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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865. Search the whole document.

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Andrew W. Leonard (search for this): chapter 12
nowles; Company D, Lieutenant Emerson, commanding, and Lieutenant Hallett; Company I, Lieut. Lewis Reed; Company K, Lieutenant Leonard, commanding, and Lieut. Charles Jewett,—a force of twenty-one officers and 540 men. Captains T. L. Appleton and R. ving that point guarded was demonstrated. Captain Pope's account is,— I immediately threw out one company (K) under Leonard on the Coosawhatchie road as skirmishers, and with the others threw up a barricade across the road. Soon Leonard reportLeonard reported a body of cavalry coming down the road, and at the same time a naval ensign with two boat howitzers manned by sailors reported to me, sent back by Hatch from the main force. I was very glad to see them, and at once sent word to Leonard to fall bLeonard to fall back as fast as the Rebel cavalry advanced. This he did; and when within easy range I ordered the ensign to fire. He gave them shrapnel with good aim, and they were apparently surprised, as they had seen nothing of artillery. After this repuls
Charles W. Lenox (search for this): chapter 12
llop, few were able to cross the road and they lost their leader. In consequence, the column halted, uncertain where to go. Homans took command and led to the right along the wood-road and formed on the right of the Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops. Adjutant Howard, the colors, and guard, owing to a mistaken order, did not follow Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper's companies, but joined the four companies when they came up. In the position taken, Homans ordered the men to lie down. Color Sergeant Lenox, writing of that time, says,— We were hurried up and went into the woods on the right side of the road, and took our position near where there were, I think, three pieces of artillery. The gunners had a hard time of it. I believe two of the cannon were disabled. I saw two of the horses struck by shells, and an officer pitching out cartridges with his sword, and in a few minutes the caisson blew up. The woods were so thick in front that the movements of most of the force could no
Alfred H. Knowles (search for this): chapter 12
ckon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, and Lieutenant Webster; Company H, Captain Tucker and Lieutenant Stevens; Company A, Lieutenant Knowles; Company D, Lieutenant Emerson, commanding, and Lieutenant Hallett; Company I, Lieut. Lewis Reed; Company K, Lieutenant Leonard, commanding, and Lieut. Charles Jewett,—a force of twenty-one officers and 540 men. Captains T. L. Appleton and R. H. L. Jewett were on staff duty with General Hatch. A large fleet was ready at Port Royal, the decks of the transports crowded with troops; and the pier at Hilton Head was full of stores and men awaiting transportation. During the 28th Captain
T. Butler King (search for this): chapter 12
m the regiment when Colonel Hartwell ordered a charge in double column. Twice forced to fall back by the enemy's fire, their brave colonel giving the command, Follow your colors! and himself leading on horseback, the Fifty-fifth turned the bend, rushed up the road, and in the face of a deadly fire advanced to the creek. But it was fruitless, for the pitiless shot and shell so decimated the ranks that the survivors retired after losing over one hundred men in five minutes, including Color Sergeant King, killed, and Sergeant-Major Trotter, Sergeant Shorter, and Sergeant Mitchell, wounded. Colonel Hartwell, wounded and pinned to the ground by his dead horse, was rescued and dragged to the wood by the gallant Lieut. Thomas F. Ellsworth of his regiment. Captains Crane and Boynton were both killed after displaying fearless gallantry. The One Hundred and Twenty-seventh New York supported this charge by an advance, but after the repulse retired also. On the right the Twenty-fifth Ohio
Charles C. Jones (search for this): chapter 12
enough, and said to me that it was his last day on earth; that he should be killed in the fight. Lieutenant Reid was a faithful, experienced, and brave officer, and met his death in the forefront of battle, his body lying in advance of the artillery pieces until brought back. The Confederates fought steadily and gallantly. But their position more than counterbalanced our preponderance of numbers. It is doubtful, however, if we had more than thirty-five hundred men engaged. Lieut.-Col. C. C. Jones, Jr., in his Siege of Savannah, gives their loss as four killed and forty wounded. But the Savannah Republican of Dec. 1, 1864, stated, Our loss was between eighty and one hundred killed and wounded. Our defeat lost us results which are thus summarized by Lieutenant-Colonel Jones: The victory at Honey Hill released the city of Savannah from an impending danger, which, had it not thus been averted, would have necessitated its immediate evacuation. As Sherman's army on November 29 w
C. C. Jones (search for this): chapter 12
The Confederates fought steadily and gallantly. But their position more than counterbalanced our preponderance of numbers. It is doubtful, however, if we had more than thirty-five hundred men engaged. Lieut.-Col. C. C. Jones, Jr., in his Siege of Savannah, gives their loss as four killed and forty wounded. But the Savannah Republican of Dec. 1, 1864, stated, Our loss was between eighty and one hundred killed and wounded. Our defeat lost us results which are thus summarized by Lieutenant-Colonel Jones: The victory at Honey Hill released the city of Savannah from an impending danger, which, had it not thus been averted, would have necessitated its immediate evacuation. As Sherman's army on November 29 was about Louisville, Ga., threatening Augusta, it would seem now that if our movements had been delayed a week, when Sherman was near Savannah, Hardee's whole army might have been captured, as the enemy then would not have dared to detach against Foster, and our force could have
R. H. L. Jewett (search for this): chapter 12
ns and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, and Lieutenant Webster; Company H, Captain Tucker and Lieutenant Stevens; Company A, Lieutenant Knowles; Company D, Lieutenant Emerson, commanding, and Lieutenant Hallett; Company I, Lieut. Lewis Reed; Company K, Lieutenant Leonard, commanding, and Lieut. Charles Jewett,—a force of twenty-one officers and 540 men. Captains T. L. Appleton and R. H. L. Jewett were on staff duty with General Hatch. A large fleet was ready at Port Royal, the decks of the transports crowded with troops; and the pier at Hilton Head was full of stores and men awaiting transportation. During the 28th Captain Pope's companies were transferred to the steamer Golden Gate, on which was Colonel Hartwell. After Companies C and E under Captain Homans were taken upon the steamer Fraser, General Hatch made the General Hooker his flagship. Orders were issued that th
Charles Jewett (search for this): chapter 12
Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, and Lieutenant Webster; Company H, Captain Tucker and Lieutenant Stevens; Company A, Lieutenant Knowles; Company D, Lieutenant Emerson, commanding, and Lieutenant Hallett; Company I, Lieut. Lewis Reed; Company K, Lieutenant Leonard, commanding, and Lieut. Charles Jewett,—a force of twenty-one officers and 540 men. Captains T. L. Appleton and R. H. L. Jewett were on staff duty with General Hatch. A large fleet was ready at Port Royal, the decks of the transports crowded with troops; and the pier at Hilton Head was full of stores and men awaiting transportation. During the 28th Captain Pope's companies were transferred to the steamer Golden Gate, on which was Colonel Hartwell. After Companies C and E under Captain Homans were taken upon the steam
George P. Hurlbut (search for this): chapter 12
Hundred and Twentyseventh, One Hundred and Forty-fourth and One Hundred and Fifty-seventh New York, Twenty-fifth Ohio, Thirtysecond, Thirty-fourth, and Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops; Col. A. S. Hartwell's Second Brigade, of the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Massachusetts, Twenty-sixth and One Hundred and Second United States Colored Troops. Lieut.-Col. William Ames commanded the artillery, consisting of Batteries B and F, Third New York, and Battery A, Third Rhode Island. Capt. George P. Hurlbut, Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, had a detachment of his regiment. Admiral Dahlgren formed a naval brigade of sailors and marines with some howitzers for duty ashore under Commander George H. Preble, and ordered the gunboats Pawnee, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard
Willard Howard (search for this): chapter 12
e, Mingoe, Pontiac, Sonoma, Winona, and Wissahickon to take part. Our regiment started on this expedition in light marching order, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper, commanding, Acting Major Pope, Surgeon Briggs, Assistant-Surgeon Radzinsky, Adjutant Howard, Quartermaster Ritchie; Company C, Captain Homans and Lieutenants Bridgham and Spear; Company E, Lieutenant Chipman, commanding, and Lieutenant Cousens; Company G, Lieut. David Reid, commanding, and Lieutenant Webster; Company H, Captain Tuce to cross the road and they lost their leader. In consequence, the column halted, uncertain where to go. Homans took command and led to the right along the wood-road and formed on the right of the Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops. Adjutant Howard, the colors, and guard, owing to a mistaken order, did not follow Lieutenant-Colonel Hooper's companies, but joined the four companies when they came up. In the position taken, Homans ordered the men to lie down. Color Sergeant Lenox, writi
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