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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

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S. W. Wilson (search for this): chapter 23
nsboroa, April 25th: 10 A. M. Hon. J. C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War: Your despatch received. We have to save the people, save the blood of the army, and save the high civil functionaries. Your plan, I think, can only do the last. We ought to prevent invasion, make terms for our troops, and give an escort of our best cavalry to the President, who ought to move without loss of a moment. Commanders believe the troops will not fight again. We think your plan impracticable. Major-General Wilson, U. S. A., has captured Macon, with Major-Generals Cobb and G. W. Smith, Brigadiers Mackall and Mercer, and the garrison. Federal papers announce capture of Mobile, with three thousand prisoners. J. E. Johnston, General. No answer was given to this. General Johnston received neither orders nor instructions from Mr. Davis after the latter's communication of the 24th of April. His memory serves him amiss if it suggests otherwise—unless General Breckinridge's telegram of the
J. F. Wheeler (search for this): chapter 23
ch a movement, although it was now, probably, too late to carry it out successfully. The position was wisely selected. Wheeler's cavalry was stationed north, and Butler's south, of the enemy's camps surrounding Goldsboroa. On the 1st of April, regard sent him Shelly's brigade, of some six hundred men, three batteries from Hillsboroa, and also ordered thither General Wheeler's cavalry, which had been sent by General Johnston to aid in the projected movement to oppose Sherman. Just at thd and now inevitable evacuation of Richmond (April 2d), which, in General Johnston's opinion, necessitated the recall of Wheeler's force, as General Sherman, altering his purpose to form a junction with General Grant, might be tempted to march at once upon Smithfield and Raleigh. Colonel J. F. Wheeler's cavalry was allowed, however, to proceed to Danville, where the Confederate Government had now determined to take temporary refuge, supposing— and indeed knowing—that General Lee, upon his ret
Washington (search for this): chapter 23
States forces to proceed with the arrangement. Jefferson Davis. Hardly had the foregoing communication been received by General Johnston, when two despatches were brought to him from General Sherman, the purport of which is clearly explained in the following telegram to the Confederate Secretary of War: Greensboroa, April 24th: 6.30 P. M. Hon. J. C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War: I have just received despatches from General Sherman informing me that instructions from Washington direct him to limit his negotiations to my command; demanding its surrender on the terms granted to General Lee, and notifying me of the termination of the truce in forty-eight hours from noon to-day. Have you any instructions? We had better disband this small force, to prevent devastation of country. J. E. Johnston, General. This news was disheartening in the extreme; and the stringent measures the Federal Government was now preparing to adopt were perhaps the result of the cal
H. H. Walker (search for this): chapter 23
ay. General Beauregard's orders to Generals Lomax, Walker, and Bradley Johnson. President Davis summons Gene defended by a mere handful of troops, under General H. H. Walker, General Beauregard sent him Shelly's brigad, April 9th, 1865. General G. T. Beauregard: General Walker, commanding here, desires your presence, in vieitions to be taken, he inquired (April 10th) of General Walker, if his presence was still necessary at Danvill to General Johnston, by way of Raleigh; one to General Walker, at Danville; and one to Governor Vance, also altered by the use of either word. junction with General Walker and others? Your more intimate knowledge of th to say that General Beauregard proposes, after General Walker shall join him, which will be ordered to commen 4. Greensboroa, N. C., April 11th, 1865. General H. H. Walker, Danville, Va.: The movements of the enemrd was now issuing direct orders to Generals Lomax, Walker, and Bradley Johnson. Five hundred men were accordi
Z. B. Vance (search for this): chapter 23
ril), after his interview with General Beauregard, sent three telegrams to General Johnston, by way of Raleigh; one to General Walker, at Danville; and one to Governor Vance, also at Raleigh. They fully indicate the state of Mr. Davis's mind at the time, and need no commentary: 1. Greensboroa, N. C., April 11th, 1865: 12 al Beauregard, on whose information the supposed necessity for your immediate action is based. Jeffn. Davis. 5. Greensboroa, N. C., April 11th, 1865. Governor Z. B. Vance, Raleigh, N. C.: I have no official report, but scouts, said to be reliable, and whose statements were circumstantial and corroborative, represent the dn the field, and thus enable us to go on with the struggle. These were very much the same views that he had previously expressed to General Beauregard and to Governor Vance, and which were also embodied in his proclamation of April 5th. Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, vol. II., p. 677. Generals Johnston and Beaureg
R. B. Thomas (search for this): chapter 23
day following this telegram, in cipher, was handed to General Beauregard: Danville, April 9th, 1865. General G. T. Beauregard: General Walker, commanding here, desires your presence, in view of the probable concentration of forces from Thomas's army against this place at a very early period, and I think your services here will be more useful than at any other point on the railroad line. Please make the greatest possible despatch in coming, as a revision of the defensive lines is desard: The President wishes you to go to Danville immediately, to talk with him of general operations. J. E. Johnston. This indicated great anxiety on the part of the President; and though he knew that the alleged danger of an attack by General Thomas's army on Danville, at that time, was purely imaginary, General Beauregard took immediate steps to obey Mr. Davis's behest. He was on the point of starting, when he received from Colonel Otey, his Adjutant-General, at Greensboroa, the news o
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 23
here He, General Cobb, had but few troops, principally local and State reserves, to oppose to them. He reported further that General Taylor confirmed the news of the Federal advance on Selma and Montgomery, and feared a movement from the Mississippi River, Memphis, and Vicksburg, through the interior of Mississippi, towards Okalona and Meridian; that a determined attack was soon to be expected on Mobile (as reported by General Maury, commanding there), from New Orleans and Pensacola, where tof the Confederacy, but appeared, nevertheless, undismayed. He said that the struggle could still be carried on to a successful issue, by bringing out all our latent resources; that if the worst came to the worst, we might, by crossing the Mississippi River, with such troops as we could retreat with, unite with Kirby Smith's army, which He estimated at some sixty thousand men, and prolong the war indefinitely. General Beauregard did not expect, and was amazed at, this evidence of visionary ho
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
le the convalescents and furloughed men, as well as all the stragglers and deserters he could reach; that he was in great need of cavalry with which to defend our communications and ascertain the movements of the enemy, all his scouts and couriers being persons too old or too young to be very efficient, who had patriotically offered their services, furnishing their own horses and equipments; that he was, however, daily expecting General Ferguson's brigade of cavalry, which was coming from Augusta, Ga., as rapidly as possible, and, in all likelihood, would reach Graham that day. General Beauregard, in his conference with the President, also told him that, from Macon, General Cobb reported that the enemy's cavalry had penetrated North Alabama, from the Tennessee River, threatening Tuscaloosa, Selma, and Montgomery; while another force of cavalry, supported by infantry and artillery, was advancing, through North Georgia, on Atlanta, Columbus, and Macon, where He, General Cobb, had but
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
Mississippi River, Memphis, and Vicksburg, through the interior of Mississippi, towards Okalona and Meridian; that a determined attack was soon to be expected on Mobile (as reported by General Maury, commanding there), from New Orleans and Pensacola, where there was a large increase of Federal troops; to oppose which General Maurlson, U. S. A., has captured Macon, with Major-Generals Cobb and G. W. Smith, Brigadiers Mackall and Mercer, and the garrison. Federal papers announce capture of Mobile, with three thousand prisoners. J. E. Johnston, General. No answer was given to this. General Johnston received neither orders nor instructions from Mr.d by them. 4. The Commanding General of the Military Division of West Mississippi, Major-General Canby, will be requested to give transportation by water, from Mobile to New Orleans, to the troops from Arkansas and Texas. 5. The obligations of officers and soldiers to be signed by their immediate commanders. 6. Naval forc
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
quent use in their industrial pursuits. Artillery horses may be used in field transportation, if necessary. 2. Each brigade or separate body to retain a number of arms equal to one-seventh of its effective strength, which, when the troops reach the capitals of their States, will be disposed of as the General commanding the Department may direct. 3. Private horses, and other private property, for both officers and men, to be retained by them. 4. The Commanding General of the Military Division of West Mississippi, Major-General Canby, will be requested to give transportation by water, from Mobile to New Orleans, to the troops from Arkansas and Texas. 5. The obligations of officers and soldiers to be signed by their immediate commanders. 6. Naval forces within the limits of General Johnston's command to be included in the terms of this convention. J. E. Johnston, Genl. Comdg. Confed. States forces in N. C. J. M. Schofield, Maj.-Genl. Comdg. United States forces in N. C.
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