TennesseeKentucky and Tennessee, extending to the northern part of the Cotton States, if not to New Orleans. Similar views were expressed in regard to ultimate results, in Northwestern Virginia, being dependent upon the success or failure of this army; and various other special i
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
government had not yet recovered from the effects of defeat, none of the points from which troops were to be drawn for this movement were seriously threatened; some of them were not menaced at all; and this offensive movement would have forced the Federal government to recall its scattered troops for the protection of those points upon which the Confederate army would have been able to march after the fall of Washington. The moral effect of such an exhibition of power on the governments of England and France would have been of incalculable benefit to the Confederacy. Upon the submission of this plan to Generals Johnston and Smith, the latter at once approved it, and the former, though for some time unwilling, finally yielded his assent. President Davis arrived at Fairfax Court-House on the 30th of September, and remained there two days, at General Beauregard's headquarters. In the conferences which followed between him and Generals Johnston, Beauregard, and Smith, he objected
Germantown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
all the forces in Loudon County, the object being to protect that region against Federal incursions, about which numerous complaints were made. It was about that time that General Beauregard resolved to throw his own forces forward. He hoped, by an advance, to be able more easily to take the offensive, or draw on a battle, while the enemy was yet demoralized and undisciplined. Accordingly, on the 9th and 10th, Longstreet's brigade was moved to Fairfax Court-House, and D. R. Jones's to Germantown. Bonham was drawn back from Vienna to Flint Hill, leaving a strong mounted guard at the former place. Cocke was stationed at Centreville; Ewell at Sangster's Crossroads; Early and Hampton at the intersection of the Occoquan with the Wolf Run Shoals road; and the Louisiana brigade at Mitchell's Ford. Elzey's brigade, of General Johnston's forces, was placed in the immediate vicinity of Fairfax Station, and Jackson's, also of General Johnston's forces, held a position near the crossing of
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
convinced that the foregoing statement is not only correct as far as it goes, but, in my opinion, it gives a fair idea of all that occurred at that time in regard to the question of our crossing the Potomac. G. W. Smith, Maj.-Gen. C. S. A. Centreville, Va., January 31st, 1862. Signed in Triplicate. Our recollections of that conference agree fully with this statement of General G. W. Smith. G. T. Beauregard, Gen. C. S. A., J. E. Johnston, Gen. C. S. A. Centreville, Va., January 31st, 1Centreville, Va., January 31st, 1862. Signed in Triplicate. This is what took place at the Fairfax Court-House conference. It confirms what we have already stated at the beginning of the present chapter. We now resume our review of Mr. Davis's remarks about it. In that authoritative tone which ill befits him to-day, and frees from undue courtesy towards him those whom he so cavalierly misrepresents, Mr. Davis, with a view to impugn the veracity of the authors of the foregoing memorandum, writes as follows: It does
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
carry the war into their country. I answered, Fifty thousand effective seasoned soldiers; explaining that by seasoned soldiers I meant such men as we had here present for duty; and added that they would have to be drawn from the peninsula about Yorktown, Norfolk, from Western Virginia, Pensacola, or wherever might be most expedient. General Johnston and General Beauregard both said that a force of sixty thousand such men would be necessary; and that this force would require large additional less than three weeks time, have transported to the borders of Virginia, to reinforce the army said, by those who knew it best, to be in the finest fighting condition. He was asked for such troops as could then be found in the peninsula around Yorktown, in Western Virginia, at Pensacola, at Mobile, at Charleston, at New Orleans; points from which about twenty-five thousand men—five thousand more than were needed —could have been withdrawn without unnecessarily exposing the positions they occup
Vienna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
take the offensive, or draw on a battle, while the enemy was yet demoralized and undisciplined. Accordingly, on the 9th and 10th, Longstreet's brigade was moved to Fairfax Court-House, and D. R. Jones's to Germantown. Bonham was drawn back from Vienna to Flint Hill, leaving a strong mounted guard at the former place. Cocke was stationed at Centreville; Ewell at Sangster's Crossroads; Early and Hampton at the intersection of the Occoquan with the Wolf Run Shoals road; and the Louisiana brigaderough Colonel George W. Lay, long a resident of Washington, proposed to General Johnston, now that they were in our hands, to hold and support them by the following arrangement of troops: 1 brigade (Bonham's) at or about old Court-House, near Vienna. 2 brigades (D. R. Jones's and Cocke's) at or about Falls Church. 1 brigade (Longstreet's) at or about Munson's Hill. 1 brigade (Johnston's forces) half-way between Mason's and Munson's Hills. 1 brigade (Johnston's forces) at Mason's Hill. 2 bri
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