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Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
any, that No person shall be excluded from the cars on account of color. The bill, thus amended, became a law on the 3d of March; and on the 16th of that month he proposed to amend the bill to incorporate the Metropolitan Railroad Company, by adding the words, There shall be no regulation excluding persons from any car on account of color. He also proposed a similar amendment to the bill respecting the Georgetown Railroad Company. These amendments were stoutly opposed by Mr. Saulsbury of Delaware, and others, but were, through the energy of Mr. Sumner, finally carried and enacted. Mr. Hendricks of Indiana said, in respect to Mr. Sumner's persistency in following up his amendments, that it was folly to attempt to oppose him when he had a point to gain. There is no doubt his very earnestness appeared to some as arrogance, and raised an opposition to some of his measures, which otherwise would have been at once accepted. Although he manifested such untiring zeal in respect to the gr
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
rave and patriotic service rendered in the present war for civilization. Moved by various questionable motives, England and France assumed at the opening of the war, and persistently maintained, an unfriendly attitude towards the Union. They early acknowledged the Southern Confederacy as a belligerent power, Through her leading statesmen England sharply criticised the war-measures of Mr. Lincoln's administration, and, in disregard of international comity, permitted the piratical steamer Alabama and other vessels to be constructed in her ports, and to sail therefrom, to commit depredations on our commerce. This sympathy with States in rebellion, and the infringement of maritime rights, alarmed the public mind, and received the most profound consideration of our diplomats abroad. At a large meeting at Cooper Institute, New York, Sept. 10, 1863, Mr, Sumner, in a calm, dispassionate, and exhaustive speech, exhibiting profound historical research, as well as an exalted statesmanship,
Centreville (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
mankind! Lo! our dear country's basis, there defined, Rests on truth's rock, though bearing falsehood's weight. Her founders take the old heroic state, While sweep the clouds of calumny behind. The nation's heart exults; and all man's race Hail their proud beacon, rising still toward heaven. Thus, from the sunshine of our Maker's grace, In these earth's latter days, while passion-driven, We love upon her sinless prime to brood, When her Creator's voice proclaimed that all was good! Centreville, Ind., 1863. Mr. Sumner was this autumn called to lament the death of his dearly-beloved brother George Sumner, who died in Boston, after a lingering illness, Oct. 6, 1863, in his forty-seventh year. He studied in Germany, travelled extensively in Europe, Asia, and Africa, and was an author and lecturer of marked ability. He resided long in Paris, and had cone more, said Baron Humboldt, to raise the literary reputation of America abroad than any other American. Among other works lie pub
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
hope and confidence. Immediately after the battle of Gettysburg, he issued a new edition of The barbarism of slavery, c dedicating it to the young men of the United States as a token of heartfelt gratitude to them for brave and patriotic service rendered in the present war for civilization. Moved by various questionable motivd Africa, and was an author and lecturer of marked ability. He resided long in Paris, and had cone more, said Baron Humboldt, to raise the literary reputation of America abroad than any other American. Among other works lie published The progress of reform in France, 1853; and delivered an oration before the authorities of the cihope of peace and freedom was on the evening of the 14th turned to the keenest agony, by the assassination of his noble and beloved friend the president of the United States. Mr. Sumner attended the illustrious patriot in his dying hour; and none shed tears more freely at the sad announcement, Abraham Lincoln is no more. This
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
the 3d of March; and on the 16th of that month he proposed to amend the bill to incorporate the Metropolitan Railroad Company, by adding the words, There shall be no regulation excluding persons from any car on account of color. He also proposed a similar amendment to the bill respecting the Georgetown Railroad Company. These amendments were stoutly opposed by Mr. Saulsbury of Delaware, and others, but were, through the energy of Mr. Sumner, finally carried and enacted. Mr. Hendricks of Indiana said, in respect to Mr. Sumner's persistency in following up his amendments, that it was folly to attempt to oppose him when he had a point to gain. There is no doubt his very earnestness appeared to some as arrogance, and raised an opposition to some of his measures, which otherwise would have been at once accepted. Although he manifested such untiring zeal in respect to the grand question of the country, he was by no means inattentive to other issues, and especially to those pertaining
beacon, rising still toward heaven. Thus, from the sunshine of our Maker's grace, In these earth's latter days, while passion-driven, We love upon her sinless prime to brood, When her Creator's voice proclaimed that all was good! Centreville, Ind., 1863. Mr. Sumner was this autumn called to lament the death of his dearly-beloved brother George Sumner, who died in Boston, after a lingering illness, Oct. 6, 1863, in his forty-seventh year. He studied in Germany, travelled extensively in Europe, Asia, and Africa, and was an author and lecturer of marked ability. He resided long in Paris, and had cone more, said Baron Humboldt, to raise the literary reputation of America abroad than any other American. Among other works lie published The progress of reform in France, 1853; and delivered an oration before the authorities of the city of Boston, July 4, 1859. He was never married. Whether at Washington or at his home in Boston, Mr. Sumner never passed a day inactively. His portf
Port Hudson (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
blic good. Mr. Sumner's earnest recommendation of E. M. Stanton to Mr. Lincoln as secretary of war, and his equally persistent opposition to Gen. G. B. McClellan as commander of the Army of the Potomac, appeared in the issue to have been alike founded on a just appreciation of the character of the men and the real situation of the country. During the memorable days of July, in the early part of which occurred the tremendous struggles and Union victories at Gettysburg, Vicksburg, and Port Hudson, he was at Washington, encouraging the president and his cabinet, and making provisions for the sufferings of the wounded. Always confident of ultimate success, he threw his own deep convictions into the hearts of those around him, and inspired the faltering with hope and confidence. Immediately after the battle of Gettysburg, he issued a new edition of The barbarism of slavery, c dedicating it to the young men of the United States as a token of heartfelt gratitude to them for brave an
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
s most tremendous evil, owes to his memory. The upright, honest heart of Mr. Lincoln could not but appreciate the straightforward and persistent course of Mr. Sumner; and hence, as above stated, the relations between them were most intimate and friendly. Though not himself a scholar, Mr. Lincoln held in great respect the learning of his friend, and heard attentively, though he did not always readily accept, his political suggestions. The president's reconstruction policy in respect to Louisiana, Mr. Sumner and his friends adroitly foiled, as not giving a sufficient guaranty to the freedmen. An estrangement naturally followed, which the public press proclaimed as very serious. But Mr. Lincoln knew the worth of Mr. Sumner; and, besides, vindictive feelings had no place in his great, loving heart. On the 6th of March, 1865, he sent the senator this card for the inauguration ball:-- Dear Mr. Sumner,--Unless you send me word to the contrary, I shall this evening call with my
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ess. On the fifteenth day of January, 1863, therefore, the Senate gave him thirty-three out of thirty-nine, and the house one hundred and ninety-four out of two hundred and thirty-five, votes for a third term of six years in the United-States Senate. On the ninth day of February Mr. Sumner introduced into the Senate a bill for the employment of colored troops in the army, which in another form eventually prevailed; and, on the bill before the Senate for providing aid for emancipation in Missouri, he spoke earnestly in favor of immediate, instead of gradual liberation, as alone consistent with a sound war-policy. On the 16th of the same month, he advocated, in opposition to his colleague, the exemption of clergymen from military conscription; and on the 27th he moved, as an amendment to the house bill to extend the charter of the Washington and Alexandria Railroad Company, that No person shall be excluded from the cars on account of color. The bill, thus amended, became a law on t
France (France) (search for this): chapter 16
civilization. Moved by various questionable motives, England and France assumed at the opening of the war, and persistently maintained, an alted statesmanship, considered Our Present Perils from England and France; the Nature and Conditions of Intervention by Mediation, and also bhile the tone of discussion was amicable, the aggravating course of France and England towards our government was most distinctly stated, and there its voice will reach, as the voice of Cromwell reached across France even to the persecuted mountaineers of the Alps. Such will be thismerican. Among other works lie published The progress of reform in France, 1853; and delivered an oration before the authorities of the city On the 4th of April he made a long and able report on claims on France for spoliations made on our commerce prior to July 31, 1801; and ond in the moralities of the middle ages, and in the later theatre of France. How genius triumphed over slavery is part of this testimony. Aes
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