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Browsing named entities in Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865.

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S. Cooper (search for this): chapter 1
Colonel Miles, M. C., Chairman of the Military Committee of the House (extracts from which are given in the Appendix to this chapter), fully explains his views on the subject. So do his communications, dated September 30th and October 2d, to General Cooper. See Appendix to this chapter. The Northern newspapers were filled with indications of an approaching attack upon Charleston. The preparatory measures for such an expedition were represented as very formidable. Without entirely belid so comprehensive then as at a later period, when based upon more thorough knowledge. The many and great alterations effected by him show how defective most of the works were, and how wellfounded were the concluding remarks of his report to General Cooper: Adaptation of means to an end has not always been consulted in the works around this city and Savannah. Much unnecessary work has been bestowed upon many of them. The Third Military District of South Carolina, with headquarters at McPher
Howell Cobb (search for this): chapter 1
rtment of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. It may be of interest to tell how that loss occurred. When, in the spring of 1864, General Beauregard was ordered to Virginia, to assist General Lee in the defence of Richmond, he sent to General Howell Cobb, at Macon, for safe-keeping, all his official books and papers collected since his departure from the West. After the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston's army at Greensboroa, North Carolina, in April, 1865, he telegraphed General CoGeneral Cobb to forward these important documents to Atlanta, through which city he knew he would have to pass on his way to Louisiana. They never reached that point. General Wilson, commanding the Federal cavalry in Georgia, took possession of them while in transitu to Atlanta, with a portion of General Beauregard's personal baggage. Immediate efforts were made to secure their restoration, but in vain: baggage and papers were sent to Washington by order, it was said, of Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War.
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 1
er words, all those that referred to the period during which he remained in command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. It may be of interest to tell how that loss occurred. When, in the spring of 1864, General Beauregard was ordered to Virginia, to assist General Lee in the defence of Richmond, he sent to General Howell Cobb, at Macon, for safe-keeping, all his official books and papers collected since his departure from the West. After the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston's army at Greensboroa, North Carolina, in April, 1865, he telegraphed General Cobb to forward these important documents to Atlanta, through which city he knew he would have to pass on his way to Louisiana. They never reached that point. General Wilson, commanding the Federal cavalry in Georgia, took possession of them while in transitu to Atlanta, with a portion of General Beauregard's personal baggage. Immediate efforts were made to secure their restoration, but in vain: baggag
of the harbor. Fort Johnson must be held, however, to prevent the possibility of being carried by the enemy by a land attack, and the establishment there of breaching batteries against Fort Sumter. The batteries at White Point Garden, Halfmoon, Lawton's, and McLeod's, for the same reason, cannot be prudently armed at present with heavy guns. 12th. The line of pilings near Fort Ripley is of no service, and is rapidly falling to pieces. 13th. The city could not be saved from bombardment uction of a bridge and road across James Island Creek, about midway the island, near Holmes house. From the western part they can be withdrawn under cover of Fort Pemberton. McLeod's battery is intended to protect the mouth of Wappoo Creek, and Lawton's battery the mouth of James Island Creek, when armed. 16th. With the harbor in the hands of the enemy, the city could still be held by an infantry force by the erection of strong barricades, and with an arrangement of traverses in the street
t is forced to pay for copies of his own papers whenever the necessity arises to make use of them. General Pemberton was anxious to turn over his command to General Beauregard, but the latter would not accept it until he had examined, in company with that officer, all the important points and defences of the Department as it then stood. Accordingly, on the 16th of September, they began a regular tour of inspection which lasted until the 21st. They were, at that date, in Savannah. On the 24th, having returned to Charleston, General Beauregard went through the usual formality of assuming command. The result of his inspection is given in his official notes, to be found in the Appendix to the present chapter. He made his report as favorable as possible, and was not over-critical, especially in matters of engineering, as he well knew his predecessor had but a limited knowledge of that branch of the service, and had, besides, no experienced military engineer to assist him. Many cha
R. E. Lee (search for this): chapter 1
4, General Beauregard was ordered to Virginia, to assist General Lee in the defence of Richmond, he sent to General Howell Coear, this is the system which an over-zealous admirer of General Lee, and a former member of his staff, General A. L. Long, s I have always understood, had materially departed from General Lee's plan of defensive works for the Department. Be that s in the Confederate service; and no one denies that, had General Lee been sent to Charleston, in the fall of 1862, instead ofimony of facts — that it was General Beauregard, and not General Lee, who conceived and built the impenetrable barrier, whichifferent points he mentions as having particularly fixed General Lee's attention—the most threatened points—when he (December to merit in other matters, even where it is a just one. General Lee's reputation rests upon a more solid foundation than sucn but as an officer of little merit. He had accompanied General Lee to the Department of South Carolina and Georgia, with th<
A. L. Long (search for this): chapter 1
l Lee, and a former member of his staff, General A. L. Long, See, in vol. i., No. 2, February, 1t were not that the utter insignificance of General Long's unsubstantiated statements shuts them outholly erroneous and wrongful conclusions of General Long in regard to the sea-coast and other defencote the following passage from his reply to General Long: Pemberton, as I have always understoo comprehensive were these changes that, had General Long chanced to visit those two places and the iistorical Society Papers, page 403. But General Long clung to his error. Instead of acknowledgi This stress laid upon Fort Sumter shows General Long's narrow appreciation of the subject. But d built the impenetrable barrier, which, as General Long truthfully says, defeated the plans of the the coast of South Carolina and Georgia. General Long had forgotten that General Beauregard was tis subject see Chapter V. of this book. But General Long further fails to remember that the differen[3 more...]
April, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 1
ys, the heaviest land and naval attacks known in history. On Sullivan's Island, north of Sumter, was old Fort Moultrie, and half a mile east of it Battery Beauregard, planned by General Beauregard and by him ordered to be built, as early as April, 1861. There were also three or four other batteries, west of Moultrie, some of which had taken a part in the attack on Fort Sumter at the opening of the war. A small work had likewise been commenced by General Pemberton on the extreme east of theregard's report of the defence of Morris Island in July, August, and September, 1863. In his first conference with General Pemberton, General Beauregard learned, with surprise and regret, that the system of coast defences he had devised in April, 1861, had been entirely abandoned, because of the anticipated attack of Federal monitors and ironclads, not yet completed; and that an interior system of defences, requiring much additional labor, armament, and expense, had been adopted, which open
ving particularly fixed General Lee's attention—the most threatened points—when he (December, 1861) assumed command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida (namely, the Stono, the Edisto, the Combahee, Coosawhatchie, the sites opposite Hilton Head, on the Broad, on the Salkahatchie, etc.) were not, after all, the points actually attacked by the united land and naval forces of the enemy—were not the sites of the impenetrable barrier against which the combined efforts of Admiral Dahlgren and General Gillmore were fruitlessly made. The real barrier that stopped them, and through which they could never break, consisted in the magnificent works on James, Sullivan's, and Morris Islands, and in different parts of the Charleston Harbor, and in the city proper—all due to the engineering capacity of General Beauregard, who conceived and executed them. Unreflecting friends are worse at times than avowed enemies. They often belittle instead of elevating the object of their
April, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 1
ious obstacles: first, the necessity of condensing into a few chapters a narrative of events which of itself would furnish material for a separate work; second, the loss of most of General Beauregard's official papers, from September, 1862, to April, 1864; in other words, all those that referred to the period during which he remained in command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. It may be of interest to tell how that loss occurred. When, in the spring of 1864, Generasatisfy the reader's mind and amply meet the requirements of history. General Thomas Jordan, the able chief of staff, who so faithfully served in that capacity under General Beauregard from the first battle of Manassas to the latter part of April, 1864, has forcibly exposed what he very aptly terms the wholly erroneous and wrongful conclusions of General Long in regard to the sea-coast and other defences of South Carolina and Georgia. We quote the following passage from his reply to General
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