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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865. Search the whole document.

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s the New Ironsides. the Passaic Withdraws from the fight. two more ironclads forced to retire. the Keokuk engages Fort Sumter. she is badly damaged. importance of the defeat inflicted on the enemy. the Keokuk sinks near Morris Island on the 8th. on the 12th the monitors steam, and are towed southward. condition of Sumter after the attack. exhibit of shots fired on both sides. fleet keeps outside of line of torpedoes and rope obstructions. General Beauregard's efforts to organize an e New York Herald characterized the repulse of the monitors, though almost bloodless, as one of our most discouraging disasters. The Baltimore American, denounced it as a shameful abandonment of the siege. When day dawned on the morning of the 8th, says General Ripley, in his report, the enemy's fleet was discovered in the same position as noticed on the previous evening. About nine o'clock the Keokuk, which had been evidently the most damaged in the action, went down, about three and oneh
October 15th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 5
r the new and safer position selected on that day by the attacking fleet. The following communication, forwarded, six months later, by General Beauregard to General Cooper, relative to the reasons alleged at; Washington for the failure of this grand expedition against Charleston, confirms the foregoing statement. The reader will, no doubt, read it with interest, as a part of the history of this period of the war: Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Oct. 15th, 1863. General Samuel Cooper, Adjt. and Insp.-Genl., Richmond, Va.: General,—In a published circular (No. 39) of the State Department at Washington, signed by Mr. William H. Seward, and addressed to the diplomatic agents of this Government abroad, I notice a statement relative to the defeat of the enemy's ironclad fleet in the attack on Fort Sumter, on the 7th of April last, so contrary to the facts of the case, that I feel called upon, as Commander of this Military Department, most emphat
Chapter 30: General Beauregard orders the Cummings's Point Battery to be strengthened. Citadel Cadets assigned to the New Bridge defences. the ironclads cross the bar on the 5th. Admiral Dupont makes his attack on the 7th. order in which the ships came up. their armament. Admiral Dupont's plan of battle. Fort Sumter the Chief object of attack. its reduction supposed to be inevitable. commanders of Forts Sumter and Moultrie, and the various batteries engaged. how they were armed. number of guns employed by the Confederates. cautious approach of the monitors. Fort Moultrie opens fire on them. Fort Sumter does likewise. description of the fight. Fort Sumter Cripples the New Ironsides. the Passaic Withdraws from the fight. two more ironclads forced to retire. the Keokuk engages Fort Sumter. she is badly damaged. importance of the defeat inflicted on the enemy. the Keokuk sinks near Morris Island on the 8th. on the 12th the monitors steam, and are towed
Chapter 30: General Beauregard orders the Cummings's Point Battery to be strengthened. Citadel Cadets assigned to the New Bridge defences. the ironclads cross the bar on the 5th. Admiral Dupont makes his attack on the 7th. order in which the ships came up. their armament. Admiral Dupont's plan of battle. Fort Sumter the Chief object of attack. its reduction supposed to be inevitable. commanders of Forts Sumter and Moultrie, and the various batteries engaged. how they werets premonitory signs, as reported by the Signal Corps, were—first, the increase of the enemy's force in the Stono and the North Edisto; second, the unusual activity visible among the vessels composing the fleet. In fact, during the evening of the 5th, the ironclads, including the frigate New Ironsides and eight monitors, had actually crossed the bar, and anchored in the main ship channel. Though out of range as yet, they had not before approached so near. There was but one conclusion to draw
May 24th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 5
-Colonel J. C. Simkins, and were served with great effect. Battery Wagner, under Major C. K. Huger; Cummings's Point Battery, under Lieutenant Lesesne; and Battery Beauregard, under Captain Sitgreaves, all did their duty with devotion and zeal. From Brigadier-General R. S. Ripley's official report, dated April 13th, 1863, to be found in Record of the Rebellion, vol. x. (Doc.), pp. 520-522. General Beauregard, in his official communication to the War Department, dated Charleston, May 24th, 1863, recapitulates as follows the salient features of Admiral Dupont's attack: The action lasted two hours and twenty-five minutes; but the chief damage is reported by the enemy to have been done in thirty minutes. The Keokuk did not come nearer than nine hundred yards of Fort Sumter. She was destroyed. The New Ironsides could not stand the fire at the range of a mile. Four of her consorts, monitors, were disabled at the distance of not less than thirteen hundred yards. They had only
n that, thirty minutes after the action commenced, Admiral Dupont became convinced of the utter impracticability of taking the city of Charleston with the force under his command, and that all his officers were of a like opinion. He had even declared that a renewal of the attack on Charleston would be attended with disastrous results, involving the loss of this (the South Carolina) coast. The reports of Admiral Dupont and of his officers accompanying Secretary Welles's Report for the year 1863, appear, in substance, in the second volume of Boynton The revulsion of feeling in the North was complete, and exaggerated hope was changed into despondency, openly expressed. The New York Herald characterized the repulse of the monitors, though almost bloodless, as one of our most discouraging disasters. The Baltimore American, denounced it as a shameful abandonment of the siege. When day dawned on the morning of the 8th, says General Ripley, in his report, the enemy's fleet was discov
April 4th (search for this): chapter 5
attack on the monitors with torpedo-boats. his letter to Lieutenant Webb, C. S. N. his plan foiled by the withdrawal of the fleet. letter to General Cooper. failure to complete torpedo-rams and gunboats.> Being still apprehensive that the enemy's monitors might take a position in main ship channel, as near the shore as prudence would admit, and attempt to batter down the southeast angle and gorge-wall of Fort Sumter—for that was its most vulnerable part —General Beauregard, on the 4th of April, ordered the Commander of the First Military District to add a 10-inch columbiad, or a 42-pounder rifled gun, to the Cummings's Point Battery, the object being to keep the Federal ironclads as far off as possible and, at the same time, increase the efficiency of that important work. The sequel proved the wisdom of this precaution. The day following, the Commanders of the First District and of James Island were given specific instructions as to the reinforcements, and guns and mortars
April 7th (search for this): chapter 5
one conclusion to draw: the long-delayed and anxiously expected attack was now about to take place. At last, on the 7th of April, a little after 2 P M., the monitors advanced for action. It was with a feeling akin to relief that officers and men abroad, I notice a statement relative to the defeat of the enemy's ironclad fleet in the attack on Fort Sumter, on the 7th of April last, so contrary to the facts of the case, that I feel called upon, as Commander of this Military Department, most emphatically to deny the truth of that version, which is as follows: An attack by the fleet, on the 7th of April last, upon the forts and batteries which defend the harbor (of Charleston) failed because the rope obstructions in the channel fouled the sion Record, vol. x., p. 520 (Doc.). The following is an exhibit of the number of rounds fired by the enemy on the 7th of April, and the number of shots received by each ironclad, as copied from United States journals: Roads Fired. New Ironsi
April 13th, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 5
fficers and soldiers, upheld the historic reputation of that fort, and contributed their full share to the result. The powerful batteries of Battery Bee were commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel J. C. Simkins, and were served with great effect. Battery Wagner, under Major C. K. Huger; Cummings's Point Battery, under Lieutenant Lesesne; and Battery Beauregard, under Captain Sitgreaves, all did their duty with devotion and zeal. From Brigadier-General R. S. Ripley's official report, dated April 13th, 1863, to be found in Record of the Rebellion, vol. x. (Doc.), pp. 520-522. General Beauregard, in his official communication to the War Department, dated Charleston, May 24th, 1863, recapitulates as follows the salient features of Admiral Dupont's attack: The action lasted two hours and twenty-five minutes; but the chief damage is reported by the enemy to have been done in thirty minutes. The Keokuk did not come nearer than nine hundred yards of Fort Sumter. She was destroyed. The
April 12th (search for this): chapter 5
nce, not one of the enemy's monitors, so much boasted of by them, would live to see the next morning's sun. Please submit this letter to Captain Tucker, and assure him that whatever assistance I can give for this expedition, the success of which must contribute so materially to the safety of this city, will be freely and heartily furnished. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. But, as ill-luck would have it, says General Beauregard, the very night (April 12th) on which the attack was to have been made some of the monitors were sent to Port Royal for repairs, and the others to the North Edisto. The Ironsides was still with the blockaders, however, and, as General Beauregard looked upon her as our most dangerous antagonist, he determined to strike her a blow—destroy her, if possible—and so raise the blockade, on that occasion, as to forbid all denial of the fact. Captain Tucker was again ready to execute General Beauregard's plan, which had ass
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