hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
G. T. Beauregard 3,199 167 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 638 0 Browse Search
Florida (Florida, United States) 544 0 Browse Search
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) 520 4 Browse Search
Savannah (Georgia, United States) 480 26 Browse Search
Headquarters (Washington, United States) 466 0 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 382 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 368 54 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 356 0 Browse Search
Comdg 353 131 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865.

Found 29,157 total hits in 4,562 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
control of the Secretary of War. S. Cooper, A. & I. G. This was not welcome news, for if it implied increase of territorial authority, it indicated no prospect of corresponding numerical strength in the Department. General Beauregard answered in these terms: Headquarters, Dept. S. C. And Ga., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 8th, 1862. General Samuel Cooper, Adjt. and Insp.-Genl., Richmond, Va.: General,—I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt, this day, of your telegram of the 7th instant, communicating information of the extension of the limits of this Department to include all of the State of Georgia, and so much of Florida as is situated east of the Appalachicola River. I beg to say that I trust this extension of the territory of the Department will be followed, at an early day, by a commensurate increase of the forces to guard it. It is proper for me to say, that the more urgent importance of the defence of the ports of Charleston and Savannah must necessarily occupy
d on the 1st of April. dispositions taken by him. General Lee's withdrawal from Petersburg. evacuation of Richmond. General Beauregard returns to Greensboroa. Receives despatches from Mr. Davis on the 4th and 5th. goes back to Raleigh on the 7th, and to Smithfield on the 8th. the President urges him to come to Danville. surrender of General Lee's Army. President Davis goes to Greensboroa. General Beauregard awaits him there. interview between them on the 11th. President Davis's despvelopments, received the following answer: near Smithfield, April 6th, 1865. General G. T. Beauregard: It is not necessary to remain longer. No news from General Lee. J. E. Johnston. General Beauregard consequently returned, on the 7th, to Raleigh, which was, properly speaking, his headquarters at that time. He was anxious to see and confer with General Johnston about the disastrous events which, from all sides, were now crowding upon the country; and, on the 8th, he started fo
n by this fort in the action with the ironclad fleet of the Abolitionists on the 7th of this month. On the 5th the attacking fleet, consisting of eight turreted gok a position about three miles and a half or four miles from this fort. On the 7th it advanced in the direction of the harbor, one of the turreted boats some distatructions Major Echols has made a report in detail of the engagement, on the 7th instant, of the enemy's ironclad fleet with the forts and batteries commanding the o commanding the First Military District, South Carolina, of the battle of the 7th ultimo, together with the reports of his subordinate officers, and of Majors D. B. H and Insp.-Genl., Richmond, Va.: General,—I arrived at Newnan, Ga., on the 7th inst., where, having ascertained that General Hood's headquarters were at Cedar Tow., Nov. 15th, 1864. Col. G. W. Brent, A. A. G.: The following despatch of 7th inst. received from General Hodge: Canby at Memphis. Hurlbut in command of departm
Bluff, though, most desirable, was, he feared, liable to be cut off and seized by the enemy. He desired the construction of a work for two or three 24-pounders, to command the North Santee, at a bluff near Ladson's, in the direction of Hame's Ferry. He also inquired about the condition of the battery of one 32-pounder, commanding the South Santee, and wished to know whether or not the stream could be so obstructed as to allow the removal of that gun to the battery at Ladson's. 5. On the 7th General Mercer was requested to confer with Commodore Tatnall, C. S. N., commanding the Naval Department in Savannah, concerning the fitting out of a small gunboat (not ironclad) with heavy guns, to be placed in a cut near the river obstructions, where the ground was known to be low and soft. General Beauregard suggested the construction of an iron shield on board, arranged to protect the guns, and the throwing up of a levee around the gunboat further to secure its safety. He thought it wou
Chapter 30: General Beauregard orders the Cummings's Point Battery to be strengthened. Citadel Cadets assigned to the New Bridge defences. the ironclads cross the bar on the 5th. Admiral Dupont makes his attack on the 7th. order in which the ships came up. their armament. Admiral Dupont's plan of battle. Fort Sumter the Chief object of attack. its reduction supposed to be inevitable. commanders of Forts Sumter and Moultrie, and the various batteries engaged. how they were armed. number of guns employed by the Confederates. cautious approach of the monitors. Fort Moultrie opens fire on them. Fort Sumter does likewise. description of the fight. Fort Sumter Cripples the New Ironsides. the Passaic Withdraws from the fight. two more ironclads forced to retire. the Keokuk engages Fort Sumter. she is badly damaged. importance of the defeat inflicted on the enemy. the Keokuk sinks near Morris Island on the 8th. on the 12th the monitors steam, and are towed
o send 500 infantry and one light battery to report to Brigadier-General Mercer, in Savannah. The enemy on Morris Island worked laboriously on his batteries and trenches, while strong reinforcements of troops were daily seen arriving. On the 7th I received a telegram from you informing me that the balance of Colquitt's brigade was ordered to Charleston. There was little firing throughout the day. Only two casualties occurred on Morris Island. On the 8th Brigadier-General Evans reporgazines, therefore, were not destroyed. The guns in the batteries were spiked as far as their condition allowed, and the implements generally destroyed, and equipments carried off. The evacuation was concluded at about 1 1/2 h. A. M. of the 7th inst. The boats containing the portion of the garrison last embarked were fired upon by the enemy's barges, but without effect. Only two of our boats, containing crews of about 19 men and 27 soldiers—or some 46 in all—were captured by the enemy's ar
t Sumter, now apparently harmless, would probably be the object of his attack. This had become much the more likely because the Admiral—emboldened, no doubt, by his coadjutor's recent achievement—had, as early as 6.35 A. M., on the morning of the 7th, demanded, by flag of truce, the surrender of Fort Sumter. If not complied with, he telegraphed to General Gillmore, I will move up with all the ironclads and engage it. General Gillmore's book, p. 335. Major Elliott had declined the request; amith, Asst. Adjt.-Genl. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 30th, 1863. General Samuel Cooper, Adjt. and Insp.-General, Richmond, Va.: General,—The published report of Brigadier-General Gillmore, of the 7th instant, to his government, relative to his acquisition of Batteries Wagner and Gregg, contains several errors, which I feel called upon to correct. 1st. Seventy-five men were not taken on Morris Island, for only two boats' crews—about 19 men and
eston, S. C., Dec. 13th, 1864. To his Excellency President Jefferson Davis, Richmond, Va.: (Confidential.) Sir,—I arrived here, on my way to Savannah, on the evening of the 7th, and remained until the following afternoon, to obtain information relative to the present condition of this Department. The Second and Third Subdistricts, embracing Charleston and its defences, were reported to me short of provisions and ammunition for a siege. I arrived at Pocotaligo during the night of the 8th, and after spending several hours in conference with General Jones as to the state of affairs in that vicinity, I proceeded to Savannah, arriving there on the morning of the 9th. General Jones informed me that, after collecting all that could be safely spared from the other points in the District of South Carolina, his forces consisted of about five thousand five hundred effectives of all arms, of which about three thousand were militia and reserves. Immediately upon my arrival at Savan
ppendix. Owing to unavoidable delays and high-water General Hampton and the cavalry with him could only form a junction with General Hardee, at or near Fayetteville, on the 10th of March, just before the enemy crossed the Cape Fear River, at Cedar Creek, Fayetteville, and Elliott's Ferry, seven miles above. On the 11th the troops under General Bragg were on their way to Goldsboroa from Kinston, where the Federals had been strongly reinforced from Wilmington. They had been beaten, on the 8th, by General Bragg, with Hill's and Hoke's forces, and suffered a loss of about fifteen hundred prisoners and three field-pieces, exclusive of a large number of killed and wounded. It was a creditable affair to the handful of Confederates who took part in it, and we must say that Major-General Cox and the three Federal divisions under him displayed lack of vigor in their resistance. General Hardee now retired towards Averysboroa, leaving a brigade behind Silver Creek, to hold the enemy in
itions taken by him. General Lee's withdrawal from Petersburg. evacuation of Richmond. General Beauregard returns to Greensboroa. Receives despatches from Mr. Davis on the 4th and 5th. goes back to Raleigh on the 7th, and to Smithfield on the 8th. the President urges him to come to Danville. surrender of General Lee's Army. President Davis goes to Greensboroa. General Beauregard awaits him there. interview between them on the 11th. President Davis's despatches of that day. General Bturned, on the 7th, to Raleigh, which was, properly speaking, his headquarters at that time. He was anxious to see and confer with General Johnston about the disastrous events which, from all sides, were now crowding upon the country; and, on the 8th, he started for Smithfield, where he and General Johnston exchanged views. He returned during the same evening to Raleigh. On the day following this telegram, in cipher, was handed to General Beauregard: Danville, April 9th, 1865. Gener
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...