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Cumming's Point (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ironclads as a part of them. If you permit me I will give you here my general views upon the expedition. About dark, on the first calm night (the sooner the better), I would rendezvous all my boats at the mouth of the creek, in rear of Cummings's Point, Morris Island. There I would await the proper hours of the night, which should not be too late, in order to take advantage of the present condition of the moon. I would then coast quietly along the beach of Morris Island to a point neares on secret expedition, or merely Contrabands. After the attack each boat should make for the nearest point of the shore, where, if necessary, to save itself from pursuit, it can be stranded; otherwise, it will return to the rendezvous at Cummings's Point. Care should be taken to have a proper understanding with commanding officers of the batteries in that vicinity, so as not to be fired into. I feel convinced that, with nerve and proper precautions on the part of your boats' crews, and w
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ortant work. The sequel proved the wisdom of this precaution. The day following, the Commanders of the First District and of James Island were given specific instructions as to the reinforcements, and guns and mortars were called for and received from Georgia. The Citadel Cadets, of Charleston, were anxious to take part in their country's defence, and their services having been accepted, they were assigned to the works protecting the New Bridge, on the Ashley River. The 2500 men from Savannah had arrived, and the Chief of Subsistence was ordered to make proper provision for them. The storm was evidently approaching. Its premonitory signs, as reported by the Signal Corps, were—first, the increase of the enemy's force in the Stono and the North Edisto; second, the unusual activity visible among the vessels composing the fleet. In fact, during the evening of the 5th, the ironclads, including the frigate New Ironsides and eight monitors, had actually crossed the bar, and anchor
Nantucket (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ame up in the following order: four monitors—the Weehawken, the Passaic, the Montauk, the Pa-tapsco; then the New Ironsides, as flag-ship; then the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Nahant, and, bringing up the rear, the doubleturreted monitor Keokuk. They were commanded by experienced and gallant officers of the United States Navy. TApril, and the number of shots received by each ironclad, as copied from United States journals: Roads Fired. New Ironsides8 Catskill25 Keokuk3 Montauk26 Nantucket15 Passaic9 Nahant24 Weekawken26 Patapsco18 —— Total154 Shots Rec'd. New Ironsides65 Keokuk90 Weehawken60 Montauk20 Passaic58 Nantucket51 CatskillNantucket51 Catskill51 Patapsco45 Nahant80 —— Total520 Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. This was the real cause—there existed no other—of Admiral Dupont's failure to carry out his programme against Fort Sumter and the other defensive works in Charleston Harbor. The torpedoes and the rope obstructions, so much spoken of, had nothing wh
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Contrabands. After the attack each boat should make for the nearest point of the shore, where, if necessary, to save itself from pursuit, it can be stranded; otherwise, it will return to the rendezvous at Cummings's Point. Care should be taken to have a proper understanding with commanding officers of the batteries in that vicinity, so as not to be fired into. I feel convinced that, with nerve and proper precautions on the part of your boats' crews, and with he protection of a kind Providence, not one of the enemy's monitors, so much boasted of by them, would live to see the next morning's sun. Please submit this letter to Captain Tucker, and assure him that whatever assistance I can give for this expedition, the success of which must contribute so materially to the safety of this city, will be freely and heartily furnished. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. But, as ill-luck would have it, says General Beauregard, the very night (Apr
Palmetto (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
g-delayed and anxiously expected attack was now about to take place. At last, on the 7th of April, a little after 2 P M., the monitors advanced for action. It was with a feeling akin to relief that officers and men stepped into their positions, at the different batteries and pieces assigned them. The long roll was beaten. There would have been loud cheering, had not discipline and strict orders prevented. By order of the Commandant at Sumter three flags, the garrison, regimental, and Palmetto flags, were hoisted; the band played Dixie, and thirteen guns were fired, to salute the ensigns that floated high in the air, as if to say, We are ready! Admiral Dupont's ships came up in the following order: four monitors—the Weehawken, the Passaic, the Montauk, the Pa-tapsco; then the New Ironsides, as flag-ship; then the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Nahant, and, bringing up the rear, the doubleturreted monitor Keokuk. They were commanded by experienced and gallant officers of the Uni
Ashley River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ease the efficiency of that important work. The sequel proved the wisdom of this precaution. The day following, the Commanders of the First District and of James Island were given specific instructions as to the reinforcements, and guns and mortars were called for and received from Georgia. The Citadel Cadets, of Charleston, were anxious to take part in their country's defence, and their services having been accepted, they were assigned to the works protecting the New Bridge, on the Ashley River. The 2500 men from Savannah had arrived, and the Chief of Subsistence was ordered to make proper provision for them. The storm was evidently approaching. Its premonitory signs, as reported by the Signal Corps, were—first, the increase of the enemy's force in the Stono and the North Edisto; second, the unusual activity visible among the vessels composing the fleet. In fact, during the evening of the 5th, the ironclads, including the frigate New Ironsides and eight monitors, had actua
Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
rial injury, for one of the number, the Keokuk, was sunk, and its armament is now in position for the defence of Charleston in our own batteries. Another monitor had to be sent to New York for extensive repairs, and several others were sent to Port Royal, also for repairs. 4th. Not a life may have been lost in the ironclads, but, on examination of the wreck of the Keokuk, its hull was found penetrated, and the 11-inch round-shots and 7-inch rifled bolts had made clean holes through its turrnished. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. But, as ill-luck would have it, says General Beauregard, the very night (April 12th) on which the attack was to have been made some of the monitors were sent to Port Royal for repairs, and the others to the North Edisto. The Ironsides was still with the blockaders, however, and, as General Beauregard looked upon her as our most dangerous antagonist, he determined to strike her a blow—destroy her, if possible—and
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
nfederates. cautious approach of the monitors. Fort Moultrie opens fire on them. Fort Sumter does likewise. four guns and mortars. Next in importance was Fort Moultrie, under Colonel William Butler, assisted by Major companies, one from Fort Sumter, the other from Fort Moultrie. The first was commanded by Lieutenant W. E. Er first shot on the assaulting squadron came from Fort Moultrie. The vessel fired at kept on her course until se minutes, and then replied, firing by battery. Fort Moultrie and batteries Bee and Beauregard did likewise. upon it, and only sending an occasional shot at Fort Moultrie and batteries Bee and Beauregard. It was a grans report, says: It is due to the garrison of Fort Moultrie and their soldierly and accomplished commander, ing principally to the repulse. The garrison of Fort Moultrie, under Colonel William Butler, seconded by Major convenient for accuracy or celerity of fire. Fort Moultrie and other batteries were not touched in a way to
Catskill (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
pont's ships came up in the following order: four monitors—the Weehawken, the Passaic, the Montauk, the Pa-tapsco; then the New Ironsides, as flag-ship; then the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Nahant, and, bringing up the rear, the doubleturreted monitor Keokuk. They were commanded by experienced and gallant officers of the United ired by the enemy on the 7th of April, and the number of shots received by each ironclad, as copied from United States journals: Roads Fired. New Ironsides8 Catskill25 Keokuk3 Montauk26 Nantucket15 Passaic9 Nahant24 Weekawken26 Patapsco18 —— Total154 Shots Rec'd. New Ironsides65 Keokuk90 Weehawken60 Montauk20 Passaic58 Nantucket51 Catskill51 Patapsco45 Nahant80 —— Total520 Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. This was the real cause—there existed no other—of Admiral Dupont's failure to carry out his programme against Fort Sumter and the other defensive works in Charleston Harbor. The torpedoes and the rope obstructions,
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
, and Charleston likewise. Sharing in this belief, the Federal Government was convinced that the fears of Mr. Adams, United States Minister to England, to the effect that the current of opinion, in both Houses of Parliament, was then leaning towards recognition of the insurgents, would be quieted by such a victory, and the power, authority, and resources of the United States clearly demonstrated to the world. Hence the disappointment at the repulse of Admiral Dupont's fleet. The Northern prr of rounds fired by the enemy on the 7th of April, and the number of shots received by each ironclad, as copied from United States journals: Roads Fired. New Ironsides8 Catskill25 Keokuk3 Montauk26 Nantucket15 Passaic9 Nahant24 Weekawkeneat value of the invention has been demonstrated so as to secure general conviction; and Captain Tucker, commanding Confederate States naval forces afloat on this station, declares, unhesitatingly, that this one machine of war, if finished, would be
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