hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 6 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 4 4 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 3 3 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 3 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 3 3 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 3 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight). You can also browse the collection for 1804 AD or search for 1804 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
ans burned the Turkish fleet in the port of Tchesme, and destroyed the fortifications by the shock of the explosion. In 1804 the loaded catamarans of Fulton were used by the English against the French fleet off Boulogne. But little damage was done. The experiments were repeated again and again against Le Forte Rouge at Calais, 1804 (Fulton blew up the brig Dorothea in Walmer Roads, October, 1805. See Fulton's Torpedo war, and Torpedoes, their invention and use, by W. R. King, U. S. A., 1d. A tunnel under the Thames, to connect Gravesend with the Essex side, was projected by Ralph Dodd, Esq., in 1798. In 1804, Mr. Chapman proposed to tunnel below the river from Rotherhithe to the north bank. In 1807 the work was actually commencr-body. Twin-screws were used upon the earliest practical propeller steamboat, that of Colonel John Stevens of Hoboken, 1804. See screw-propeller, page 2071, Fig. 4747. Twin-screws are used also upon some of the Winan's cigarsteamers, the thir
60°, and the upper of about 80°, with the axis, the concavity facing the wind. The breadth of the sails is usually about 1/5 or 1/6 of the length, which varies from 30 to 40 feet, and they are preferably widened toward their outer extremities. Their maximum effect is attained when their outer ends revolve with about 2 1/2 times the velocity of the wind. In 1772 Andrew Meikle, of Scotland, invented a plan for automatically adjusting the area of the sails to the force of the wind; and in 1804, By water of Nottingham, England, patented a method of rolling up the sails to adjust them in like manner, by means of a weighted lever, which was caused to operate gears, connected by cords to cylinders, on which the sails were wound. More recent devices of this kind generally aim to effect this adjustment by altering the angle at which the sails are presented to the wind. In some cases the axis on which the sails rotate is caused to fall in the line of direction of the wind by means o
1 2