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er Lieutenant Lesesne; and Battery Beauregard, under Captain Sitgreaves, all did their duty with devotion and zeal. From Brigadier-General R. S. Ripley's official report, dated April 13th, 1863, to be found in Record of the Rebellion, vol. x. (Doc.), pp. 520-522. General Beauregard, in his official communication to the War Department, dated Charleston, May 24th, 1863, recapitulates as follows the salient features of Admiral Dupont's attack: The action lasted two hours and twenty-fivlaces, the walls and parapets of the work. The effect of impact of the heavy shot sent by the enemy against the fort * * * was found to have been much less than had been anticipated. General Ripley's report, Rebellion Record, vol. x., p. 520 (Doc.). The following is an exhibit of the number of rounds fired by the enemy on the 7th of April, and the number of shots received by each ironclad, as copied from United States journals: Roads Fired. New Ironsides8 Catskill25 Keokuk3 Mont
Warren Adams (search for this): chapter 5
unders, and two 10-inch mortars—in all, twenty-one guns and mortars. Battery Bee, on Sullivan's Island, was under Lieutenant-Colonel J. C. Simkins, with three companies of the 1st South Carolina Infantry (Regulars), Captains R. de Treville, Warren Adams, and W. Tabourn. The guns it used against the fleet were five 10-inch and one 8-inch columbiad—six guns. Battery Beauregard was under Captain J. A. Sitgreaves, 1st South Carolina Artillery (Regulars), with two companies, one from Fort Sumtthe country. It was the conviction of the North that no opposing force could resist such an expedition. Fort Sumter must inevitably fall, and Charleston likewise. Sharing in this belief, the Federal Government was convinced that the fears of Mr. Adams, United States Minister to England, to the effect that the current of opinion, in both Houses of Parliament, was then leaning towards recognition of the insurgents, would be quieted by such a victory, and the power, authority, and resources of
ours. it is probable the next point of attack will be the batteries on Morris Island. * * * F. S. Dupont, Rear-Admiral, Comdg. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. From the order given above it is manifest that there was not only hope, but a fey of bloody clothes and blankets, were found on board. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. At three o'clock P. M., and as soon as the leading ironclad had apparently come within range, the Commander at Mosafety of this city, will be freely and heartily furnished. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. But, as ill-luck would have it, says General Beauregard, the very night (April 12th) on which the attack was to h completion of the ram, I may as well give up further hope. Respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, Genl. Comdg. But all efforts were unavailing. The War Department, no less than the Navy Department, remained, in appearance,
Alfred Rhett (search for this): chapter 5
re engaged against the fleet. First among them was Fort Sumter, under Colonel Alfred Rhett, with Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Yates, commanding the parapet guns, and Md reports of Brigadier-General R. S. Ripley, Colonel William Butler, and Colonel Alfred Rhett, who commanded at that period respectively this Military District, the b of Sumter, when she opened upon it with two guns, but without any result. Colonel Rhett, on the parapet, waited some two or three minutes, and then replied, firing worsted, and unable to endure the ordeal to which she had been subjected. Colonel Rhett thus refers to this incident in his official report: She received our uattle was fought. The day was ours. In his report, already referred to, Colonel Rhett says: The enemy's fire was mostly ricochet, and not very accurate; mostobject of the attack, and to that garrison, under its gallant commander, Colonel Alfred Rhett, ably seconded by Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Yates and Major Ormsby Blandi
J. R. Macbeth (search for this): chapter 5
and expensively prepared by the North, for the capture of Charleston. We mention only those that were engaged against the fleet. First among them was Fort Sumter, under Colonel Alfred Rhett, with Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Yates, commanding the parapet guns, and Major Ormsby Blanding, in charge of the casemate batteries. The garrison consisted of seven companies of the First South Carolina Artillery (Regulars), under Captains D. G. Fleming, F. H. Harleston, J. C. King, J. C. Mitchel, J. R. Macbeth, W. H. Peronneau, and C. W. Parker. The guns brought into action were: two 7-inch Brookes, four 10-inch columbiads, two 9-inch Dahlgrens, four 8-inch columbiads, four 8-inch navy guns, seven banded and rifled 42-pounders, one banded and rifled 32-pounder, thirteen smooth-bore 32-pounders, and seven 10-inch sea-coast mortars—in all, forty-four guns and mortars. Next in importance was Fort Moultrie, under Colonel William Butler, assisted by Major T. M. Baker, with five companies of th
William Butler (search for this): chapter 5
ven 10-inch sea-coast mortars—in all, forty-four guns and mortars. Next in importance was Fort Moultrie, under Colonel William Butler, assisted by Major T. M. Baker, with five companies of the 1st South Carolina Infantry (Regulars), commanded by Cmpunity. Not a life was lost on board a monitor. From the enclosed reports of Brigadier-General R. S. Ripley, Colonel William Butler, and Colonel Alfred Rhett, who commanded at that period respectively this Military District, the batteries on Sul, in his report, says: It is due to the garrison of Fort Moultrie and their soldierly and accomplished commander, Colonel Butler, that I should not close this report without bearing testimony to the admirable skill, coolness, and deliberation wiand, with their powerful armament, contributing principally to the repulse. The garrison of Fort Moultrie, under Colonel William Butler, seconded by Major Baker and the other officers and soldiers, upheld the historic reputation of that fort, and co
R. S. Ripley (search for this): chapter 5
o the scene of action, and take part in it, if necessary. Brigadier-General Ripley, whose command included the three subdivisions just referrost on board a monitor. From the enclosed reports of Brigadier-General R. S. Ripley, Colonel William Butler, and Colonel Alfred Rhett, who thanks and gratitude of their commander and their country. General Ripley confirmed the above in the following words: The action was ves, all did their duty with devotion and zeal. From Brigadier-General R. S. Ripley's official report, dated April 13th, 1863, to be found f the siege. When day dawned on the morning of the 8th, says General Ripley, in his report, the enemy's fleet was discovered in the same po was found to have been much less than had been anticipated. General Ripley's report, Rebellion Record, vol. x., p. 520 (Doc.). The fos Island to a point nearest the enemy's present position, where General Ripley shall station a picket, to communicate with you, and to show pr
Joseph A. Yates (search for this): chapter 5
pture of Charleston. We mention only those that were engaged against the fleet. First among them was Fort Sumter, under Colonel Alfred Rhett, with Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Yates, commanding the parapet guns, and Major Ormsby Blanding, in charge of the casemate batteries. The garrison consisted of seven companies of the First o play. Fort Sumter was the principal object of the attack, and to that garrison, under its gallant commander, Colonel Alfred Rhett, ably seconded by Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Yates and Major Ormsby Blanding, and all the officers and men, special credit is due for sustaining the shock, and, with their powerful armament, contributiis considered. This precision was due, not only to the discipline and practice of the garrisons engaged, but in no slight degree to an invention of Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph A. Yates, 1st Regiment South Carolina Artillery, which had been applied to many of our best guns, and which shall, as fast as possible, be arranged for all t
Housatonic (search for this): chapter 5
wken, the Passaic, the Montauk, the Pa-tapsco; then the New Ironsides, as flag-ship; then the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Nahant, and, bringing up the rear, the doubleturreted monitor Keokuk. They were commanded by experienced and gallant officers of the United States Navy. Their armament, including that of the New Ironsides, consisted of thirtythree guns of the heaviest calibre ever used in war, to wit, 15 and 11 inch Dahlgren guns, and 8-inch rifled pieces. The steam-ers Canandaigua, Housatonic, Unadilla, Wissahickon, and Huron constituted the reserve, and were kept outside the bar. It may be of interest to submit an extract from the plan of attack and order of battle, adopted by the Admiral and distributed to the various commandants who took part in the engagement: * * * The squadron will pass up the main ship channel without returning the fire of the batteries on Morris Island, unless signal should be made to commence action. The ships will open fire on Fort Sumter
member of Admiral Dahlgren's staff in a work, well written and, as a whole, remarkably fair, entitled Leaves from a Lawyer's Life, Afloat and Ashore. Charles Cowley, late Judge-Advocate of the South Atlantic blockading squadron. A And it is but fair to add that this statement is entirely correct. Captain P. A. Mitchell, with a few companies from the 20th South Carolina Infantry, had been placed on Sullivan's Island, to prevent an assault by land, should any be attempted; and Lieutenant-Colonel Dargan, of the 21st South Carolina, had been charged with the same duty on Morris Island. General Beauregard had also requested Commodore Ingraham to join in the movement, with the two gunboat-rams Palmetto State and Chicora, should circumstances allow it. The Commodore and Commanders Tucker and Rutledge readily prepared to do so, and took up their position accordingly. Neither vessel, however, participated in the engagement. Sullivan's Island, constituting the second subdivision o
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