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January 1st (search for this): chapter 26
tter work should be, unfortunately, carried. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Appendix to chapter XXXIV. Return of Troops and Guns in the Military Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, January 1st, A. D, 1864. command.Commander.effectives.guns. Infantry.Cos. L. Artillery.Light Artillery.Cos. H. Artillery.Heavy Artillery.Cavalry.Total.Artil'ry in Position.Field Artillery.Total. 1st Mil. Dist., S. C.Brig.-Gen. Ripley3,1123 s.276151d built in Europe. Steamers at the cost of two millions each could be procured every way equal to the Monitor. Thirty millions would have got fifteen of these, which might have been enough for our purpose. Five might have been ready by the first of January last to open some one of the ports blockaded on our coast. Three of these could have been left to keep the port open, and two could have convoyed the cotton across the water, if necessary. Thus the debt could have been promptly paid with c
December 4th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 26
ll and will make terms. A few hundred men will move on and may be depended on for the object we spoke of yesterday. I would respectfully and earnestly repeat the suggestions I then made. Let me know if you desire me to adopt any other course than that proposed. If you are at Washington, or this side, I can ride forward in the morning to see you. Yours, very truly, John C. Breckinridge, Secty. of War. Appendix to chapter XLIX. War Department, C. S. A., Richmond, Va., Dec. 4th, 1864. Genl. G. T. Beauregard, Montgomery, Ala.: Your telegram of the 2d inst. is referred to me for answer. If General E. K. Smith can now act as you suggest, it would be well he should do so. You are authorized so to inform him, and to request his prompt action. He has, however, failed heretofore to respond to like necessities, and no plans should be placed Probably the word should be based, instead of placed. on his compliance. J. A. Seddon, Secty. of War. Circular. He
December 3rd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 26
c. 2d, 1864:3 P. M. Genl. S. Cooper, A. and I. G., Richmond, Va., via Tallahassee, Fla.: Telegram 30th ultimo received here, on my way to Mobile. I will repair forthwith to Atlantic coast. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Macon, Dec. 3d, 1864. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Orders from Richmond are here, extending your command to seaboard. Arrangements made for you to go either by Albany or Milledgeville, as you may desire. Howell Cobb, Major-Genl. Telegram. Columbia, T The enemy evacuated Columbia last night, and are retreating towards Nashville. Our army is moving forward. I have no difficulty about supplies, and anticipate none in the future. J. B. Hood, Genl. Telegram. Montgomery, Ala., Dec. 3d, 1864. Genl. G. T. Beauregard, Care Comdt. of Post: Following from Richmond: Nov. 30th, 1864. For the present emergency your command will extend eastward to sea-coast. Your minute knowledge of the low country will enable you to dispose of the
April 1st, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 26
rig.-Genl. Appendix to chapter XLVIII. Telegram. Smithfield, April 1st, 1865. Genl. Beauregard: Following just received from Genl. R. E. Lee: Generman. J. E. Johnston. Telegram. on Railroad from Greensboroa, April 1st, 1865. Lieut.-Genl. S. D. Lee, or Brig.-Genl. B. T. Johnson, Salisbury, N. C.: om Hillsboroa. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. High Point, N. C., April 1st, 1865. Brig.-Genl. Featherstone, Salisbury, N. C.: Enemy reported yesterday to Greensboroa. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Lexington, N. C., April 1st, 1865. Genl. J. E. Johnston, Smithfield, N. C.: On arrival at Salisbury, I fsend some there? G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. near Smithfield, April 1st, 1865. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Your despatch received. If you find Stonemanhere any troops there? G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Salisbury, April 1st, 1865. Major C. S. Stringfellow, A. A. G.: Lieutenant-Colonel G. C. Stowe re
his dead and wounded upon the field. * * * At 8 P. M. the same evening General Hagood arrived at Petersburg with the remaining seven companies of the 25th, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Pressley. After some delay in rationing the men, he moved forward to reinforce Graham. * * * Arrived at the Junction, General Hagood found General Bushrod Johnson there, who informed him that, hearing Graham's firing, he had marched to his assistance from the direction of Drury's Bluff with a brigade of 1168 Tennesseeans, and had arrived during the night. Galliard, with the 27th regiment, joined Hagood at daybreak, and raised his command to an aggregate of 1500 men. * * * About 10 A. M. General Hagood was directed to move across Ashton Creek towards the church, to feel and develop the strength and position of the enemy. * * * The skirmishers encountered the enemy's cavalry advancing, and fired upon them, driving them back. The 27th was at once deployed to the right of the road, and the skirm
December 5th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 26
Comdt. of Post: Following from Richmond: Nov. 30th, 1864. For the present emergency your command will extend eastward to sea-coast. Your minute knowledge of the low country will enable you to dispose of the forces operating against Sherman as well as those defending the coast, so as more effectually to retard the advance of Sherman and the junction of the enemy. By order of the President. —S. Cooper, A. and I. G. Geo. Wm. Brent, Col., and A. A. G. Telegram. Meridian, Dec. 5th, 1864. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: I have information, considered reliable, that the troops lately landed at Memphis have gone up the river. I will go to Corinth as soon as I can be spared. Frank Gardner, Major-Genl. Telegram. Savannah, Dec. 7th, 1864. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: If you come on to Savannah to-morrow determine what force is necessary for the defence of the C. and S. Railroad. General Jones, on plea of pressing necessity, is stopping all troops at Pocotaligo and o
April 3rd, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 26
t, 1865. Major C. S. Stringfellow, A. A. G.: Lieutenant-Colonel G. C. Stowe reports Stoneman's advance at Jonesville, Yadkin County, last night, moving in two (2) columns, one on each side of the river. Force from six to eight thousand (8000); six (6) pieces artillery. J. F. Hoke, Comdg. Telegram. Confidential. Richmond, April 2d, 1865. To Col. Otey: I do not think Richmond and Petersburg will be held by us after to-morrow. Bullock. Telegram. Salisbury, April 3d, 1865. To Genl. Beauregard: Up to yesterday at two (2) o'clock the enemy had not crossed the Yadkin River. They are moving slowly, and eastward. Estimate at four thousand (4000), and seven (7) pieces of artillery. Wm. Lee Davidson. Telegram. Danville, April 4th, 1865. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Please give me any reliable information you have as to movements of enemy, and disposition to protect the Piedmont Railroad. I have no communication from General Lee since Sunday
April 2nd, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 26
from Salisbury. Danville will probably be next point aimed at. Are there any troops there? G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Salisbury, April 1st, 1865. Major C. S. Stringfellow, A. A. G.: Lieutenant-Colonel G. C. Stowe reports Stoneman's advance at Jonesville, Yadkin County, last night, moving in two (2) columns, one on each side of the river. Force from six to eight thousand (8000); six (6) pieces artillery. J. F. Hoke, Comdg. Telegram. Confidential. Richmond, April 2d, 1865. To Col. Otey: I do not think Richmond and Petersburg will be held by us after to-morrow. Bullock. Telegram. Salisbury, April 3d, 1865. To Genl. Beauregard: Up to yesterday at two (2) o'clock the enemy had not crossed the Yadkin River. They are moving slowly, and eastward. Estimate at four thousand (4000), and seven (7) pieces of artillery. Wm. Lee Davidson. Telegram. Danville, April 4th, 1865. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Please give me any reliable
January 7th (search for this): chapter 26
Beauregard, Comdg., etc. Telegram. Richmond, Va., Jan. 7th., 1865. To Genl. Beauregard: Hardee needs aid. If Hood has not complied with your suggestion, please give the matter prompt attention. Jeffn. Davis. Macon, Ga., Jan. 7th, 1865:11 A. M. To Genl. S. Cooper, Adjt.-Genl., Richmond, Va.: General Hood reports from Corinth, Miss., January 3d, 1865, that the army recrossed Tennessee River at Bainbridge without material loss since battle of Franklin, and that it willve for military operations, and that it absolutely requires rest. He deems it of vital importance that the Trans-Mississippi troops should be furloughed by organizations for one hundred days. G. T. Beauregard. Telegram. Macon, Ga., Jan. 7th, 1865:9 A. M. To Col. Geo. Wm. Brent, A. A. G., Montgomery, Ala.: I leave this evening. Order General Hood in writing to make report of his operations from Tuscumbia to Nashville, and back to Tupelo. I have telegraphed him to same effect.
April 5th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 26
. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Am returning to army with command, by orders of General Johnston. J. Wheeler, Major-Genl. Telegram. near Smithfield, April 5th, 1865:7 A. M. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Events in Virginia will make Sherman move. Wheeler is therefore absolutely necessary here. The returning troops and Ferguson are all that can be afforded for your object, especially as we do not learn Stoneman's objective. J. E. Johnston. Telegram. Danville, April 5th, 1865. To Genl. Beauregard: Your telegram of Friday received; the reports in regard to the raiders very contradictory. Best evidence indicates that they have not been at Madison. The cavalry you have ordered here will be of special value at this time; with the infantry en route will probably serve the immediate necessity. Have sent courier to General Lee. Jefferson Davis. Telegram. Macon, April 6th, 1865. To Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Nothing certain known of movements of
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