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Rheims (France) (search for this): chapter 15
e Greek model at Aquisgrana, the modern Aix-la-Chapelle. Several German organs were placed in Italian churches by John VIII., 872-882. About 951, the abbey of Malmesbury and the cathedral of Winchester in England were provided with organs. At this time and for two centuries later, the compass was small, usually from 9 to 11 notes, the brass pipes harsh in tone and the machinery clumsy; the keys being 4 or 5 inches broad, and struck by the fist. Gerbert of Auvergne, in his school at Rheims, had an organ played by steam. He was afterward made Pope by the Emperor Otho III., assuming the name of Sylvester II. He and his patron were poisoned by Italian intriguers about 1002. Gerbert introduced the Arabic numerals into Europe. The organ of Winchester, probably placed there by St. Dunstan, had 26 pairs of bellows, 400 pipes, and required 70 men to work it. The key-board is distinctly described at the close of the eleventh century. At this time a number of small bellows, 20
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 15
eile9,781 MaltaCanna2.29 MecklenburgMeile8,238 MexicoLegua4,638 MilanMigliio1,093.63 MochaMile2,146 NaplesMiglio2,025 NetherlandsMijle1,093.63 Place.Measure.U. S. Yards. NorwayMile12,182 PersiaParasang6,076 PolandMile (long)8,100 PortugalMitha2,250 PortugalVara3.609 PrussiaMile (post)8,238 RomeKilometre1,093.63 RomeMile2,025 RussiaVerst1,166.7 RussiaSashine2.33 SardiniaMiglio2,435 SaxonyMeile (post)7,432 SiamRoenung4,333 SpainLeague legal4,638 SpainLeague, common6,026.PortugalVara3.609 PrussiaMile (post)8,238 RomeKilometre1,093.63 RomeMile2,025 RussiaVerst1,166.7 RussiaSashine2.33 SardiniaMiglio2,435 SaxonyMeile (post)7,432 SiamRoenung4,333 SpainLeague legal4,638 SpainLeague, common6,026.24 SpainMilla1,522 SwedenMile11,660 SwitzerlandMeile8,548 TurkeyBerri1,828 TuscanyMiglio1,809 VeniceMiglio1,900 O-don′ta-gra. A form of dental forceps. O-don′to-graph. (Gearing.) An instrument for marking or laying off the teeth of gear-wheels; invented by Professor Willis. It consists of a graduated card or thin board, having one edge beveled at an angle of 75°. This is applied to the radii terminating at the centers of the interspaces between the teeth and the centers fro
Dresden (Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 15
the driver with eight kilometers (about five miles) an hour, or two francs, according to the Parisian tariff. Table of Lengths of Foreign Road Measures. Place.Measure.U. S. Yards. ArabiaMile2,146 AustriaMeile (post)8,297 BadenStuden4,860 BelgiumKilometre1,093.63 BelgiumMeile2,132 BengalCoss2,000 BirmahDain4,277 BohemiaLeague (16 to 1°)7,587 BrazilLeague (18 to 1°)6,750 BremenMeile6,865 BrunswickMeile11,816 CalcuttaCoss2,160 CeylonMile1,760 ChinaLi608.5 DenmarkMul8,288 DresdenPost-meile7,432 EgyptFeddan1.47 EnglandMile1,760 FlandersMijle1,093.63 FlorenceMiglio1,809 France 1, 60931 miles = 1 kilometre. Kilometre1,093.6 GenoaMile (post)8,527 GermanyMile (15 to 1°)8,101 GreeceStadium1,083.33 GuineaJacktan4 HamburgMeile8,238 HanoverMeile8,114 HungaryMeile9,139 IndiaWarsa24.89 ItalyMile2,025 JapanInk2.038 LeghornMiglio1,809 LeipsieMeile (post)7,432 LithuaniaMeile9,781 MaltaCanna2.29 MecklenburgMeile8,238 MexicoLegua4,638 MilanMigliio1,093.6
Orange, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
assAndropogon citratumIndiaA delicious essential oil. LemonCitrus limonumWarm climatesThe rind affords an oil used in perfumery, flavoring, etc. NeroliCitrus (various)EuropePerfumed oil obtained from various species of the orange family. Affords the orange-flower water of the shops, etc. NutmegMyristica moschataMoluccas, etcEssential oil. Used in perfumery. Otto or attar of roseRosa moschataTurkey and SyriaA fragrant oil obtained from the Eastern species of rose. Centifolia, Damascena Orange(See Bergamot, Neroli.) PatchouliPogostemon patchouliIndiaPlant affords an oil. Used as a perfume. Common Name.Botanical Name.Native Place, or where chiefly grown.Qualities, Uses, etc. Peppermint-oilMentha piperitaBritain, etcUsed in medicine. RosemaryRosmarius officinalisEurope, etcTops of plant afford an oil. Used in perfumery, medicine, etc. Sandal-wood or santal-woodSantalumIndiaYields an essential oil heavier than water. Used in perfumery. Winter-greenGaultheria procumbens.Nort
India (India) (search for this): chapter 15
in Europe for candle and soap making, etc. Souari-nutCaryocar nuciferum, etc.South AmericaContains a sweet oil. Much used in South America. SunflowerHelianthus annuusEurope, etcSeed yields an oil. Used in making fancy soaps, etc. Tallow (vegetable).Pentadesma butyraSierra LeoneTallow, a term often applied to solid fatty substances obtained from plants. That produced from the seeds of the Stillingia sebifera is used for candles by the Chinese. Stillingia sebiferaChina Bassia butyraceaeN. India WalnutJuglans regia, etcEurope and AmericaAn oil often sold as nut-oil. Used in the arts and to adulterate other oils. Wax (bees)Beeswax, although not strictly a vegetable production, is primarily derived from the pollen of flowers Wax (insect)Fraxinus sinensisChinaA kind of wax deposited by an insect, the coccus pe-la, on the leaves of this species of ash. Wax (Japan)Rhus succedaneaJapanA vegetable wax afforded by the fruit of the tree. Used in candle-making Wax (palm)Copernicia cer
Milan, Sullivan County, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
GuineaJacktan4 HamburgMeile8,238 HanoverMeile8,114 HungaryMeile9,139 IndiaWarsa24.89 ItalyMile2,025 JapanInk2.038 LeghornMiglio1,809 LeipsieMeile (post)7,432 LithuaniaMeile9,781 MaltaCanna2.29 MecklenburgMeile8,238 MexicoLegua4,638 MilanMigliio1,093.63 MochaMile2,146 NaplesMiglio2,025 NetherlandsMijle1,093.63 Place.Measure.U. S. Yards. NorwayMile12,182 PersiaParasang6,076 PolandMile (long)8,100 PortugalMitha2,250 PortugalVara3.609 PrussiaMile (post)8,238 RomeKilomeeated on his throne. his scepter in one hand and a lyre in the other, on which he appears to be playing, accompanied by several instruments, including the organ. E is from an engraving in the Theorea Musica of Franchinus Gaffurins, printed at Milan, 1492. F, from the Theatrum Instrumentorum of Praetorius, 1620, shows the ancient method of blowing. On each bellows is fixed a wooden shoe: the men who work them hold on to a horizontal bar, and, inserting their feet into a pair of the shoes
Sandy Hook, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
bjects and afford an extensive view. Used as a lookout-station for the firealarm service, for signaling, for meteorological observations, etc. The iron observatory on the roof of the Equitable Life Insurance Company, on Broadway, New York, is 22 feet high above the roof of the building, which is 130 feet above the sidewalk. The probabilities of the weather are indicated by balls 12 feet in diameter, displayed upon two signal-staffs and visible from various points on Long Island Sound, Sandy Hook, and the inland waters of the Hudson and Harlem rivers. In the building is a large map, displaying the territory throughout which the service has its stations, reaching from Mexico to Canada, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast. The state of the weather is indicated by dials at each of these stations on the map, from which reports are received every five hours. Ob-stet′ri-cal chair. One capable of affording convenient position for the delivery of the child and access of the
St. Paul's cathedral (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 15
se by going before the Lord Chancellor with Mr. Kipps. Here I heard very good musique, the first time that I ever remember to have heard the organs and singing men in surplices in my life. The class of native organ-builders having become almost extinct, inducements were offered to foreigners to settle in England. Prominent among these was Schmidt, generally known as Father Smith, who built the instrument referred to by Pepys. Among the instruments of this period was the organ of St. Paul's Cathedral, noted as being the source of much tribulation to Sir Christopher Wren, who considered that the harmony of his designs was spoiled by the box of whistles. This instrument was nearly 30 feet high, 18 wide, and 8 deep. About 1680, the barrel-organ used by itinerant musicians was introduced. The early builders were fond of employing outre materials in their organs, and of decorating them with precious metals and stones, or with grotesque carvings; animals, birds, and angelic figur
60931 miles = 1 kilometre. Kilometre1,093.6 GenoaMile (post)8,527 GermanyMile (15 to 1°)8,101 GreeceStadium1,083.33 GuineaJacktan4 HamburgMeile8,238 HanoverMeile8,114 HungaryMeile9,139 IndiaWarsa24.89 ItalyMile2,025 JapanInk2.038 Leghornor food and for burning in lamps. Are strung on sticks by the natives, and so used as candles. CarapaCarapa guineensisW. Africa, etcSeeds afford oil used by the natives for burning and anointing. In S France made into soap. CocoaCocos nuciferaHoOne of the purest of vegetable oils. Used in the arts and for salads. In Italy is used in lamps. PalmElais guineensisW. AfricaThe fruit affords the palm-oil used in candle and soap making. PinePinus sylvestrisEurope, etcLeaves afford an oil whicndia for cooking, burning, anointing, etc. Elsewhere used in lamps and for making soap. Shea butter or oilBassia parkiiW. AfricaSeeds afford an oil used in Europe for candle and soap making, etc. Souari-nutCaryocar nuciferum, etc.South AmericaCont
grown.Qualities, Uses, etc. AlmondAmygdalusS Europe, etcOne of the finest of fixed oils; used chieuit; resembles olive-oil. BeechFagus sylvaticaEuropeThe mast affords an oil used for burning and infor railway grease. ColzaBrassica campestrisEuropeSeeds of a variety of the cabbage tribe afford ers, and medicinally. Hemp-seedCannabis sativaEurope, etcUsed for burning, paints, varnishes, and f Java wax(See Wax.) LinseedLinum usitatissimumEurope, etcBoiled with litharge produces the boiled osia parkiiW. AfricaSeeds afford an oil used in Europe for candle and soap making, etc. Souari-nutCaia butyraceaeN. India WalnutJuglans regia, etcEurope and AmericaAn oil often sold as nut-oil. Used essential oils. AniseedPimpinella anisumEurope, etcSeeds afford an oil used in medicine and frfumery and medicine. JasmineJasminaceaeAsia, EuropeA perfume. Obtained from the flowers by placinile principle. LavenderLavendula vera et spicaEuropeOil used largely in perfumery and medicine. Le[18 more...]
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