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Unadilla, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
assaic, the Montauk, the Pa-tapsco; then the New Ironsides, as flag-ship; then the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Nahant, and, bringing up the rear, the doubleturreted monitor Keokuk. They were commanded by experienced and gallant officers of the United States Navy. Their armament, including that of the New Ironsides, consisted of thirtythree guns of the heaviest calibre ever used in war, to wit, 15 and 11 inch Dahlgren guns, and 8-inch rifled pieces. The steam-ers Canandaigua, Housatonic, Unadilla, Wissahickon, and Huron constituted the reserve, and were kept outside the bar. It may be of interest to submit an extract from the plan of attack and order of battle, adopted by the Admiral and distributed to the various commandants who took part in the engagement: * * * The squadron will pass up the main ship channel without returning the fire of the batteries on Morris Island, unless signal should be made to commence action. The ships will open fire on Fort Sumter when withi
Canandaigua (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
rs—the Weehawken, the Passaic, the Montauk, the Pa-tapsco; then the New Ironsides, as flag-ship; then the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Nahant, and, bringing up the rear, the doubleturreted monitor Keokuk. They were commanded by experienced and gallant officers of the United States Navy. Their armament, including that of the New Ironsides, consisted of thirtythree guns of the heaviest calibre ever used in war, to wit, 15 and 11 inch Dahlgren guns, and 8-inch rifled pieces. The steam-ers Canandaigua, Housatonic, Unadilla, Wissahickon, and Huron constituted the reserve, and were kept outside the bar. It may be of interest to submit an extract from the plan of attack and order of battle, adopted by the Admiral and distributed to the various commandants who took part in the engagement: * * * The squadron will pass up the main ship channel without returning the fire of the batteries on Morris Island, unless signal should be made to commence action. The ships will open fire o
Three Trees (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
strict of South Carolina, was, at that time, under Brigadier-General J. H. Trapier, lately withdrawn from Georgetown for that purpose by order of General Beauregard. Colonel Lawrence M. Keitt was the Commandant of the post, and had stationed himself at Battery Bee, where he remained during the fight. Morris Island, the third subdivision, was under Colonel R. F. Graham. Brigadier-General Gist had charge of the first subdivision, composed of James Island and St. Andrew's Parish. He was at Fort Johnson, with his staff, in order to be as near as possible to the scene of action, and take part in it, if necessary. Brigadier-General Ripley, whose command included the three subdivisions just referred to, had selected the recognized post of danger —Fort Sumter—for his headquarters during the engagement. He was in Charleston, however, at the beginning of the attack; and when, a few minutes later, he hurried off, with the declared intention of going to the fort, the concentration of fire agai
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
h soldierly condition into which those garrisons had been brought by their officers. My expectations were fully realized; and the country, as well as the State of South Carolina, may well be proud of the men who first met and vanquished the iron-mailed, terriblyarmed armada, so confidently prepared, and sent forth by the enemy to of a like opinion. He had even declared that a renewal of the attack on Charleston would be attended with disastrous results, involving the loss of this (the South Carolina) coast. The reports of Admiral Dupont and of his officers accompanying Secretary Welles's Report for the year 1863, appear, in substance, in the second vols: * * * It will be remembered that the work was undertaken with the understanding that the sum of fifty thousand dollars would be supplied by the State of South Carolina, and such material as the Navy Department had available. The money has been received, and is exhausted. Some materials have been furnished by the Navy D
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ing to keep the Federal ironclads as far off as possible and, at the same time, increase the efficiency of that important work. The sequel proved the wisdom of this precaution. The day following, the Commanders of the First District and of James Island were given specific instructions as to the reinforcements, and guns and mortars were called for and received from Georgia. The Citadel Cadets, of Charleston, were anxious to take part in their country's defence, and their services having beenommandant of the post, and had stationed himself at Battery Bee, where he remained during the fight. Morris Island, the third subdivision, was under Colonel R. F. Graham. Brigadier-General Gist had charge of the first subdivision, composed of James Island and St. Andrew's Parish. He was at Fort Johnson, with his staff, in order to be as near as possible to the scene of action, and take part in it, if necessary. Brigadier-General Ripley, whose command included the three subdivisions just refer
Keokuk, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ht. two more ironclads forced to retire. the Keokuk engages Fort Sumter. she is badly damaged. ince of the defeat inflicted on the enemy. the Keokuk sinks near Morris Island on the 8th. on the 1dred yards of the outer batteries, except the Keokuk, which came up to about nine hundred yards, anut material injury, for one of the number, the Keokuk, was sunk, and its armament is now in positionclads, but, on examination of the wreck of the Keokuk, its hull was found penetrated, and the 11-incenemy to have been done in thirty minutes. The Keokuk did not come nearer than nine hundred yards ofre ascribed to the New Ironsides, three to the Keokuk, and but nine to the Passaic, which was so bad the previous evening. About nine o'clock the Keokuk, which had been evidently the most damaged in : Roads Fired. New Ironsides8 Catskill25 Keokuk3 Montauk26 Nantucket15 Passaic9 Nahant24 cking fleet adopted the course followed by the Keokuk, and steered nearer to the walls of Sumter, in[3 more...]
Weehawken (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
igh in the air, as if to say, We are ready! Admiral Dupont's ships came up in the following order: four monitors—the Weehawken, the Passaic, the Montauk, the Pa-tapsco; then the New Ironsides, as flag-ship; then the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Nich they must steer their way. It was said by Northern correspondents, and officially repeated by Mr. Seward, that the Weehawken, their leading vessel, at the outset fell into these entanglements, and that the others, fearing a like mishap, sheeredr reached the Confederate line of obstructions. Another cause must, therefore, be assigned for the slow advance of the Weehawken, and for the new and safer position selected on that day by the attacking fleet. The following communication, forwardek26 Nantucket15 Passaic9 Nahant24 Weekawken26 Patapsco18 —— Total154 Shots Rec'd. New Ironsides65 Keokuk90 Weehawken60 Montauk20 Passaic58 Nantucket51 Catskill51 Patapsco45 Nahant80 —— Total520 Thomas Jordan, Chief of Sta
Nahant (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
following order: four monitors—the Weehawken, the Passaic, the Montauk, the Pa-tapsco; then the New Ironsides, as flag-ship; then the Catskill, the Nantucket, the Nahant, and, bringing up the rear, the doubleturreted monitor Keokuk. They were commanded by experienced and gallant officers of the United States Navy. Their armamentof shots received by each ironclad, as copied from United States journals: Roads Fired. New Ironsides8 Catskill25 Keokuk3 Montauk26 Nantucket15 Passaic9 Nahant24 Weekawken26 Patapsco18 —— Total154 Shots Rec'd. New Ironsides65 Keokuk90 Weehawken60 Montauk20 Passaic58 Nantucket51 Catskill51 Patapsco45 NahanNahant80 —— Total520 Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. This was the real cause—there existed no other—of Admiral Dupont's failure to carry out his programme against Fort Sumter and the other defensive works in Charleston Harbor. The torpedoes and the rope obstructions, so much spoken of, had nothing whatever to do with it
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
nited States journals: Roads Fired. New Ironsides8 Catskill25 Keokuk3 Montauk26 Nantucket15 Passaic9 Nahant24 Weekawken26 Patapsco18 —— Total154 Shots Rec'd. New Ironsides65 Keokuk90 Weehawken60 Montauk20 Passaic58 Nantucket51 Catskill51 Patapsco45 Nahant80 —— Total520 Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. This was the real cause—there existed no other—of Admiral Dupont's failure to carry out his programme against Fort Sumter and the other defensive works in Charleston Harbor. The torpedoes and the rope obstructions, so much spoken of, had nothing whatever to do with it; though we readily admit that the enemy's evident and just dread of torpedoes, as evinced in his preparations for their explosion by the Devil, or torpedo-searcher, Report of Major Harris, Chief-Engineer. See Appendix. was no insignificant factor in his unwillingness to engage the Confederate batteries at closer quarters. It only remains to be said, however, that, had all the iro
Passaic, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
iption of the fight. Fort Sumter Cripples the New Ironsides. the Passaic Withdraws from the fight. two more ironclads forced to retire. ts came up in the following order: four monitors—the Weehawken, the Passaic, the Montauk, the Pa-tapsco; then the New Ironsides, as flag-ship; hurried manner in which she withdrew out of effective range. The Passaic had already left the contest, visibly crippled; and the other monierists. Two of these vessels were now compelled to retire, as the Passaic and the Ironsides had previously done. At five minutes past foubed to the New Ironsides, three to the Keokuk, and but nine to the Passaic, which was so badly damaged. Not more than thirty-four shots tookred. New Ironsides8 Catskill25 Keokuk3 Montauk26 Nantucket15 Passaic9 Nahant24 Weekawken26 Patapsco18 —— Total154 Shots Rec'd. New Ironsides65 Keokuk90 Weehawken60 Montauk20 Passaic58 Nantucket51 Catskill51 Patapsco45 Nahant80 —— Total520 Thomas Jord
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