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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight). Search the whole document.

Found 9 total hits in 5 results.

Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 23
X. Xe′bec. (Vessel.) A small three-masted vessel with lateen sails, used for coasting voyages in the Mediterranean and on the ocean-coasts of Spain and Portugal. Xy-log′lo-dine. An explosive compound invented by Carl Dittmar of Charlottenburg, Prussia. It is a fluid of milky, reddish, or white color, of a consistency varying from that of ordinary sirup to thick broth, and is intended to be mixed with cellulose or other porous substance to form dualin, though it may be used singly. It is composed of nitric and sulphuric acids, and either glycerine-starch, glycerine-cellulose, glycerine-mannite, glycerinebenzole, or analogous substance. In its preparation commercial sulphuric acid is boiled with pulverized charcoal until it is freed from nitrogen and attains the density of 67° B. 1 1/2 parts of this, or 1 part of the purified acid and 1/2 part of fuming sulphuric acid, are mixed with 1 part of thoroughly purified nitric acid, specific gravity 48° to 50° B., a
Charlottenburg (Berlin, Germany) (search for this): chapter 23
X. Xe′bec. (Vessel.) A small three-masted vessel with lateen sails, used for coasting voyages in the Mediterranean and on the ocean-coasts of Spain and Portugal. Xy-log′lo-dine. An explosive compound invented by Carl Dittmar of Charlottenburg, Prussia. It is a fluid of milky, reddish, or white color, of a consistency varying from that of ordinary sirup to thick broth, and is intended to be mixed with cellulose or other porous substance to form dualin, though it may be used singly. It is composed of nitric and sulphuric acids, and either glycerine-starch, glycerine-cellulose, glycerine-mannite, glycerinebenzole, or analogous substance. In its preparation commercial sulphuric acid is boiled with pulverized charcoal until it is freed from nitrogen and attains the density of 67° B. 1 1/2 parts of this, or 1 part of the purified acid and 1/2 part of fuming sulphuric acid, are mixed with 1 part of thoroughly purified nitric acid, specific gravity 48° to 50° B.,
phy. Sometimes called pokerpainting. When a hot iron is applied to the surface of the wood, it chars or scorches the wood wherever it touches; and if the operator possesses artistic taste, he can so manage these charred lines as to give them a pictorial arrangement. There were some specimens of this kind in the Great Exhibition, which displayed surprising skill, especially where the surface was charred all over, and then scraped to produce the picture, as in mezzotint. Copies from Landseer's pictures, and other subjects, have been thus produced with much boldness of effect. The production of designs by pressure depends upon a singular circumstance. If wood be pressed by suitable instruments, it does not recover its original evenness of surface until it has been steeped in water. The artist produces a sort of design on wood, by strong pressure in particular parts; he planes down the protuberant portions, and then soaks the whole in water; this brings up the pressed, or hard
Carl Dittmar (search for this): chapter 23
X. Xe′bec. (Vessel.) A small three-masted vessel with lateen sails, used for coasting voyages in the Mediterranean and on the ocean-coasts of Spain and Portugal. Xy-log′lo-dine. An explosive compound invented by Carl Dittmar of Charlottenburg, Prussia. It is a fluid of milky, reddish, or white color, of a consistency varying from that of ordinary sirup to thick broth, and is intended to be mixed with cellulose or other porous substance to form dualin, though it may be used singly. It is composed of nitric and sulphuric acids, and either glycerine-starch, glycerine-cellulose, glycerine-mannite, glycerinebenzole, or analogous substance. In its preparation commercial sulphuric acid is boiled with pulverized charcoal until it is freed from nitrogen and attains the density of 67° B. 1 1/2 parts of this, or 1 part of the purified acid and 1/2 part of fuming sulphuric acid, are mixed with 1 part of thoroughly purified nitric acid, specific gravity 48° to 50° B., a
January 18th, 1870 AD (search for this): chapter 23
f soda-lye and stirred until they impart a blue color to reddened test-paper. They are again washed in pure water, and then rendered anhydrous by being placed in flat chambers and dried with sulphuric acid and chloride of calcium, at a temperature not exceeding 50° C. A simple apparatus, consisting of a tank, with chambers or worms, and provided with suitable connecting-pipes, has been contrived by the inventor, for mixing and cooling the compound. Dittmar's patent, for dualin, January 18, 1870, embraces cellulose, nitro-cellulose, nitro-starch, nitro-mannite, and nitro-glycerine, mixed in various combinations, depending on the degree of strength which it is desired the powder should possess in adapting its use to various purposes. See dualin. Xy′lo-graph. 1. A wood-engraving (which see). 2. Specifically, a mode of printing or graining from the natural surface of the wood. A piece of wood is selected of fine quality, having the pattern of grain desired. The sur