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Salisbury, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
4000, then operating around Greensboroa and Salisbury, and which, though not originally belonging ach, General Beauregard left Greensboroa for Salisbury. His purpose was, if possible, to confer wiion to be made of all available troops, from Salisbury to Greensboroa. As Salisbury appeared to bestrenuously advised concentration at or near Salisbury, with a reinforcement of twenty thousand menthreatening our lines of communication, from Salisbury to Danville; and that he feared, every momenat he, General Beauregard, was collecting at Salisbury, Greensboroa, and Danville all the remnants to unite with you at the Yadkin, in front of Salisbury. And this seems to me to be the most easy mGeneral Johnston, on the Yadkin, in front of Salisbury. You will keep in communication with Generan. Five hundred men were accordingly sent to Salisbury on the 12th, and minute instructions forwarded to Greensboroa on the 19th, and thence to Salisbury, carrying with him a copy of the liberal agr[5 more...]
High Point, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
egard's immediate answer was: Will await here arrival of President. Road between this place and Danville safe. Raiders are at or near Salem. He then without delay telegraphed General Ferguson to hurry up with his cavalry brigade, from High Point, as fast as he could. The need of cavalry was greatly felt at that hour, not only to oppose the enemy, but to obtain trustworthy information. General Beauregard had mostly to depend for the latter on the scouting parties, organized by him outfety of Greensboroa. The necessity for such a movement was all the more urgent because, on the morning of that day (11th), the raiding cavalry had cut the Danville road, about twelve miles above Greensboroa, and had arrived in the afternoon at High Point and Jamestown, on the Salisbury road. The damage done, however, was not great, and could easily be repaired. Acting under the powers given him by General Lee, in his despatch of April 1st, already referred to, General Beauregard was now iss
Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
d Montgomery; while another force of cavalry, supported by infantry and artillery, was advancing, through North Georgia, on Atlanta, Columbus, and Macon, where He, General Cobb, had but few troops, principally local and State reserves, to oppose to them. He reported further that General Taylor confirmed the news of the Federal advance on Selma and Montgomery, and feared a movement from the Mississippi River, Memphis, and Vicksburg, through the interior of Mississippi, towards Okalona and Meridian; that a determined attack was soon to be expected on Mobile (as reported by General Maury, commanding there), from New Orleans and Pensacola, where there was a large increase of Federal troops; to oppose which General Maury had but an insignificant force under him. General Beauregard also said to Mr. Davis that the picture he presented to him was most gloomy, but that he thought it his duty to attempt no concealment of the truth, so that the President might have a clear knowledge of the
Shelbyville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
cient, who had patriotically offered their services, furnishing their own horses and equipments; that he was, however, daily expecting General Ferguson's brigade of cavalry, which was coming from Augusta, Ga., as rapidly as possible, and, in all likelihood, would reach Graham that day. General Beauregard, in his conference with the President, also told him that, from Macon, General Cobb reported that the enemy's cavalry had penetrated North Alabama, from the Tennessee River, threatening Tuscaloosa, Selma, and Montgomery; while another force of cavalry, supported by infantry and artillery, was advancing, through North Georgia, on Atlanta, Columbus, and Macon, where He, General Cobb, had but few troops, principally local and State reserves, to oppose to them. He reported further that General Taylor confirmed the news of the Federal advance on Selma and Montgomery, and feared a movement from the Mississippi River, Memphis, and Vicksburg, through the interior of Mississippi, towards
Selma (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ent, also told him that, from Macon, General Cobb reported that the enemy's cavalry had penetrated North Alabama, from the Tennessee River, threatening Tuscaloosa, Selma, and Montgomery; while another force of cavalry, supported by infantry and artillery, was advancing, through North Georgia, on Atlanta, Columbus, and Macon, where ad but few troops, principally local and State reserves, to oppose to them. He reported further that General Taylor confirmed the news of the Federal advance on Selma and Montgomery, and feared a movement from the Mississippi River, Memphis, and Vicksburg, through the interior of Mississippi, towards Okalona and Meridian; that athe greatest part of Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and North Carolina, and move almost at will to the east of the Mississippi. They have recently taken Selma, Montgomery, Columbus, Macon, and other important towns, depriving us of large depots of supplies and of munitions of war. Of the small force still at command many
Richard Taylor (search for this): chapter 23
rd, in his conference with the President, also told him that, from Macon, General Cobb reported that the enemy's cavalry had penetrated North Alabama, from the Tennessee River, threatening Tuscaloosa, Selma, and Montgomery; while another force of cavalry, supported by infantry and artillery, was advancing, through North Georgia, on Atlanta, Columbus, and Macon, where He, General Cobb, had but few troops, principally local and State reserves, to oppose to them. He reported further that General Taylor confirmed the news of the Federal advance on Selma and Montgomery, and feared a movement from the Mississippi River, Memphis, and Vicksburg, through the interior of Mississippi, towards Okalona and Meridian; that a determined attack was soon to be expected on Mobile (as reported by General Maury, commanding there), from New Orleans and Pensacola, where there was a large increase of Federal troops; to oppose which General Maury had but an insignificant force under him. General Beaurega
of 2258. It is easy to perceive that the error is not ours. This estimate does not include General Stoneman's force of cavalry, amounting to 4000, then operating around Greensboroa and Salisbury, anddelay, in the direction of Greensboroa, whither he returned the same evening. Soon afterwards, Stoneman appearing more directly to threaten Danville, which was then defended by a mere handful of troillsboroa, where they then lay, unsupplied with horses and of no use. The reports concerning Stoneman's raid indicated that he was moving from Wytheville, along the Virginia and Tennessee railroad,d flanks and protect his communications; that a very strong force of the enemy's cavalry,.under Stoneman, was reported to be moving along the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, having already reached Weral Grant an order to suspend the movements of any troops from the direction of Virginia. General Stoneman is under my command, and my order will suspend any devastation or destruction contemplated
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 23
ent might have a clear knowledge of the situation, and be prepared for the inevitable. President Davis lent an attentive ear to the account thus given of the hopeless condition of the Confederacy, but appeared, nevertheless, undismayed. He said that the struggle could still be carried on to a successful issue, by bringing out all our latent resources; that if the worst came to the worst, we might, by crossing the Mississippi River, with such troops as we could retreat with, unite with Kirby Smith's army, which He estimated at some sixty thousand men, and prolong the war indefinitely. General Beauregard did not expect, and was amazed at, this evidence of visionary hope on the part of the President. He admired his confidence, but inwardly condemned what to him seemed to be a total want of judgment and a misconception of the military resources of the country. The President on that day (11th April), after his interview with General Beauregard, sent three telegrams to General John
G. W. Smith (search for this): chapter 23
Your despatch received. We have to save the people, save the blood of the army, and save the high civil functionaries. Your plan, I think, can only do the last. We ought to prevent invasion, make terms for our troops, and give an escort of our best cavalry to the President, who ought to move without loss of a moment. Commanders believe the troops will not fight again. We think your plan impracticable. Major-General Wilson, U. S. A., has captured Macon, with Major-Generals Cobb and G. W. Smith, Brigadiers Mackall and Mercer, and the garrison. Federal papers announce capture of Mobile, with three thousand prisoners. J. E. Johnston, General. No answer was given to this. General Johnston received neither orders nor instructions from Mr. Davis after the latter's communication of the 24th of April. His memory serves him amiss if it suggests otherwise—unless General Breckinridge's telegram of the 25th to General Johnston can be considered as an answer from the President;
upon, April 26th. General Johnston ignorant of the whereabouts of President Davis. responsibility of concluding terms thrown upon Generals Johnston and Beauregard. President Davis's efforts to organize a cavalry escort. circular of General Johnston to his Army on April 27th.> At this stage of the military operations just described the main body of the Federal army, united at Goldsboroa, consisted of its right wing, under General Howard, aggregating 28,834 men; its left wing, under General Slocum, aggregating 28,063 men; its centre, under General Schofield, aggregating 26,392 men, exclusive of the artillery, numbering 2443 men, with 91 guns; and the cavalry division, under General Kilpatrick, with an effective strength of 5659 men; making a grand aggregate of 91,391 men. General Sherman's Memoirs, vol. II., p. 334. Our addition differs from that of General Sherman, though made up from aggregates furnished by him. He finds 88,943—a difference of 2258. It is easy to perceive
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