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Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ssorter. Clothes-frame.Egg-basket. Egg-beater.Mop-head. Egg-boiler.Mop-wringer. Egg-carrier.Music-stand. Egg-detector.Musquito-bar. Egg-tongs.Musquito-canopy. Extinguisher. Fan.Night-chair. Feather-renovator.Nut-cracker. Fender. Fire-irons.Nutmeg-grater. Fire-screen.Oyster-opener. Fish-kettle.Palliasse. Fish-slice.Peach-parer. Flat-iron.Peach-stoner. Flat-iron heater.Pea-sheller. Flour-sifter.Percolator. Fluting-iron.Piano-stool. Fluting-machine.Pie-board. Foot-stool.Pillow. Fork.Pinking-iron. Freezer. Fruit-jar.Piping-iron. Frying-pan.Plate-rack. Furniture-pad.Plate-warmer. Furniture-spring.Pliant. Furniture-tip.Portable furnace. Gong. Grater.Portfolio-stand. Griddle.Potato-masher. Gridiron.Potato-washer. Hastener.Press. Hat-rack.Pressing-board. Head-rest.Preserve-jar. Hearth-brush.Quilting-frame. Honey-strainer.Raisin-seeder. Hospital-bed.Refrigerator. Ice-chest.Rimmer. Pie Ice-cream freezer.Roasting-jack. Ice-crusher.Rolling-pin. Ice-cu
Quito (Ecuador) (search for this): chapter 4
rried portable hour-glasses with them as measurers of time. The ancients had three time-measurers, — dials, hour-glasses, clepsydras. Alfred the Great added wax tapers; perhaps Ebu Junis the pulsating lever; Galileo and Huyghens the pendulum. See clock. The Spaniards found the Mexicans provided with sun-dials for determining the hour, and instruments for the solstices and equinoxes. Their day had sixteen hours, commencing at sunrise. The Peruvians had also their sun-dials. One in Quito, in the form of an obelisk in the center of a circle on which was marked an east and west line, indicated the equinox. These were destroyed by the ignorant Spaniards, who thought them idolatrous. Their ancestors had stared with the same stupid amazement at the Saracenic armils and observatories. Dials were placed in the gardens of the Tuileries and Luxembourg, so arranged as to fire a cannon at noon. A mortar is placed on the meridian line of the dial, with a burning lens placed over th
Florence, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
e of a prolonged or oblate spheroidal variation. In the data following, the hight given is that of the apex above the ground. The dome of the Pantheon at Rome is a hemisphere 142 feet in diameter, 143 feet high above the floor of the rotunda. The dome of St. Sophia at Constantinople is an oblate semi-spheroid 104 feet in diameter, 201 feet high. It is said to be built of earthenware and pumice-stone, not of cut stone. It was built in the sixth century. The dome in the Duomo of Florence was built by Brunelleschi in 1417. It is of brick, octagonal in plan, 139 feet in diameter, and 310 feet in hight. The dome of St. Peter's, at Rome, was built at the close of the sixteenth century, from designs left by Michael Angelo. It is 139 feet in diameter, 330 feet high. The dome of St. Paul's, at London, by Sir Christopher Wren, is not masonry, but a shell inclosing the brick cone which supports the lantern. It is 112 feet in diameter, 215 feet high. Internal Diameter.Int
Kent (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 4
aysails it passes along the stay through the cringles of the sail, and is attached to the upper corner. Down-share. A turf-paring plow, used in England, where the rolling treeless tracts are called downs. These tracts in Sussex are the homes of the Southdown sheep. (A. S. Dun, dune, a hill.) The sand-banks which lie upon the sea-shores of Holland are called dunes; hence Dunchurch in England, Dankirk in the Low Countries. Hence also the Downs, the famous anchorage off the coast of Kent, England, where the Goodwin Sands form a breakwater: — For whilst our pinnace anchors in the Downes. 2 Henry VI., IV. 1. Dows′ing-chock. See Dousing-chock. Down′ward-dis′charge Wa′ter-wheel. One form of the turbine or reaction water-wheel. The water is admitted at the periphery, from a spiral chute which surrounds the wheel, and, passing inward in a radial direction, curves and descends vertically. Downward-discharge water-wheel. Drab. 1. (Fabric.) A thick wool
Drag Spring (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
r of the king-post. Drag-saw. A cross-cut sawing-machine in which the effective stroke is on the pull motion, not the thrust. In the illustration it is shown as operated by horse-power. The log is clamped by levers. The saw is held aloft by a stirrup while the log is fed forward for another cut. Drag-sheet. (Nautical.) A sail stretched by spars and thrown over to windward to drag in the water and lessen the lee-way of a drifting vessel. See drag-anchor. Drag-saw. Drag-spring. (Railroad.) a. A spring attached to the drag-bar to lessen the jerk when starting up or increasing speed. b. A strong spring placed near the back of the tender. It is attached by the ends to the drag-bar which connects the engine and tender, and by the center to the drag-bar which connects the train to the tender, according to the English mode. Drag-staff. (Vehicle.) A pole pivoted to the hind axle and trailing behind a wagon or cart in ascending a hill or slope. Used t<
Paris, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
eter, and 310 feet in hight. The dome of St. Peter's, at Rome, was built at the close of the sixteenth century, from designs left by Michael Angelo. It is 139 feet in diameter, 330 feet high. The dome of St. Paul's, at London, by Sir Christopher Wren, is not masonry, but a shell inclosing the brick cone which supports the lantern. It is 112 feet in diameter, 215 feet high. Internal Diameter.Internal Hight. Mosque of Achmet, Constantinople92120 Duomo at Milan57254 Hall aux Bles, Paris, by Moulineau200150 St. Isaac's, Petersburg96150 Baths of Caracalla112116 The dome of the Capitol, Washington, is 287 feet 11 inches above the base-line of the east front. The greatest diameter of the dome at the springing is 135 feet 5 inches. The weight of iron in the dome and tholus is 8,009,200 pounds. The rotunda is 95.5 feet in diameter, and its hight from the floor to the top of the canopy is 180.25 feet. The central rotund of the Vienna Exposition building, 1873, springs f
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ssion, but it has its analogues in all idioms, and like its congeners, an hour by the sun, and the sun two hours high, marks the constant reference by those of out-door occupation to the master of day as the measurer of time. In the latitude of Ohio, a farmer judges of noon in harvesttime by reaching one foot forward to try whether he can step on to the shadow of his head. The tired farm-servant of Mesopotamia earnestly desired the [eastward] shadow, as he watched the sun gradually decline ind in the United States another form of this plow has been used in which the precedent portion is not merely a flange on the colter, but is a regular moldboard plow of small proportions, higher than and in front of the main plow. This is known in Ohio as the Michigan double-plow, and is an efficient implement requiring four horses. 2. The double-plow, having two plows to one stock, or two stocks framed together so as to have but one pair of handles and be operated by one man, is mentioned by
Solomons Temple (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
of a pair of leaves, each swinging on its own pintle and forming a double door. When doors were made to fold, they were swung inward; in this case one valve was hinged to another and swung back against its principal, the latter having pivots which turned in the threshold and lintel. Such doors were known in ancient Greece. The doors of the residence of the Inca Huayna Capac, in the vicinity of Cotopaxi, were similar to those of the Egyptian temples. The doors of the oracle of Solomon's Temple were of olive-tree, and were a fifth part of the wall. As the width of the house was 20 cubits, the doorway was about 6 1/2 feet wide. The door was double. The outer door of the temple was of fir, and hung upon olive-tree posts. The doorway was about eight feet wide, and the double doors had each two leaves. The two leaves of the one door were folding, and the two leaves of the other door were folding. It is not easy to find in any other very ancient author so clear a descript
France (France) (search for this): chapter 4
of from 4 to 6 inches, carefully rammed. In France the main dependence for tightness has been wor. It was invented by Hermann, and patented in France by him, June 3, 1854. He states that he makes1357 by the Lord Mayor of London, the Kings of France and Scotland being prisoners and the King of C810, and has been generally adopted throughout France and Holland, and partially in England. It is as is commonly the case in some houses of Northern France, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Dor′noc This form of engine is extensively used in France, and the monster pumping-engines, with 144-incy at Villetaneuse, three miles from St. Denis, France, is rid of 16,000 gallons of fetid waste water(Drahzieher). The draw-plate was imported into France by Archal, and into England by Schultz (1565).altambor, becoming tambor in Spain, tambour in France. The native drums or tam-tams of the Asiatin, 1851, was the invention of Colonel Morin of France. To the shaft A is secured a pulley C, and [1 more...]
Luxembourg (Luxembourg) (search for this): chapter 4
r the solstices and equinoxes. Their day had sixteen hours, commencing at sunrise. The Peruvians had also their sun-dials. One in Quito, in the form of an obelisk in the center of a circle on which was marked an east and west line, indicated the equinox. These were destroyed by the ignorant Spaniards, who thought them idolatrous. Their ancestors had stared with the same stupid amazement at the Saracenic armils and observatories. Dials were placed in the gardens of the Tuileries and Luxembourg, so arranged as to fire a cannon at noon. A mortar is placed on the meridian line of the dial, with a burning lens placed over the touchhole at such a distance and angle that as soon as the sun arrives on the meridian its rays, concentrated by the lens, set fire to the powder, the explosion of which announces the hour of noon. We take no note of time but from its loss; To give it then a tongue is wise in man. The voice is rather more energetic than anything which melancholy Young
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