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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

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J. C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 23
ral Johnston's last despatch to him; or his views might have been altered by exterior pressure, for he was then at Charlotte, with Mr. Davis, who was still bent on organizing a cavalry force to escort him and his party to the Southwest. General Breckinridge answered: Charlotte, N. C., April 24th, 1865:11 P. M. General J. E. Johnston, Greensboroa, N. C.: Does not your suggestion about disbanding refer to the infantry and most of the artillery? If it be necessary to disband these, ton, General. No answer was given to this. General Johnston received neither orders nor instructions from Mr. Davis after the latter's communication of the 24th of April. His memory serves him amiss if it suggests otherwise—unless General Breckinridge's telegram of the 25th to General Johnston can be considered as an answer from the President; but that, as must be evident to the reader, was not an answer to the foregoing despatch. It was because nothing was heard from the President o
John C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 23
rals Johnston and Sherman on the 18th. General Breckinridge communicates paper to President Davis. his delay in answering. letter of General Breckinridge to President Davis. his final answer to Geincoln. what the South thought of it. General Breckinridge's telegram of April 24th. General Johnit the arrival of the Secretary of War, General Breckinridge, whose presence was deemed necessary ben of the members of the Cabinet present—General Breckinridge included —and receiving the assurance fhe United States in North Carolina. General Breckinridge returned to Greensboroa on the 19th, an3d, forwarded the following telegram to General Breckinridge: General Sherman writes that he expno answer came, but the result was that General Breckinridge saw the President, and also addressed h Greensboroa, April 25th: 10 A. M. Hon. J. C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War: Your despatch nston telegraphed as follows: Hon. J. C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War: I have proposed t[6 more...]<
William Butler (search for this): chapter 23
The small Confederate army, under General Johnston, stood between the two roads leading to Raleigh on the one hand, and to Weldon, on the other, so as to be ahead of the enemy on whichever line of march he might adopt, and in order, also, to be able to unite with the Army of Northern Virginia, in case General Lee should favor such a movement, although it was now, probably, too late to carry it out successfully. The position was wisely selected. Wheeler's cavalry was stationed north, and Butler's south, of the enemy's camps surrounding Goldsboroa. On the 1st of April, owing to a despatch just received from General Lee, empowering him to assume command of all troops from Western Virginia and Western North Carolina within his reach, General Beauregard left Greensboroa for Salisbury. His purpose was, if possible, to confer with Generals Lee and Johnston relative to the actual condition of affairs, and the best disposition to be made of all available troops, from Salisbury to Green
uent use in their industrial pursuits. Artillery horses may be used in field transportation, if necessary. 2. Each brigade or separate body to retain a number of arms equal to one-seventh of its effective strength, which, when the troops reach the capitals of their States, will be disposed of as the General commanding the Department may direct. 3. Private horses, and other private property, for both officers and men, to be retained by them. 4. The Commanding General of the Military Division of West Mississippi, Major-General Canby, will be requested to give transportation by water, from Mobile to New Orleans, to the troops from Arkansas and Texas. 5. The obligations of officers and soldiers to be signed by their immediate commanders. 6. Naval forces within the limits of General Johnston's command to be included in the terms of this convention. J. E. Johnston, Genl. Comdg. Confed. States forces in N. C. J. M. Schofield, Maj.-Genl. Comdg. United States forces in N. C.
Howell Cobb (search for this): chapter 23
as possible, and, in all likelihood, would reach Graham that day. General Beauregard, in his conference with the President, also told him that, from Macon, General Cobb reported that the enemy's cavalry had penetrated North Alabama, from the Tennessee River, threatening Tuscaloosa, Selma, and Montgomery; while another force of cavalry, supported by infantry and artillery, was advancing, through North Georgia, on Atlanta, Columbus, and Macon, where He, General Cobb, had but few troops, principally local and State reserves, to oppose to them. He reported further that General Taylor confirmed the news of the Federal advance on Selma and Montgomery, and a moment. Commanders believe the troops will not fight again. We think your plan impracticable. Major-General Wilson, U. S. A., has captured Macon, with Major-Generals Cobb and G. W. Smith, Brigadiers Mackall and Mercer, and the garrison. Federal papers announce capture of Mobile, with three thousand prisoners. J. E. Johnsto
es authorities so long as they observe their obligation and the laws in force where they may reside. J. E. Johnston, Genl. Comdg. Confed. States forces in N. C. W. T. Sherman, Maj.-Genl. Comdg. United States forces in N. C. Additional termsMaj.-Genl. Comdg. United States forces in N. C. Additional terms were agreed upon the next day between General Johnston and General Schofield, who had been empowered to complete all necessary arrangements relative to the surrender. We ask attention to General Sherman's letter to that effect, in the Appendix. nders. 6. Naval forces within the limits of General Johnston's command to be included in the terms of this convention. J. E. Johnston, Genl. Comdg. Confed. States forces in N. C. J. M. Schofield, Maj.-Genl. Comdg. United States forces in N. C. anders. 6. Naval forces within the limits of General Johnston's command to be included in the terms of this convention. J. E. Johnston, Genl. Comdg. Confed. States forces in N. C. J. M. Schofield, Maj.-Genl. Comdg. United States forces in N. C.
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 23
re. interview between them on the 11th. President Davis's despatches of that day. General Beaurerals Lomax, Walker, and Bradley Johnson. President Davis summons General Johnston to Greensboroa. eneral Breckinridge communicates paper to President Davis. his delay in answering. letter of Geneth the utmost care, in order to tranquillize Mr. Davis, had not the enemy's movements, since the fagiven it, instead of proposed, as written in Mr. Davis's book. The meaning of the despatch is not nemy, so as to interrupt communication. Jeffn. Davis. 4. Greensboroa, N. C., April 11th, 1865ity for your immediate action is based. Jeffn. Davis. 5. Greensboroa, N. C., April 11th, 1865impossibility; and that the only course left Mr. Davis while still, nominally, the Chief Magistratemin, that they agreed with the two generals, Mr. Davis openly stated his objection, basing it mainl forces to proceed with the arrangement. Jefferson Davis. Hardly had the foregoing communic[26 more...]
W. S. Featherstone (search for this): chapter 23
in his reach, General Beauregard left Greensboroa for Salisbury. His purpose was, if possible, to confer with Generals Lee and Johnston relative to the actual condition of affairs, and the best disposition to be made of all available troops, from Salisbury to Greensboroa. As Salisbury appeared to be less threatened than Greensboroa by the enemy's cavalry—Stoneman's—reported to be advancing from Mount Airy and Wytheville, in West Virginia— General Beauregard ordered three brigades, under Featherstone, Shelly, and Gowan, with two light batteries, to move, without delay, in the direction of Greensboroa, whither he returned the same evening. Soon afterwards, Stoneman appearing more directly to threaten Danville, which was then defended by a mere handful of troops, under General H. H. Walker, General Beauregard sent him Shelly's brigade, of some six hundred men, three batteries from Hillsboroa, and also ordered thither General Wheeler's cavalry, which had been sent by General Johnston t<
s: Will await here arrival of President. Road between this place and Danville safe. Raiders are at or near Salem. He then without delay telegraphed General Ferguson to hurry up with his cavalry brigade, from High Point, as fast as he could. The need of cavalry was greatly felt at that hour, not only to oppose the enemy,o young to be very efficient, who had patriotically offered their services, furnishing their own horses and equipments; that he was, however, daily expecting General Ferguson's brigade of cavalry, which was coming from Augusta, Ga., as rapidly as possible, and, in all likelihood, would reach Graham that day. General Beauregard, the Federal cavalry, at Salisbury and other minor points, in relation to which General Beauregard was yet issuing orders to Generals Lomax, Bradley Johnson, and Ferguson, nothing of importance occurred from the 14th to the day of the meeting of Generals Johnston and Sherman. The greater part of the Confederate forces, then temp
e, whether in the army or out of it, had, through a feeling of vengeance and with the approbation of the country, suggested, countenanced, or planned such an act of barbarism, could only be entertained by those who were ignorant of the history of that period, and of the characteristics of the Southern people. Certainly Mr. Lincoln's sad end can no more be laid to the account of the Confederacy, or of any of those who formed part of its government, than the lamentable death of the late President Garfield can be attributed to the Republican party and its leaders. The South knew that, had President Lincoln's life been spared, he would have ratified the treaty entered upon by the commanders of the two armies then in the field; for, as both General Sherman and Admiral Porter testify, he wanted peace on almost any terms, and his greatest desire was to get the men composing the Confederate armies back to their homes, at work on their farms and in their shops. General Sherman's Memoirs, v
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