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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

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Choctaw Bluff (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ns. Very respectfully, your obdt. servt., Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Thus it appears that, immediately after his arrival in Charleston, General Beauregard began to concentrate as many heavy guns as were available in the first line of works, including Fort Sumter, so that they might be used with greater advantage against any naval attack. And the War Department was called upon to allow the transfer to Charleston of other heavy pieces from Ovenbluff, on the Tombigbee River, and Choctaw Bluff, on the Alabama River, where they could be of no use and might be easily dispensed with. The application was granted, provided no objection should be made by the commander of the Department of Alabama and Western Florida. No objection was made. But General Beauregard's efforts did not stop there. He asked the War Department for additional guns, which he considered indispensable for the safety of Charleston, as he placed no great reliance upon the strength and stability of the boom
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
as were available in the first line of works, including Fort Sumter, so that they might be used with greater advantage against any naval attack. And the War Department was called upon to allow the transfer to Charleston of other heavy pieces from Ovenbluff, on the Tombigbee River, and Choctaw Bluff, on the Alabama River, where they could be of no use and might be easily dispensed with. The application was granted, provided no objection should be made by the commander of the Department of Alabama and Western Florida. No objection was made. But General Beauregard's efforts did not stop there. He asked the War Department for additional guns, which he considered indispensable for the safety of Charleston, as he placed no great reliance upon the strength and stability of the boom then being constructed. His letter to Colonel Miles, M. C., Chairman of the Military Committee of the House (extracts from which are given in the Appendix to this chapter), fully explains his views on the
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ral Beauregard. he is assigned to duty in South Carolina and Georgia. he reaches Charleston on theady issued orders assigning him to duty in South Carolina and Georgia, with Headquarters at Charlest's article, entitled Sea-coast Defences of South Carolina and Georgia, page 103. has been injudiciouard to the sea-coast and other defences of South Carolina and Georgia. We quote the following passah of September. At that time the works in South Carolina and Georgia were already planned, and in p Pickens, a thorough reconnoissance of the South Carolina coast, from Charleston to Port Royal; thatnt, which was divided into four districts— South Carolina having three, and Georgia one—General Beautertained of an offensive movement against South Carolina and Georgia, General Beauregard, whose for movements of the enemy along the coast of South Carolina and Georgia could be ascertained with any e most important points along the coast of South Carolina (from Georgetown), Georgia, and Florida, w[2 more...]<
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
the plans of the combined Federal forces operating on the coast of South Carolina and Georgia. General Long had forgotten that General Beauregard was the first Confederate general sent to Charleston, and that he was, in fact, at that time, the only Confederate general in existence; that after he had taken Fort Sumter, and while it was being rehabilitated, he made, as early as 1861, by request of Governor Pickens, a thorough reconnoissance of the South Carolina coast, from Charleston to Port Royal; that he recommended, in a memoir written to that effect, the erection of important works at the mouths of the Stono, the two Edistos, and Georgetown Harbor. For further details on this subject see Chapter V. of this book. But General Long further fails to remember that the different points he mentions as having particularly fixed General Lee's attention—the most threatened points—when he (December, 1861) assumed command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida (namely,
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
assumed command in an order which ran as follows: Headquarters, Dept. S. C. & Ga., Charleston, Sept. 24th, 1862. I assume command of this Department pursuant to Paragraph XV., Special Orders No. 202, Adjutant and Inspector-General's Office, Richmond, August 29th, 1862. All existing orders will remain in force until otherwise directed from the headquarters. In entering upon my duties, which may involve at an early day the defence of two of the most important cities in the Confederate States against the most formidable efforts of our powerful enemy, I shall rely on the ardent patriotism, the intelligence, and unconquerable spirit of the officers and men under my command to sustain me successfully. But to maintain our posts with credit to our country and our own honor, and avoid irremediable disaster, it is essential that all shall yield implicit obedience to any orders emanating from superior authority. Brigadier-General Thomas Jordan is announced as Adjutant and Insp
Winyaw Bay (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
'ks.Cavalry.Total. James Island10,0001000550011,500 Morris Island1,000250501,300 Sullivan's Island1,5008001502,350 Christ Church1,00010012001,300 Saint Andrews2,00020022002,400 Fort Sumter100500600 ——————————— 15,6002,85091,00019,450 Second District6,00020028006,000 Third District6,000 Savannah10,0001,20082,00013,200 ——— Grand total of all arms43,650 Seven companies of cavalry, three batteries of artillery, and three companies of infantry, for the defence of Georgetown and Winyaw Bay, and to prevent marauding, were also mentioned in General Pemberton's estimate. See General Pemberton's letter, in Appendix to this chapter. General Beauregard adopted this estimate as a basis for his future calculations, and on that day assumed command in an order which ran as follows: Headquarters, Dept. S. C. & Ga., Charleston, Sept. 24th, 1862. I assume command of this Department pursuant to Paragraph XV., Special Orders No. 202, Adjutant and Inspe
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
The construction of the boom above alluded to was already under the superintendence of Doctor J. R. Cheves. General Beauregard soon found that he would have to be his own chief-engineer, as the officers of that branch of the service he then had under him, although intelligent and prompt in the discharge of their duties, did not possess sufficient experience. He hastened, therefore, to apply for Captain D. B. Harris, who had been so useful to him in the construction of the works at Centreville, Va., and on the Mississippi River, from Island No.10 to Vicksburg, and who, he was sure, would greatly relieve him of the close supervision required for the new works to be erected, and the many essential alterations to be made in the old ones. His chiefs of artillery and of ordnance were also wanting in experience, but they soon came up to the requirements of their responsible positions, and eventually proved of great assistance to him. Not so with the officers in charge of the Commissary
St. Andrews (Canada) (search for this): chapter 1
imum forces, of all arms, in his opinion essential for a successful defence of Charleston and its dependencies, of the District of South Carolina, of Savannah and its dependencies, and of the District of Georgia. This was the estimate furnished. It bore date September 24th, 1862: STATIONSInfantry.Heavy ArtilleryLight Art'y or Field-w'ks.Cavalry.Total. James Island10,0001000550011,500 Morris Island1,000250501,300 Sullivan's Island1,5008001502,350 Christ Church1,00010012001,300 Saint Andrews2,00020022002,400 Fort Sumter100500600 ——————————— 15,6002,85091,00019,450 Second District6,00020028006,000 Third District6,000 Savannah10,0001,20082,00013,200 ——— Grand total of all arms43,650 Seven companies of cavalry, three batteries of artillery, and three companies of infantry, for the defence of Georgetown and Winyaw Bay, and to prevent marauding, were also mentioned in General Pemberton's estimate. See General Pemberton's letter, in Appendix to
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
he period during which he remained in command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. It may be of interest to tell how that loss occurred. When, in the spring of 1864, Generalints—when he (December, 1861) assumed command of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida (namely, the Stono, the Edisto, the Combahee, Coosawhatchie, the sites opposite Hilton Head, onted, provided no objection should be made by the commander of the Department of Alabama and Western Florida. No objection was made. But General Beauregard's efforts did not stop there. He asked n of the War Department to his numerical weakness, and to the fact that the enemy's lodgment in Florida, even if really intended—which was doubtful—would be of less gravity than an assault, at this j at the most important points along the coast of South Carolina (from Georgetown), Georgia, and Florida, where the enemy's ships or fleets could be observed. An exact register was kept in his office<
McPhersonville (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Cooper: Adaptation of means to an end has not always been consulted in the works around this city and Savannah. Much unnecessary work has been bestowed upon many of them. The Third Military District of South Carolina, with headquarters at McPhersonville, under Colonel (afterwards General) W. S. Walker, was not then in a very promising condition. Reports, considered trustworthy, indicated the enemy's early intention of taking the offensive in that quarter. The lines of defence and the detaccountry. See Colonel Walker's letter, in Appendix to this chapter. General Beauregard's answer was as follows: Headquarters, Dept. S. C. and Ga., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 8th, 1862. Col. W. S. Walker, Comdg. Third Mil. Dist., McPhersonville, S. C.: Colonel,—Your letter of 3d instant, with its enclosures, has been received. Your instructions to the Commanding Officer at Hardeeville and to your pickets are approved of; hone more in detail can be furnished you from here. Our mean
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