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Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865.

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eneral,—I arrived in Charleston on the 13th of September, 1862, and assumed command on the 24th of that month. In the interval I was engaged in ascertaining the plans and measures taken by Major-General Pemberton, my predecessor, for the defence, particularly, of Charleston and Savannah, and in rapid inspections of the condition and defensive resources of the Department, the results of which were communicated to the War Department in two papers, dated, the one relative to Charleston, on the 3d, and the other, chiefly concerning Savannah, on the 10th of October, 1862. At the time the troops in that Department (as then arranged) consisted of— In South Carolina. Infantry6,564 Artillery in position1,787 Field artillery1,379 Cavalry2,817 ——12,547 In Georgia. Infantry3,834 Artillery in position1,330 Field artillery445 Cavalry1,580 ——7,189 —— Total of all arms in Department19,736 Of this force, 1787 artillery in position, 727 light artillerists, 4139 infantr
mber. His letter to General Cooper, dated November 6th, is more explicit, and gives a full and correct statement of the amended plan of operations adopted on the 3d, after thorough discussion of the subject by Generals Beauregard and Hood. The reader will, no doubt, peruse it with interest: Headquarters, Military divisi army from Jonesboroa, Ga., to that date, and for a statement of his plan of future operations for the authorities at Richmond, accompanied by his reply, on the 3d instant, enclosing copies of his telegrams to the Government during the period referred to. I renewed my request on the 4th instant for his plan, and on the same day reen General Beauregard and himself. 1 forward copies of three letters and their several enclosures. The plan referred to, which was discussed and approved on the 3d, subject to such modifications as the movements of the enemy might determine, was to move as soon as possible from Florence into Middle Tennessee, towards Lawrenceb
wards reporting for duty; and to the fact that the Georgia State troops, or reserves, amounting to about fifteen hundred effectives, were not allowed to pass beyond the boundaries of their State, and were, therefore, not available for any operations in the two Carolinas. Cheatham's and Stewart's corps had also been delayed on their march from Tupelo, Miss.; and Lee's corps, under Major-General C. L. Stevenson, was still destitute of its means of transportation and of its artillery. On the 3d General Hill was required to return one of the brigades of Lee's corps which he then had with him at Green's Cut Station, and the following order was thereupon issued to Major-General Stevenson: Augusta, Feb. 3d, 1865. General,—General Beauregard desires that you will forthwith move with your corps by rail to Branchville, and assume command at that point of all troops which may be there. You will carry with you five days cooked rations. On reaching Branchville you will open communi
, March 4th, 1863. Major H. C. Guerin, Chief of Subsistence: Major,—In reply to yours of the 3d inst. I am instructed to inform you that the aggregate, present and absent, of the troops in the Statail of the engagement of the enemy with the battery at Genesis Point (Fort McAllister), on the 3d instant, which I have the honor to hand you herewith. This interesting report is based chiefly upon pickets had been thrown forward to Cedar Creek, within six or seven miles of Jacksonville. On the 3d Major-General J. Patton Anderson also arrived at Camp Milton, and assumed command on the 6th instaGeneral,—General Beauregard has directed me to acknowledge receipt of your communication of the 3d inst., with the copies of your telegrams to the government. He however expresses the hope that you Headquarters, D. W. La., Shreveport, Jan. 5th, 1865. Colonel,—Your letter of the 3d inst., relating to the crossing of troops to the east bank of the Mississippi River, and enclosing co<
er 6th, 1864. General,—I have the honor to enclose for the information of the War Office copy of a communication addressed to General J. B. Hood, on the 30th ultimo, asking a summary of the operations of his army from Jonesboroa, Ga., to that date, and for a statement of his plan of future operations for the authorities at Richmond, accompanied by his reply, on the 3d instant, enclosing copies of his telegrams to the Government during the period referred to. I renewed my request on the 4th instant for his plan, and on the same day received a reply, stating that it was not possible for him to furnish any plan of future operations, as so much depended on the movements of the enemy; the matter having been fully discussed between General Beauregard and himself. 1 forward copies of three letters and their several enclosures. The plan referred to, which was discussed and approved on the 3d, subject to such modifications as the movements of the enemy might determine, was to move as s
and that four or five gunboats in the St. John's effectually commanded the approaches to the place. Under these circumstances it was determined not to attempt to carry the position by assault, as, in effect, instructed by your telegram of the 4th instant. Everything indicates that the rout of the enemy at Ocean Pond or Olustee was complete; nevertheless, the fruits of the victory were comparatively insignificant, and mainly because of the inefficiency of the officer commanding the cavalry at ur obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard. Headquarters, Military division of the West, Charlotte, N. C., March 6th, 1865. Lieut.-Genl. W. J. Hardee, Rockingham, via Troy: General,—I have just received a copy of your telegram of the 4th inst., from Rockingham to General Johnston, who is on his way to Fayetteville. You should have followed the instructions contained in my letter of the 26th ult. (acknowledged by Colonel Roy) and not of the 24th. Fayetteville and Raleigh being evid
not ironclad) with heavy guns, to be placed in a cut near the river obstructions, where the ground was known to be low and soft. General Beauregard suggested the construction of an iron shield on board, arranged to protect the guns, and the throwing up of a levee around the gunboat further to secure its safety. He thought it would be a great saving, both of time and labor. 6. On the 8th of November he wrote the following letter to Governor Pickens: Governor,—Your letter of the 5th inst. was received after I had given the orders for Cash's regiment to report to General Walker, who, being nearest to the enemy, will require one of the best colonels with him; but I will endeavor to leave him in the Georgetown District. With regard to the labor furnished for the defences of the city, the planters have done nobly, but they must not stop three-fourths of the way. Should Charleston fall for want of proper works, they will be the largest sufferers in the end. Your idea of organ
Chapter 30: General Beauregard orders the Cummings's Point Battery to be strengthened. Citadel Cadets assigned to the New Bridge defences. the ironclads cross the bar on the 5th. Admiral Dupont makes his attack on the 7th. order in which the ships came up. their armament. Admiral Dupont's plan of battle. Fort Sumter the Chief object of attack. its reduction supposed to be inevitable. commanders of Forts Sumter and Moultrie, and the various batteries engaged. how they werets premonitory signs, as reported by the Signal Corps, were—first, the increase of the enemy's force in the Stono and the North Edisto; second, the unusual activity visible among the vessels composing the fleet. In fact, during the evening of the 5th, the ironclads, including the frigate New Ironsides and eight monitors, had actually crossed the bar, and anchored in the main ship channel. Though out of range as yet, they had not before approached so near. There was but one conclusion to draw
for an attempt to capture the enemy's pickets in the Marsh Battery, near Vincent's Creek. On the 5th the guns in Battery Wagner were all in fighting order. Our sharp-shooters, armed with Whitworth g the night of the 4th the enemy's approach was pushed close to Battery Wagner. At 12 M., on the 5th, the Federal flag, which had been one hundred yards south of Wagner, was abreast of the south an to believe that the enemy's plan was to carry Battery Gregg by a boat attack on the night of the 5th, or early on the morning of the 6th; that the fleet should prevent the landing of reinforcements purpose sailors or men able to handle boats and oars with efficiency were essential. On the 5th inst. Brigadier-General Ripley, commanding the First Military District, prepared, by my order, as pehed; the whole fort is much weakened; a repetition to-morrow of to-day's fire (alluding to the 5th inst.) will make the work almost a ruin. The mortar fire is still very heavy and fatal, and no impo
ee on entering that State. One coming from you, as commander of the army, and one from Governor Harris, he regards as highly important. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Geo. Wm. Brent, Col., and A. A. G. General J. B. Hood, Comdg., etc., etc. Meanwhile the pontoon-bridge was commenced; it was completed on the 2d of November. General Steven D. Lee's corps was then thrown across the river, and immediately started some defensive lines around Florence. These were inspected, on the 5th, by General Beauregard, who materially modified all that part of them which was commanded by a height in front. Two divisions of General S. D. Leo's corps were now advanced on Shoal Creek, about seven or eight miles north of Florence. Unfortunately, heavy rains began on the 2d, and lasted for many days. The river rose rapidly, and the roads became impassable. Part of the bridge being submerged, Cheatham's corps, which was to have crossed shortly after Lee's, was unavoidably delayed.
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