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Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865.

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August 29th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 1
marauding, were also mentioned in General Pemberton's estimate. See General Pemberton's letter, in Appendix to this chapter. General Beauregard adopted this estimate as a basis for his future calculations, and on that day assumed command in an order which ran as follows: Headquarters, Dept. S. C. & Ga., Charleston, Sept. 24th, 1862. I assume command of this Department pursuant to Paragraph XV., Special Orders No. 202, Adjutant and Inspector-General's Office, Richmond, August 29th, 1862. All existing orders will remain in force until otherwise directed from the headquarters. In entering upon my duties, which may involve at an early day the defence of two of the most important cities in the Confederate States against the most formidable efforts of our powerful enemy, I shall rely on the ardent patriotism, the intelligence, and unconquerable spirit of the officers and men under my command to sustain me successfully. But to maintain our posts with credit to our cou
Albert Sidney Johnston (search for this): chapter 1
nton, Secretary of War. At a later date General Beauregard succeeded in recovering his baggage; but, despite his endeavors and the promise of high Federal officials, he could not get his papers. These were finally placed in the War Records office, and through the attention of the gentlemanly officers in charge he has been able to procure such copies of them as were indispensable for the purposes of this work. We are credibly informed that military papers and documents belonging to General A. S. Johnston, and embracing only six or seven months of the beginning of the war, were bought, a few years ago, from his heirs for the sum of ten thousand dollars; while General Beauregard's papers, relating to upwards of twenty months of a most interesting part of our struggle, are kept and used by the Government with no lawful claim to them and in violation, as we hold, of the articles of surrender agreed upon by Generals Johnston and Sherman. We may add that General Beauregard is not only dep
September 10th (search for this): chapter 1
on. C. J. Villere, Member of Congress from Louisiana, and brother-in-law to General Beauregard. on September 1st, telegraphed him as follows: Would you prefer the Trans-Mississippi to Charleston? His characteristic reply was: Have no preference to express. Will go wherever ordered. Do for the best. The War Department had already issued orders assigning him to duty in South Carolina and Georgia, with Headquarters at Charleston; but he did not become aware of the fact until the 10th of September. See General Cooper's despatch, in the Appendix to this chapter. He left the next day for his new field of action, and, in a telegram apprising General Cooper of his departure, asked that copies of his orders and instructions should be sent to meet him in Charleston. Thus it is shown that the petition to President Davis, spoken of in the preceding chapter, was presented while General Beauregard was on his way to his new command, in obedience to orders from Richmond, and that he k
September 15th (search for this): chapter 1
Military operations of General Beauregard. Chapter 26: Effort made to obtain a suitable command for General Beauregard. he is assigned to duty in South Carolina and Georgia. he reaches Charleston on the 15th of September. unpopularity of General Pemberton. pleasure of the City and State authorities at General Beauregard's superseding him. loss of General Beauregard's papers of this period of the war. General Beauregard's tour of inspection throughout his Department. criticiamiliar spot to General Beauregard, and one much liked and appreciated by him. With the certainty he now had of not being reinstated in his former command, no other appointment could have given him so much pleasure. He arrived there on the 15th of September, and received a warm and cordial greeting both from the people and from the authorities. It was evident that grave apprehensions were felt for the safety of the city—that cradle of the rebellion, as it was called by the Northern press. An
September 16th (search for this): chapter 1
ender agreed upon by Generals Johnston and Sherman. We may add that General Beauregard is not only deprived of his property, but is forced to pay for copies of his own papers whenever the necessity arises to make use of them. General Pemberton was anxious to turn over his command to General Beauregard, but the latter would not accept it until he had examined, in company with that officer, all the important points and defences of the Department as it then stood. Accordingly, on the 16th of September, they began a regular tour of inspection which lasted until the 21st. They were, at that date, in Savannah. On the 24th, having returned to Charleston, General Beauregard went through the usual formality of assuming command. The result of his inspection is given in his official notes, to be found in the Appendix to the present chapter. He made his report as favorable as possible, and was not over-critical, especially in matters of engineering, as he well knew his predecessor had
e telegraphed General Cobb to forward these important documents to Atlanta, through which city he knew he would have to pass on his way to Louisiana. They never reached that point. General Wilson, commanding the Federal cavalry in Georgia, took possession of them while in transitu to Atlanta, with a portion of General Beauregard's personal baggage. Immediate efforts were made to secure their restoration, but in vain: baggage and papers were sent to Washington by order, it was said, of Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War. At a later date General Beauregard succeeded in recovering his baggage; but, despite his endeavors and the promise of high Federal officials, he could not get his papers. These were finally placed in the War Records office, and through the attention of the gentlemanly officers in charge he has been able to procure such copies of them as were indispensable for the purposes of this work. We are credibly informed that military papers and documents belonging to General A
n Appendix, General Jordan's letter to Captain Echols, ChiefEn-gineer. The expedient proved quite a success, for a time, but the stone anchors could not long withstand the force of the tide. General Beauregard now caused the following instructions to be given to his chief of ordnance: Headquarters, Department of S. C. And Ga., Charleston, S. C., October 1st, 1862. Major J. J. Pope, Chief of Ordnance, etc.: Major,—The commanding general instructs me to direct that the order of 25th ult. stands thus: That you cause the immediate transfer of the 10-inch, columbiad (old pattern), now in the Water Battery, to the left of Fort Pemberton, to Fort Sumter, with carriage, implements, and ammunition. Also that three 32-pounders, smooth, from Fort Sumter, and on barbette carriages, be moved to the said Water Battery, to the left of Fort Pemberton. You will likewise transfer to the new batteries, on Sullivan's Island, the 8-inch columbiad, now at Fort Johnson, with its implements,
A. S. Johnston (search for this): chapter 1
ibly informed that military papers and documents belonging to General A. S. Johnston, and embracing only six or seven months of the beginning of the war, were bought, a few years ago, from his heirs for the sum of ten thousand dollars; while General Beauregard's papers, relating to upwards of twenty months of a most interesting part of our struggle, are kept and used by the Government with no lawful claim to them and in violation, as we hold, of the articles of surrender agreed upon by Generals Johnston and Sherman. We may add that General Beauregard is not only deprived of his property, but is forced to pay for copies of his own papers whenever the necessity arises to make use of them. General Pemberton was anxious to turn over his command to General Beauregard, but the latter would not accept it until he had examined, in company with that officer, all the important points and defences of the Department as it then stood. Accordingly, on the 16th of September, they began a regula
September 24th (search for this): chapter 1
nterior lines most defective. General long attributes these lines to General R. E. Lee. error of General long. General Pemberton's estimates of the minimum forces necessary for the defence of Charleston. General Beauregard assumes command September 24th. General Pemberton given command of Department of the Mississippi. conference of officers on the 29th. matters discussed by them. General Beauregard begins the armament of forts and the erection of fortifications. anchorage of boom in th as the guns for its protection can be secured. G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. D. N. Ingraham, Com. Comdg. C. S. Naval Forces, Charleston Harbor. That sketch of the situation, together with General Beauregard's Notes of Inspection, dated September 24th, and General Pemberton's minimum estimate of men and guns required for a proper defence of the Department, give so complete and correct a statement of its condition and needs, at that time, that we deem it unnecessary to add anything further.
October 2nd (search for this): chapter 1
auregard's efforts did not stop there. He asked the War Department for additional guns, which he considered indispensable for the safety of Charleston, as he placed no great reliance upon the strength and stability of the boom then being constructed. His letter to Colonel Miles, M. C., Chairman of the Military Committee of the House (extracts from which are given in the Appendix to this chapter), fully explains his views on the subject. So do his communications, dated September 30th and October 2d, to General Cooper. See Appendix to this chapter. The Northern newspapers were filled with indications of an approaching attack upon Charleston. The preparatory measures for such an expedition were represented as very formidable. Without entirely believing those rumors, General Beauregard used every endeavor to put himself in a state of readiness. He advised Governor Pickens, if it were the intention of the people and State to defend the city to the last extremity—as he was disp
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