hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
G. T. Beauregard 2,953 73 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 459 3 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 448 0 Browse Search
L. Polk 387 13 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 380 16 Browse Search
A. S. Johnston 328 0 Browse Search
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) 260 6 Browse Search
W. J. Hardee 241 3 Browse Search
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) 207 115 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 206 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

Found 208 total hits in 49 results.

1 2 3 4 5
eral Totten expressed both surprise and pain, and used every endeavor to dissuade him—we need not add, without success. Major Beauregard then went to the headquarters of General Scott, to inform him also of his intended resignation; but failed to find the general, as he was temporarily absent from Washington. Major Beauregard had been authorized by General Totten, so anxious was the latter to retain him in the service, to defer assuming command at West Point until after the close of the January examinations; and, in the meantime, having nothing to detain him in Washington, he left for New York, to await further developments. In New York he met several army friends, among others, Captain G. W. Smith, ex-officer of Engineers, then acting as Street Commissioner of the great northern metropolis, and Captain Mansfield Lovell. The absorbing topic of the day was necessarily brought forward and earnestly discussed. Major Beauregard informed them of his intention to follow his State s
February 26th (search for this): chapter 2
Scott, as one of the alternatives of action, had counselled the mild measure of allowing the erring sisters to go in peace. It was not surprising, therefore, that many persons could not be made to believe in such a war, until, after their eyes had seen the flashes and their ears had heard the sounds of the guns fired at Sumter, the United States government called for 75,000 troops with which to reduce the Southern people to obedience. Major Beauregard arrived at Montgomery on the 26th of February, and on the same day called on the Secretary of War. Just in time, said the latter, while courteously extending his hand, to assist me out of a great dilemma. He was estimating the weight and cost of pieces of ordnance of different calibers, Major Beauregard cheerfully gave him what assistance he could, and took the liberty to suggest the advisability of procuring, as soon as possible, the different heads of bureaus whom the secretary needed, to relieve him of all such annoying detail
o his own State. With these views, and under such circumstances, it was but natural he should feel anxious in leaving Louisiana, while public opinion had not yet established its level, and the South was still uncertain as to the proper step to pursue in vindication of its imperilled rights. However—and happen what might—there was but one course open to him, and his determination was taken at once: to stand by his State, and share its destiny, for weal or woe. Towards the latter part of December of that year he left New Orleans for West Point, stopping on his way in Washington, to ascertain, if he could, what shape future events would probably assume, Several Southern States had already called their people in conventions, to determine what measures should be adopted in view of the exigencies of the hour. South Carolina had passed her Ordinance of Secession. Mississippi soon followed. So did Florida and Alabama. Louisiana, it was thought by her congressional delegation, would
mmand at West point, but is immediately relieved.–Returns to New Orleans. is offered the rank of Colonel of Engineers and artillery in the Louisiana State forces, Declines. plan to obstruct river near Forts. floating booms. is summoned to Montgomery by President Davis. ordered to Charleston, S. C., to assume command and direct operations against Fort Sumter.> while in charge of the military defences of Louisiana, and of the construction of the New Orleans custom-house, in the fall of 1860, General Beauregard, then brevet Major of United States Engineers, received the following order from Washington: Special order, no. 238. War Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 8th, 1860. By direction of the President, brevet Major Peter G. T. Beauregard, Corps of Engineers, is appointed superintendent of the Military Academy, and will relieve the present superintendent at the close of the approaching semi-annual examination of cadets. By order of the S
November 8th, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 2
loating booms. is summoned to Montgomery by President Davis. ordered to Charleston, S. C., to assume command and direct operations against Fort Sumter.> while in charge of the military defences of Louisiana, and of the construction of the New Orleans custom-house, in the fall of 1860, General Beauregard, then brevet Major of United States Engineers, received the following order from Washington: Special order, no. 238. War Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 8th, 1860. By direction of the President, brevet Major Peter G. T. Beauregard, Corps of Engineers, is appointed superintendent of the Military Academy, and will relieve the present superintendent at the close of the approaching semi-annual examination of cadets. By order of the Secretary of War. S. Cooper, Adjutant-General. This was not only an honorable position, much coveted, and justly so, in the army, but it was also a highly responsible one, to which none but officers of the
February 8th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 2
He knew little of the defences of Charleston, and was not familiar with its people; whereas he was thoroughly acquainted with those of New Orleans; and, although perfectly willing to serve the Confederacy to the utmost of his ability, wherever sent, he thought his services were first due to the defence and protection of his own State. There was another impediment, though, under the circumstances, of much less gravity. His resignation from the United States army, dated and forwarded February 8th, 1861, had not yet been, to his knowledge, accepted; and still regardful of the strict observance of rules and regulations to which he had been trained, he was disinclined to take up arms against the United States flag until officially relieved from his fealty to it. This he explained to President Davis, who, after urging his acceptance of the position offered, and promising that he should if necessary, be sent back to New Orleans, suggested that he should at once telegraph to the War Depart
February 22nd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 2
ks of Governor Moore for his valuable information, of the importance of which the governor was well aware, but the Military Board, to whom all such matters were specially referred, and on whose knowledge of them the State Executive so fully relied, failed to see the extent of the result aimed at, and, as was often the case during the war, the opportunity was allowed to slip by; and the consequences, which might have been averted, advanced unhindered to their calamitous end. On the 22d of February, 1861, Major Beauregard received a despatch from the Hon. L. P. Walker, Secretary of War of the Confederate government, informing him that his immediate presence at Montgomery was requested by President Davis. He made all possible haste to leave New Orleans, thinking he might be away for two or three weeks at the utmost—he was absent more than four years. The hope of Major Beauregard was, that he might be permanently stationed in Louisiana, with all the sea-coast of which, and the approac
April, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 2
floating boom. The estimate for this obstruction was about $90,000, and for the other about one half less. Both were to be illuminated at night with Drummond lights, placed in bombproofs on each side of the river, and the stream was to be patrolled by boats as far down as prudence would permit. Had these floating booms been constructed and kept in working order until required for effectual use it is beyond all doubt that they would have obstructed the passage of the Federal fleet in April, 1862. Detaining the vessels under the fire of the forts, they would have afforded sufficient time to them to do their work, and to the city to prepare for a vigorous defence, if not for a triumphant resistance. Somewhat later, Major Beauregard had occasion to offer a few suggestions to the Military Board, in a short memoir, wherein, after giving his general views as to the defence of the different approaches to New Orleans, he again directed attention to the paramount necessity of the floa
Numa Augustin (search for this): chapter 2
and informed him that his services were required to complete the defences to the approaches of the city, which were already in full possession of the State authorities. His answer was that he could not do so until he had formally resigned his commission in the United States service. This he did that day, and then joined, as a private, the battalion of Orleans Guards, composed of the élite of the Creole population of the city of New Orleans. This command had just been organized by Colonel Numa Augustin, than whom no better citizen soldier was known, in the volunteer service of the State. The excitement and enthusiasm of the people of Louisiana and of New Orleans, especially, were intense. The shrill sound of the fife, the beating of drums, squad drills at street corners and in public avenues, and an ever-increasing military spirit greeted one at every step. New Orleans had been transformed into a garrison town. All who met Major Beauregard on the streets, friends and even s
Peter G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 2
convinced that such would be the result, Major Beauregard made it a point at once to apprise Generade him—we need not add, without success. Major Beauregard then went to the headquarters of General d, and perhaps because he had no faith in Major Beauregard's Union sympathies, peremptorily remandedrmed into a garrison town. All who met Major Beauregard on the streets, friends and even strangerm. During his short sojourn at the North Major Beauregard had seen and heard enough to make him douragg was appointed Brigadier-General, and Major Beauregard was offered the position of Colonel of Enous end. On the 22d of February, 1861, Major Beauregard received a despatch from the Hon. L. P. Wty until after the battle of Manassas. Major Beauregard then presented himself to Mr. Davis, who to resort to force against it. He read to Major Beauregard a letter he had just received from Governion of the condition of affairs there. Major Beauregard having with him a map of Charleston, give[17 more...]
1 2 3 4 5